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Mahmoud Harmouch
Mahmoud Harmouch

Posted on

The Complete Guide To Using One Monitor As A Programmer.

The debate over whether one monitor is better than multiple monitors has been going on for years. There are many factors to consider when deciding which monitor setup is best for you, such as your work environment, the size and type of your display, and the number of applications you use on a daily basis.

No matter what your needs are, there is a monitor setup that will be perfect for you. Monitors come in different sizes, shapes, and resolutions. The most common one is the has around a 30-inch in diagonal size. It’s the standard for most people and provides a standard viewing experience. Multiple monitors allow you to spread out your work on two screens simultaneously, which many argue can provide a better working environment overall because it can help you to focus on what you’re doing. However, this is a matter of personal preference and often depends on the tasks you are performing.

In this article, we are going to discuss some of the key benefits of using one monitor on your daily job, along with keyboard shortcuts to efficiently utilize your monitor. If you are a Linux user, then this article is definitely for you, especially if you are using Ubuntu. If it is not the case, then try to find some alternatives.

👉 Table Of Content (TOC).

Benefits Of Using One Monitor

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It is a common misconception that one monitor is not enough for coding. In reality, it can be very efficient. Although, a lot of people have been using multiple monitors for years now. However, if you're a developer who really codes, there are some great benefits to using just one monitor for coding and development.

The first benefit is that you'll be able to save on desk space. With one monitor, you won't have to worry about clearing off your desk every time you need to code or work on something else. This will allow you to keep your desk clear of clutter and distractions so that it's easier for you to focus on your work.

The second benefit is that if the screen resolution is high enough, it will be easier for you to see the code in front of you without having to scroll back and forth between the two screens.

The third benefit is that your brain will be able to focus on the task at hand because the screen won't be divided into two parts. This means that your work will be easier to track and you'll have more clarity when you're working.I'm going to have one large monitor, but I might use a second monitor for something else (like a browser, for example).

The fourth benefit is that you'll be able to multitask better, because the screen will have a smaller "footprint." This means that the amount of space your monitor takes up will be less, and therefore you won't see two or three windows on one screen. This makes it easier to run multiple applications without constantly closing them. For example, you can have a spreadsheet open and a browser open, and you'll be able to move between them quickly.

The final benefit is that the screen will be easier to read because it'll have smaller borders. This means that your eyes won't need to travel as far across the screen when they're reading something on it, which will make it more comfortable for them.

Hidden Features of Using One Monitor

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One of the main advantages of using one monitor instead of multiple monitors is that it forces you to focus on one task at a time.

Studies show that multitasking can actually reduce productivity and efficiency[0]. It can also lead to more stress and even physical pain[1]. Using a single monitor reduces the risk of this happening. This is one of the main benefits. It also puts less strain on your eyes when trying to view two screens at once, reducing eyestrain, headaches.

The benefits of using one monitor are numerous. One monitor is cheaper, more convenient, and more useful for multitasking. In addition, it's easier to share what you're doing with others on a single screen than on multiple screens. It's also easier to compare two objects on the same screen.

One of the major disadvantages of multiple monitors is that they are generally more difficult to move and set up than a single monitor, even after being adjusted by an expert. Another disadvantage though is that each screen must be adjusted for the correct position and size by an expert, which is more difficult than adjusting a single monitor.

In the next section, I am going to share a handful list of shortcuts i use on a daily basis that help me to easily navigate between applications and such.

Linux Keyboard Shortcuts

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  • 🪟 + : Maximize the app window.

Maximize window

  • 🪟 + : Move the app window to the right half of the screen.

right half

  • 🪟 + : Minimize/Detach the app window.

Minimize

  • 🪟 + : Move the app window to the left half of the screen.

left half

  • ctrl + alt + : Move to the previous workspace.

  • ctrl + alt + : Move to the next workspace.

workspaces

  • alt + tab: Move between applications.

tabs

Wrapping Up

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This constitutes our guide on using a single monitor for your daily work. We have discussed the pros of using a single monitor, and the cons of multiple monitors. We also went over a list of keyboard shortcuts that help you easily manage your environment.

As always, this article is a gift to you, and you can share it with whomever you like or use it in any way that would be beneficial to your personal and professional development. By supporting this blog, you keep me motivated to publish high-quality content. Thank you in advance for your ultimate support!

Happy coding, folks; see you in the next one.

Reference

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[0] American Psychological Association, Multitasking undermines our efficiency, study suggests.

[1] Madore KP, Wagner AD. Multicosts of multitasking. Cerebrum. 2019;2019:cer-04-19.

