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Dev.to Review #8: Top 7 Of The Week, Discussed

dangolant profile image Daniel Golant with malik Originally published at soundcloud.com ・Updated on ・2 min read

We have a packed discussion about a set of really outstanding pieces this week, as Malik and I get together again to chat about this week's Top 7 Articles on dev.to.

To kick it off, we have "The Three Stages of a Developer", which discuesses the three broad stages and attitudes you may experience as you progress through a career in development.

After that, we move on to "Teaching Functional Programming: Two Big Approaches", where Ed Toro gives readers two broad frameworks through which to understand functional programming, along with a brisk history lesson and some practical examples.

In "Things Nobody Told Me About Being a Software Engineer", the author details a concrete list of practical lessons she learned over her career so far, both technical and social, which spurred a conversation between Malik and I that probably could've lasted a week. Really a must-read.

Moving on, we discuss an interesting new project launched on dev.to, launched in the post "Gitote is out now!", and talk about the value of community-driven projects.

With "The Unix way... or why you actually want to use Vim", we talk about one user's thoughts on the core strengths of Vim and the Unix Philosophy, and how that relates to our previous conversations on composability...

which leads us very naturally into a dense, excellent post on "Exploring Vim", in which the author walks through a brief history of Vim, his own journey with it, and tips on _ starting with it & sticking with it_.

Finally, we discuss "Awesome PHP Resources on DEV πŸš€ πŸŽ‰ 🎒", a piece that points you to all the various resources right here on dev.to that you'd need to go from 0-60 as a PHP developer.

our "Host's Choice" choice for the week is "Developer eXperience: error messages", a systematic comparison of the strengths and weaknesses of various languages from the developer quality of life perspective.

Did we say anything completely incorrect or make any mistakes? Bonus points if you find them all.

What was your personal journey into ~darkness~ Vim?

Do you have any reflections you'd like to share from your career?

Let us know in the comments!

We're still experimenting with post formats, audio, etc., so if you have any thoughts, feel free to let us know here, or on Twitter at @dangolant and @milkstarz.

Discussion (16)

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stealthmusic profile image
Jan Wedel • Edited

Thanks for having my post discussed in your podcast! It’s an interesting feeling, actually listening to two people talking about yourself... a bit like evesdropping on my parents door when I was young 🀫
It’s interesting how you think about the title, I didn’t thought that it could be received in such a negative way... next time I’ll think about the title a little longer.
And yes, you got my first name right πŸ˜‰

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dangolant profile image
Daniel Golant Author

Hey, thanks for the thought provoking post! I hope you don't take me too seriously on the title thing, it's just my own weird idiosyncrasy. If I've learned one thing from reading all these posts, it's that the community is better off if people put things out how they want to, and don't worry too much about reactions.

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Jan Wedel

Well said! πŸ‘
And kudos to the idea for the pocdast. I always wanted to record a podcast but couldn’t figure out about what topic it could be.
This should be on iTunes!

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dangolant profile image
Daniel Golant Author

@milkstarz had that idea too, we're going to look into it.

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dangolant profile image
Daniel Golant Author

Just an update: turns out getting onto iTunes is pretty simple. Our submission is in review, when it's up we'll let you know. Hope you give us another listen sometime :)

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stealthmusic profile image
Jan Wedel

Great news! Sure I will!

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vintharas profile image
Jaime πŸ”₯πŸ§™β€β™‚οΈπŸ”₯ • Edited

This was really cool! :D Thank you very much for taking the time to comment on my article and for the great feedback!

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malik Author

We should be saying thank you, you put a lot of work into that article and it shows! I'd definitely say my proficiency with vim has grown from reading it.

Like Dan I also decided to check out your vim config post too. Cheers :)

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vintharas profile image
Jaime πŸ”₯πŸ§™β€β™‚οΈπŸ”₯ • Edited

Thank you Malik 😊 I really enjoy writing and it helps me to learn as much as it does you and all of the readers :D That's awesome to hear!! 😊

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Daniel Golant Author

Really enjoyed your post, I have the one on basic config bookmarked for later :)

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vintharas profile image
Jaime πŸ”₯πŸ§™β€β™‚οΈπŸ”₯

Thank you! Hope you like it too! :D

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stereobooster

Thanks for reading. I didn't know this is not the first time you mention my posts.

Not to confuse you more, but Scheme is not necessary "the" functional approach. There is like the long-standing confusion that LISP is functional programming from the 60s and we just now starting to grasp functional paradigm (I also believed it). But before Sussman, who in 1975 wrote Scheme, LISP was pretty far from functional programming, for example, it had goto.

I would say that Scheme shows one of the sides of functional programming (it at least has first-class functions). And Haskell shows a different side of functional programming - it is more closely modeled after Lambda calculus, it has lazy evaluation, same binding, Monads to use IO and keep functions clear.

If you want to read more about the history of functional programming I recommend to read this.

If you want to dive into Scheme I would recommend reading SICP, also you can watch lectures by the author.

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Daniel Golant Author

Hey! Yea, I think you had a piece in either our first or second conversation.

Thanks for the history lesson; the historical approach is one of my preferred learning/teaching methods because it becomes much clearer why certain ideas and methods stuck (even though much of the time the answer is "just because"). I have my reading list pretty full just from doing this stuff and recording, but I have been meaning to put something a bit denser and... longer-term on my list, so thanks for the material.

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biros profile image
Boris Jamot ✊ /

Your podcast is really understandable for me who speaks very bad english. Your flow is low which helps a lot.
Thank you guys !

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malik Author

Happy to hear that you liked it Boris!

I personally am a fan of posts which collect great things together, as it's something I do personally so thank you for sharing this post with everyone on dev.to :)

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Daniel Golant Author

Glad you enjoyed it! I read your CLI tools post last week, enjoyed that one as well!

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