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dev.to staff for The DEV Team

Posted on with Erin A Olinick

Predicting the Future: Which Programming Languages are Poised to Take the Lead?

As tech keeps moving forward at lightning speed, it's crucial to stay on top of the latest programming languages. The industry is growing and changing fast, so what languages do you think are gonna be big in the coming years? Which languages will continue to gain popularity in the coming years due to their performance, ease of use, and robust community support? And are there any new languages on the horizon that are poised to emerge and disrupt the industry?

Drop a comment with your thoughts and let's chat about the future of coding!


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Top comments (9)

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rainleander profile image
Rain Leander

While it's difficult to predict the exact programming languages that will gain the most popularity in the coming years, there are some trends and languages that seem well-positioned for growth due to their performance, ease of use, and robust community support. Some of the languages that are likely to continue gaining traction include:

  1. Rust: Rust has been growing in popularity due to its focus on safety, performance, and concurrency. Its unique approach to memory management and strong community support makes it a strong contender for future growth, particularly in systems programming and web development.

  2. Kotlin: Kotlin's concise and expressive syntax, seamless interoperability with Java, and strong support from Google make it a popular choice for Android app development. Its adoption is expected to grow in the coming years as more developers switch to Kotlin for its modern features and ease of use.

  3. Julia: Julia is a high-level, high-performance language for technical computing. It combines the ease of use of Python with the performance of compiled languages like C and Fortran. As more organizations adopt Julia for data science and machine learning, its popularity is likely to increase.

  4. TypeScript: TypeScript is a superset of JavaScript that adds optional static typing to the language. Its growing popularity is driven by the benefits of type safety and better tooling for large-scale JavaScript projects. As the web development landscape continues to evolve, TypeScript is expected to play a significant role.

  5. Swift: Swift is Apple's programming language for iOS, macOS, watchOS, and tvOS app development. As the language matures and gains more features, it's likely to continue growing in popularity among Apple developers.

  6. WebAssembly (Wasm): While not a programming language per se, WebAssembly is a low-level binary format that allows code to run at near-native speed in web browsers. It has the potential to revolutionize web development by enabling high-performance applications to be built using languages like C, C++, and Rust.

As for emerging languages, it's difficult to pinpoint specific ones that will disrupt the industry, as new languages are constantly being developed and experimented with. However, keep an eye on languages that cater to specific niches, provide innovative solutions to current problems, or demonstrate the potential to improve upon existing languages in terms of performance, safety, or developer productivity.

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codenerd profile image
Hiro

Hey Rain, is this your own opinion? It seems like your article is generated by AI engine.

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leob profile image
leob • Edited

Lol, a dead giveaway is when texts are TOO perfect, complete, well-considered and well-reasoned, with ALL of the aspects and details included (details of which a typical human would normally forget or overlook 80% or more) ... yeah I agree this post had something of a "robotic" quality to it.

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rainleander profile image
Rain Leander

HA! I will ensure to include errors next time.

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leob profile image
leob • Edited

Which means you admit it was AI-generated ... which by the way is okay with me, because "yeah why not" :-D

I must say that there are plenty of articles (especially many of the "listicles") here on dev.to which are so cliche and cookie-cutter in their style and contents - they all look AI-generated, even when they probably aren't ... what's more, I think many of those articles would actually improve if you'd let ChatGPT generate them ... :)

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leob profile image
leob • Edited

TS, TS and more TS ... already dominant, only poised to become more dominant. Yeah I know it's a boring answer, but it just seems the way it is.

(I could have said "JS" instead of TS, but the move from plain JS towards TS seems unstoppable)

I always had a little bit of hope that FP (functional programming) languages would reach a critical mass and have a breakthrough but it still hasn't happened, and probably never will (but the FP approach to coding will probably grow, within conventional languages like TS).

And on the sidelines (crumbs left when TS has taken the lion's share) - obviously Python, some PHP, some Ruby, probably Go, maybe Rust?

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yuhuishishishi profile image
I love integers

I think the low level languages will stay, while the "glue" languages will change. Low-level languages are used to build the infra of our software world. At the meantime, the interface of how we interact with those infra will change drastically. Natural language will be an important way to interact with systems and APIs.

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darkterminal profile image
Imam Ali Mustofa

The future coding is not about the language, it's about knowledge. Many people nowaday too confidence with AI but they forgot the root.

People born mature and grow like baby.

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philipjohnbasile profile image
Philip John Basile

I’d say TypeScript and Rust at the very least right now.