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Posted on • Updated on • Originally published at dev.to

Instructive Python code examples for Beginners

Photo by Pakata Goh on Unsplash

Hi guys! I want to show you beautiful and instructive python code examples. Using them in training, you will discover new language features and your code will look more professional.
Let's get started!

1. We get vowels

This example returns the found vowels "a e i o u" in the string. This can be useful when searching for or detecting vowels.

def get_vowels(String):
    return [each for each in String if each in "aeiou"]
get_vowels("animal") # [a, i, a]
get_vowels("sky") # []
get_vowels("football") # [o, o, a]
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2. The first letter in uppercase

This works with a string of one or more characters and will be useful when analyzing text or writing data to a file. You can refine this code and make all letters uppercase to use case-independent search.

def capitalize(String):
    return String.title()
capitalize("shop") # [Shop]
capitalize("python programming") # [Python Programming]
capitalize("how are you!") # [How Are You!]
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3. Print the line N times

Loops are a hard part of the language. You don't have to use them to output strings.

Look how it's easy

n=5
string="Hello World "
print(string * n)  #Hello World Hello World Hello World Hello World Hello World
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4. Combine two dictionaries

Many of you guys, in order to combine 2 sequences, start overwriting one into the other. And again cycles, conditions, append and other horror... Catch a life hack, and please learn correctly!

def merge(dic1,dic2):
    return {**dic1,**dic2}
dic1={1:"Hello", 2:"Dev"}
dic2={2:"Python", 4:"Programming"}
# In these examples, Python merges dictionary keys
# in the order listed in the expression, overwriting 
# duplicates from left to right.
merge(dic1,dic2) # {1: 'Hello', 2: 'Dev', 3: 'Python', 4: 'Programming'}
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5. Calculate the execution time

This example is useful when you need to know how long it takes to execute a program or function.

import time
start_time= time.time()
def fun():
    a=2
    b=3
    c=a+b
fun()
end_time= time.time()
timetaken = end_time - start_time
print("Your program takes: ", timetaken) # 0.0345
# I love you Dev =) 
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6. Exchange of values between variables

Learn to use fewer variables guys. This option will look more elegant

a=3
b=4
a, b = b, a
print(a, b) # a= 4, b =3

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7. Checking duplicates

Here I draw attention once again to the fact that set contains immutable data. Just remember this

def check_duplicate(lst):
    return len(lst) != len(set(lst))
check_duplicate([1,2,3,4,5,4,6]) # True
check_duplicate([1,2,3]) # False
check_duplicate([1,2,3,4,9]) # False

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8. Filtering False values (or other)

An easy way to remove values from the list. Beautiful, elegant, and will show your code as the work of a professional.


def Filtering(lst):
    return list(filter(None,lst))
lst=[None,1,3,0,"",5,7]
Filtering(lst) #[1, 3, 5, 7]

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9. Size in bytes

This example returns the length of a string in bytes, which is convenient when you need to know the size of a string variable.


def ByteSize(string):
    return len(string.encode("utf8"))
ByteSize("Python") #6
ByteSize("Data") #4

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10. Load memory

It will be useful if you want to keep track of the memory that your variables occupy. The main thing is to remember:
Simple is better than complex.
Complex is better than complicated.


import sys
var1="Python"
var2=100
var3=True
print(sys.getsizeof(var1)) #55
print(sys.getsizeof(var2)) #28
print(sys.getsizeof(var3)) #28

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does not work with a recursive function

11. Anagrams

This code is useful for finding Anagrams. An anagram is a word obtained by rearranging the letters of another word.


from collections import Counter
def anagrams(str1, str2):
    return Counter(str1) == Counter(str2)
anagrams("abc1", "1bac") # True

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12. Sorting the list

This example sorts the list. Sorting is a frequently used task that can be implemented with many lines of code with a loop, but you can speed up your work using the built-in sorting method. Study Python deeper! And you will be happy.


my_list = ["leaf", "cherry", "fish"]
my_list1 = ["D","C","B","A"]
my_list2 = [1,2,3,4,5]

my_list.sort() # ['cherry', 'fish', 'leaf']
my_list1.sort() # ['A', 'B', 'C', 'D']
print(sorted(my_list2, reverse=True)) # [5, 4, 3, 2, 1]

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13. Converting a comma-separated list to a string

This code converts a comma-separated list into a single string. It is very convenient to list all the values of the list in one line. And besides, JOIN is a useful method in python

my_list1=["Python","JavaScript","C++"]
my_list2=["Java", "Flutter", "Swift"]
#example 1
"My favourite Programming Languages are" , ", ".join(my_list1))
#My favourite Programming Languages are Python, JavaScript, C++
print(", ".join(my_list2))  # Java, Flutter, Swift

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14. Shuffling the list

Everything is clear from the name here. But you didn't know that, did you? Really?

from random import shuffle
my_list1=[1,2,3,4,5,6]
my_list2=["A","B","C","D"]
shuffle(my_list1) # [4, 6, 1, 3, 2, 5]
shuffle(my_list2) # ['A', 'D', 'B', 'C']
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15 Splitting into fragments

This example will show how to split the list into fragments and divide it into smaller parts. Not so useful, but interesting


def chunk(my_list, size):
    return [my_list[i:i+size] for i in range(0,len(my_list), size)]
my_list = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
chunk(my_list, 2) # [[1, 2], [3, 4], [5, 6]]

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FAQ

I am a beginner, how should I learn Python?

Look into the following series:

Learning Python
Step by Step to Junior
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Discussion (3)

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ranggakd profile image
Retiago Drago

Since I love dict, number #4 could be one liner like this 🚀

def merge(dic1,dic2):
    return {**dic1,**dic2}
dic1={1:"Hello", 2:"Dev"}
dic2={2:"Python", 4:"Programming"}
# In these examples, Python merges dictionary keys
# in the order listed in the expression, overwriting 
# duplicates from left to right.
merge(dic1,dic2) # {1: 'Hello', 2: 'Python', 4: 'Programming'}
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vadimkolobanov profile image
Vadim Kolobanov Author

A very beautiful option) Thanks. I'll replace this if you don't mind)

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ranggakd profile image
Retiago Drago

I'll be honoured ✌