[2] Ubuntu, Windows and workspaces.

Discussion (107)

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jeremyf profile image
Jeremy Friesen

I have long used one monitor for writing code. And usually with only focus on one application and one tab.

The benefits I've found are reduced tendency to context shift and developing patterns/commands/behaviors for navigating to different locations in the code.

With one monitor, Slack and emails are pushed aside. As well as my browser. I focus in my text editor and the problem at hand. But to maintain quick access, to related information, I have established conventions.

My local git branches are almost always of the form jeremyf/issue---<org>/<repo>#<number>. In my text editor, I can run a function to open my browser to that issue. I also wrote a function to create that branch based on the current active tab of my browser.

These "convenience functions" help me shift to different views without entirely shifting context. What I mean by that is instead of going to my browser, searching for the issue, and possibly being tempted to look at another tab, I've made sure that I'm facilitating connecting different sources of information.

Which is all about saying: I can only actively focus on one thing, and perhaps two side by side comparisons so one monitor is adequate.

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apayrus profile image
Rustam Apay

When I wrote yesterday an article about 2 monitors, I didn't guess that I stepped into the holy war topic :)

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jeremyf profile image
Jeremy Friesen

As a recent adopter of Emacs, I can completely empathize! (The long running "holy war" is Vim vs. Emacs)

But what you touched on is "Use the tools that work best for you!" And my observations is "The less I can offer myself the opportunity to self-distract, the better off I'll be."

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spock123 profile image
Lars Rye Jeppesen

Oh boy :) you did hehe

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nans profile image
Nans Dumortier • Edited on

I also wrote a function to create that branch based on the current active tab of my browser.

I'm curious about what the code looks like, would you mind sharing it ? 😁

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jeremyf profile image
Jeremy Friesen
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k4ml profile image
Kamal Mustafa

I have coding for 20 years now and only use single monitor. 3 years ago, I bought a second monitor and it really amazed me how great it is having a second monitor. I thought about all the years that I've missed before. But then I started to depend more and more on dual-monitor setup, to the point that when I go outside, I feel paralyzed without a second monitor.

So since early last year, I'm back with just single monitor. I'm using tiling support in KDE and love it so far. My screen most of the time just divided into two - browser (firefox) on the left and console on the right, where I do most of the coding and other ops work.

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inhuofficial profile image
InHuOfficial

Love the perspective of a single monitor user!

And I do agree with a lot of the points here despite my setup.

They key to any productive setup is something you and @jeremyf touched on, context switching!

The screen real estate is only useful if you need to see multiple things at once and they aren’t distractions. If you have slack open and in view, bad idea!

One tip to add that I used before I became a monitor addict was multiple desktops.

Have only 2 windows open at a time on each desktop and if you need to switch task use a different desktop. This “separation of concerns” keeps distractions to a minimum and makes switching between IDE and browser for example much quicker!

I think it also depends on your job type. Back end and doing code heavy jobs, single monitor FTW for focus.

Front end design or full stack, I can almost guarantee that multiple monitors work better as you have to reference so many different things at once and the constant switching from design docs to IDE to browser to terminal becomes a major bottleneck!

Great perspective on it and certainly a valuable contribution to show the other side of the story!

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joelbonetr profile image
JoelBonetR

I really need to see if I get a new email, sometimes are something important that I need to answer relatively quick. The same occurs most of the time with MS Teams so I need at least 2 screens when working.

Let's imagine that I work alone plus that I don't really need to have the email and a chat app visible all the time for any reason.

If I'm doing backend dev I'll eventually need to test things using postman, in the app itself, have some Git Gui or terminal, have a place to take some notes, maybe a kamban as well to organise myself.
If I'm doing frontend it's the same (maybe I can get rid of postman) plus I'll need to see the designs (Figma, Abstract, Adobe XD...) and some times I'll be in need to compare both side by side.

Alt+Tab let you switch between the current window in context and the one that was in context before so everytime you hit a different thing, alt tab will provide a different window cycle order.

Is it possible to work with a single screen? Definetely.
Is it better and/or more efficient than having two or more? Definetely not.

😆

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wesen profile image
Manuel Odendahl • Edited on

I highly recommend a tiling/tabbed window manager such as i3 on linux or yabai on mac, if you are a developer. With a few shortcuts, you can quickly move your windows around and keep programming layouts ready at hand. Every chrome and window that is not aligned is a waste of space. While I do have many monitors, I enjoy the same peace of mind as I do when I am just full-screen in my editor while on the road.

