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Charming the Python: the basic basics

Vicki (she/her)
Vicki was once a manager of aircraft maintenance and is now charming Python. She coded #VetsWhoCode bot & Code Questions bot. When Vicki isn't petting her cat, she’s throwing a ball for her dogs.
Updated on ・2 min read

If coding tutorials with math examples are the bane of your existence, keep reading. This series uses relatable examples like dogs and cats.


Background

I have experience with Python, but saw this 30 day challenge and decided it could only help.

So, I went to the challenge content, added the Telegram group, and started to read day 1.

Link: Day 1 content
Note: This challenge was built to be beginner friendly and help people learn Python.

Day 1 Topics

  • installing python
  • a simple script in IDLE
  • addressing a syntax error
  • math operators
  • commenting
  • installing VS Code
  • starting with VS Code
  • Data Types
  • Exercises

link to day 1 material

Math Operators

Addition +

a =  3
b =  4
print(a + b)  # 3 + 4 = 7
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Subtraction -

a =  3
b =  4
print(a - b)  # 3 - 4 = -1
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Muliplication *

a =  3
b =  4
print(a * b)  # 3 * 4 = 12
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Division /

a =  3
b =  4
print(a / b)  # 3 / 4 = .75
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Exponent **

a =  3
b =  4
print(a ** b)  # 3 ** 4 = 81
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The ** is taking care of the exponent. If broken down it would look like 3 * 3 * 3 * 3

Modulo %

a =  10
b =  3
print(a % b)  # modulo 10 % 3 = 1
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Use this operator if you only want the remainder or whats left over after the division. In this example, we've done 10 / 3 which give us 3 groups of 3 and a remainder of 1.

This could be used dividing time. You can use the remainder for the next smaller unit of time.

Floor Division //

a =  10
b =  3
print(a // b)  # floor division 10 // 3 = 3
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This is important to use when you can only have whole things. For example you can't have .5 of a person or .2 of a plane. So, you would round down so you're only using whole people and whole planes.


Data Types

Type What Example
Integer whole numbers 1
Float decimals 1.1
Boolean True or False True
String characters in quotes "4 bunch of ch4r4ct3r5!"
List in order; may have different data types ['Dog', 9, False, 3.142]
Dictionary key:value pairs {"name":"Wiley", "breed":"unknown", age:2, "is_nuetered":True}
Tuple cannot be changed ('Vicki', 1992, 'E5')
Set may only have unique elements and may store different data types My name is Vicki, but a set would be {'v', 'i', 'c', 'k'}

Series based on

Discussion (1)

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asabeneh profile image
Asabeneh

I just saw your notes. You are amazing. Keep going! Day 3 has been release:github.com/Asabeneh/30-Days-Of-Python