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The DEV Team

Code Splitting with Laurie Barth

ben profile image Ben Halpern ・2 min read

If you have a code splitting-headache, S4E3 of DevDiscuss might help

In this week's DevDiscuss, I was joined by special guest co-host Katie Davis, a front end developer who has previously worked at Shopify and League Inc. Katie and I tackled the topic of code splitting and the long list of things you need to know about writing JavaScript with Laurie Barth, staff software engineer at Gatsby and instructor at egghead.io.

Laurie authored an amazing intro to code splitting here on DEV in January. I highly recommend checking it out as a supplement to this episode:

Excerpt:

"According to MDN, 'Code splitting is the splitting of code into various bundles or components which can then be loaded on-demand or in parallel.'

In other words, when you have different chunks of code you can make choices about how you load them. When you only have one big one, your hands are tied."

I hope you learn a lot from this episode. I know I did 📚


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Acknowledgements

  • @levisharpe for producing & mixing the show
  • Our season four sponsors: DataStax, New Relic, Educative, and Ambassador Labs!

🗣️🗣️🗣️

Discussion (3)

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sylwiavargas profile image
Sylwia Vargas

I LOVE THIS! I'm such a huge fan of Dev, DevDiscuss and of Laurie that I can't wait to listen to this episode!

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laurieontech profile image
Laurie

That’s so kind!

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faraazahmad profile image
Syed Faraaz Ahmad • Edited

JavaScript is too huge for a beginner to jump into, and working with typescript is (imho) a better experience than direct javascript (especially catching errors at compile time). I wonder why more people dont use languages like Elm (I guess its syntax isnt the best) but maybe create even more languages that compile down to JS (or better, webassembly)

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