Get comfortable with the tabs in your terminal (for example, kitty), and learn how to configure tmux to be comfortable in it as well. You can then enjoy the same ease of window management everywhere, by the magic of the terminal!

tabbed window manager

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k4ml profile image
Kamal Mustafa

For those not ready yet to move away from Gnome or KDE, good news is both of them now has tiling support.

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afheisleycook profile image
Aheisleycook

There terminator

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babycamel profile image
babycamel

or tmux

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thegreytangent profile image
TheGreyTangent

Programmer 1 : Guys try using 3 monitors and you will be productive.
Programmer 2: No, I use only two monitors, 3 monitors are very distracting. two is enough.
Programmer 3: Hey for me, it hurts your productivity. Try to use only 1 monitor. It saves a lot of time, money, and energy.
Programmer 4: huh? are you guys still using monitors?

Note: The number of monitors depends upon your personal preference. Only try what works for you. Me? I'm only use one. Therefore, I follow some tips of this articles. Thank you for sharing. (-:

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wiseai profile image
Mahmoud Harmouch Author

Bear in mind real chad programmers start counting from zerOS...

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thegreytangent profile image
TheGreyTangent

yeah, I like that (-:

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babycamel profile image
babycamel

Anyone remember the days of coding with 0 monitors?

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thegreytangent profile image
TheGreyTangent

yeah, in the past long time ago. In the era of CNC I think. However, it a just only a joke analogy that i read in social media. 😁😀

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babycamel profile image
babycamel

I was thinking of the old days of teletype printers with reams of paper spitting out.

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hanpari profile image
Pavel Morava

You can add one more point why one monitor is better. The consumption of energy is lower.

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tqbit profile image
tq-bit

The shortcut to move one window to one half of the screen is totally underrated.

In case you wonder: There's a MacOS app to achieve the same as well called Reactangle. rectangleapp.com/

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wiseai profile image
Mahmoud Harmouch Author

The shortcut to move one window to one half of the screen is totally underrated.

Fact.

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ironcladdev profile image
IroncladDev

screenshot

I typically keep vscode on the bottom column and usually chrome and discord on the top. Other apps like mongodb compass and slack are usually in the back, behind vscode. Large monitors are great.

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afheisleycook profile image
Aheisleycook

I don’t use discord much but I use signal

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wiseai profile image
Mahmoud Harmouch Author

Matrix is even better.

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afheisleycook profile image
Aheisleycook

Matrix is good

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well1791 profile image
Well • Edited on

This is an interesting topic indeed. I remember back in the days when I was using two monitors, then I noticed a few things that I didn't like:

  1. I had to move my head left and right, or up and down in order to follow whatever I was doing (it was hurting my neck)
  2. When I was "tabbing" between windows, sometimes I was missing the focus because the app was in the other screen

Now I use only one monitor, and here's a few more tips:

Always use virtual desktops!

  • My first virtual desktop is for development (editor and browser)
  • My second virtual desktop is for communications and any other app related to work not related to development (slack and harvest)
  • My third virtual desktop is for background processes and entertainment (I tend to open a private browser with youtube running in the 3rd desktop)

Limit each visual desktop to max of 4 applications, ideally 2 applications is the best

Sometimes you need to use more than 2 apps (like insomnia, figma, or some database gui), and it's ok, but the workflow changes when it's 2 and more than 2 apps:
for 2 apps: Use alt/cmd+tab, it's easier to move between apps when there are only 2, it help you focus on two things at a time (and it will depend on the virtual desktop)
for more than 2 apps: If your OS allows to use some sort of alt/cmd+#app-number then take advantage of it, you will be typing less than walking through the apps

Use global shortcuts for your terminal on any desktop

Mac iterm2 allows to hide the window from the app-switcher, and set up a global shortcut to rise the terminal
Linux guake/yakuake are both great, and allow the same behavior as iterm2
Windows there's nothing that can help here, it means, the first virtual desktop will always use 3 apps ):

Other gotchas

  • When using the editor + the browser, try to focus the editor windows in the 2nd third of the screen so that your eyes are focused a little bit to the left of the center of the screen, also, it allows you to see some changes in the browser

screenshot of visual studio code over edge browser

The idea of this is to avoid having to move your eyes all the way to the left side of the screen to read code, and move it back to the center of the screen to see something in particular.

  • If you're using devtools and feel like you need more space, use more often the "responsive" mode.

And that's it!

EDIT

One more thing, always use shortcuts to switch between virtual desktops, personally I have found these shortcuts ctrl+f[123] very useful for both mac and linux (haven't found a good solution for windows).

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wiseai profile image
Mahmoud Harmouch Author

This is really a @well crafted comment. I appreciate you taking the time to write about these valid points. I wish I could pin your comment.

