DEV Community

Cover image for Got Coding Superstitions?
dev.to staff for The DEV Team

Posted on

Got Coding Superstitions?

Welcome to Code Chatter, your go-to series for conversational coding insights. What makes this series of questions different from all the others? Well, truth be told, not much, but they're still thought-provoking and fun. Join us as we explore the coding world, one witty question at a time.

Share a quirky coding superstition or ritual you have for good luck or productivity.

Follow the DEVteam for more discussions and online camaraderie!

Top comments (19)

Collapse
 
balagmadhu profile image
Bala Madhusoodhanan

Put a line break or a comment at the 13th line of the code
giphy

Collapse
 
ranggakd profile image
Retiago Drago

Okay Taylor Swift

ts delicate

Collapse
 
jmfayard profile image
Jean-Michel (jmfayard.dev) • Edited

Best tagline ever in a job interview :
"Hey, I'm a backend developer, I work with Taylor (in) Swift"
github.com/izqui/Taylor

Thread Thread
 
ranggakd profile image
Retiago Drago • Edited

Can I apply for a job? Here's my actual GitHub page

ranggakd (Rangga K D) 繚 GitHub

blending code and curiosity to create something awesome for the community 氣拎蛤 - ranggakd

favicon github.com

Hi there - Rangga (GitHub's Version)

It's cool, that's why you click 'em
Code rules, collapsible heaven
But ooh, whoa oh
It's a cruel coder

With me
I'm a / an
Programmer
AI Tech Writer
Data Practitioner
Statistics & Math Addict
Open Source Contributor
Quantum Computing Enthusiast
I code in the dark of my room 兩

And I predict my data, forecasting from afar (oh)
"Unittest," but it's not just a few
Data analysis keeps me on cue

And I study now, the current state

Of Rust and Julia to seal my fate (oh)
And in Python, I find my worth
"SQL", ain't that the geekiest you ever heard?
I write those, grinding like a coder

It's new, commit of my projects :
Project Medium Story DEV Blog
Regression and Forecasting Metrics Exploration
Thread Thread
 
jmfayard profile image
Jean-Michel (jmfayard.dev) • Edited

I am not sure.
Even when you apply at GitHub, they don't care at all how green your GitHub internet points are.

Thread Thread
 
ranggakd profile image
Retiago Drago
Thread Thread
 
jmfayard profile image
Jean-Michel (jmfayard.dev) • Edited

I'm a recruiter and I don't believe in those statistics, github stars, leetscore code,
those are all internet points that don't measure anything meaningful,
they have a very weak correlation with the ability to do the work the company needs her to do.

For me the best way to evaluate a developer is to have a look at the work he does.
Just like the best way to evaluate a musician is to open your ears and listen.

Collapse
 
panditapan profile image
Pandita

clean + restart visual studio + rebuild solution

and if it doesn't work you restart your laptop/pc before rebuilding

Collapse
 
taikedz profile image
Tai Kedzierski • Edited

Don't use backslashes \ to split lines - especially in shell scripts

# actually remove old settings before redeploying, else it will append
ssh user@host \
    rm -r .config
Enter fullscreen mode Exit fullscreen mode

Somehow I got bitten by that once where the character after backslash became inline whitespace and caused a hard to find bug with the second part becoming a new statement on a new line.

Using parentheses usually gets us out of r trouble, and allows more granular commenting:

tokens=(
    ssh user@host
    # actually remove old settings before redeploying, else it will append
    rm -r .config
)
"${tokens[@]}"
Enter fullscreen mode Exit fullscreen mode

In python it's less likely to be an issue, but it's still nice for inline commenting

assert i_did_it(data), \
    "You did not" + \
    f"You did: {data}"
Enter fullscreen mode Exit fullscreen mode
assert i_did_it(data), (
    # Admonish programmer
    "You did not"
    # Highlight irregularity
    f"You did: {data}"
)
Enter fullscreen mode Exit fullscreen mode
Collapse
 
ingosteinke profile image
Ingo Steinke

Only slightly related to coding, but similar to some people striving for a green GitHub activity graph, I used to believe that it's important or helpful to have a high reputation on StackOverflow.

Collapse
 
andrewcollisterson profile image
andrewcollisterson

Certainly! It's always fun to hear about coding superstitions and rituals. Personally, I have a "lucky" rubber duck on my desk. Whenever I'm stuck on a coding problem, I explain it to the duck, and more often than not, I end up finding raposo frp apk the solution while talking it out. #CodingSuperstitions

Collapse
 
renancferro profile image
Renan Ferro

I don't know why, but programming at night is better than all day!

Collapse
 
balagmadhu profile image
Bala Madhusoodhanan • Edited

Agree

Collapse
 
manchicken profile image
Mike Stemle

Im not superstitious, but I am a little bit stitious.

Collapse
 
thatcomputerguy profile image
Griff Polk

ALWAYS DO THE MOST FUNCTIONAL PARTS AT THE END. DESIGN FIRST, MECHANICS LATER

Collapse
 
michalispapamichael profile image
Michalis Papamichael

I always kind of want finish the simple task first and then proceeding to the complex ones.

Collapse
 
jmfayard profile image
Jean-Michel (jmfayard.dev) • Edited

Backups : My superstition is that I still assume that they will work when I need them, despite history having proven otherwise