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well1791 profile image
Well

Indeed I tried to take care of this comment, the reason behind: I remember when I was using two monitors at work, then I decided to leave one of them, and the rest of the team was wondering "wut?!" so eventually I decided to prepare a few good arguments for it, and the final evidence is that I usually move fast between apps (which makes me look like a magician haha). Anyways I appreciate you took the time to read ^^.

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wiseai profile image
Mahmoud Harmouch Author

These are evident signs of a true brave warrior. Keep pushing forward, brah.

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moopet profile image
Ben Sinclair • Edited on

Wait... the most common monitor is 30"? Have things changed so much? Where does this stat come from?

The first benefit is that you'll be able to save on desk space. With one monitor, you won't have to worry about clearing off your desk every time you need to code or work on something else.

I'm not sure why that's different if you have more than one monitor. If the monitor is in the way of your desk space when you want to do papercraft or have your lunch, you're going to move it. It you have two, you're going to move one or both. What's the difference?

The second benefit is that if the screen resolution is high enough, it will be easier for you to see the code in front of you without having to scroll back and forth between the two screens.

What do you mean by "scroll" between screens? If your resolution is high enough, why does it matter if it's two 22" or one 34" wide thing?

The third benefit is that your brain will be able to focus on the task at hand because the screen won't be divided into two parts.

If you have a massive screen, you're more likely to split it into parts, aren't you?

The fourth benefit is that you'll be able to multitask better, because the screen will have a smaller "footprint."

You're talking about using a huge screen, which is by definition going to have a bigger "footprint".

I don't get this post at all!

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wiseai profile image
Mahmoud Harmouch Author

Just chill, dude. It was a G.I. Jane joke, silly me, quasi-serious response to a post published before this one. Not much work went into this post. And it was on Sunday. So. You get the point—more on the story in this comment.

But in any case, I still don't get why I should use more than one monitor. Even if you are a technical analyst or a day trader, more than one monitor is just too much. It is not beneficial for your mental and physical health both in the short and long run.—I like your constructive criticism about the ideas, BTW.

It is pretty funny to mention that, in most online debates, each group believes they are the "smart people" group. Humans are funny. Life can end at any moment, and I am so damn grateful to be alive. Have a nice day.

Once upon a time, a wise man said: "We should put more effort into forgiving than cancelling each other."

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noriller profile image
Bruno Noriller

My laptop is like 14' with a max resolution of 1600/900.
I'm middle of moving cities and it pains me everytime I try to be productive.

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fyliu profile image
fyliu

I didn’t even notice the 3rd and 4th benefits are opposite use cases. One is good for single focus and the other is good for multi tasking. Single monitor can work for everyone!

That said, I work better with 2 screens. One full screen terminal tmux split vertically between shell and vim. The other running a browser with developer console open. The key thing is when I save, the browser UI updates and so I can see it before and after my changes. Live update is less useful if I have to switch desktops to see the final rendering. It’s no longer “live”.

Well, I have about 12 windows in tmux all divided vertically in half and maybe the shell half has horizontal divides for running tests.

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d64134n0 profile image
Diego Galeano

Exactly what I was thinking.
I don't get it either.

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peterwitham profile image
Peter Witham

Great write up, thanks.

One advantage for me when it comes to using one monitor is not having to reposition all the windows when I disconnect my laptop from the screen.

I'm actually still undecided which way I prefer but I have noticed as I get older and my vision goes with it, that using big multiple monitors does not always work well with wearing glasses. I have to move my head too much to read the part I need to see.

I'm finding that laptop screens with a good keyboard shortcut routine and full screen windows is starting to work out better for me.

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afheisleycook profile image
Aheisleycook

This is good guide

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wiseai profile image
Mahmoud Harmouch Author

Thanks for the feedback!

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jeoxs profile image
José Aponte

I hear you! I believe the main advantage is gaining focus on the main task. BUT (😅yes, there is a "but"): I think this depends a lot on what kind of development you do. For example, IMHO, web development is more efficient with two screens, as you want to check changes on real time. Using the good old "ATL + TAB" is slower than moving your eyes to the second screen. And, remember, It is the same task.

If you're multitasking (ex: programming and reading discord/slack), then having two screens will not give you the best performance on your main task.

I really appreciate all the effort you put on this guide, as Windows shortcuts is a lifesaver when using a single screen. Typing a shortcut is a lot faster than moving your cursor. Thank you for this post!

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wiseai profile image
Mahmoud Harmouch Author

Glad it helped!

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unsungnovelty profile image
Nikhil

Checkout tiling window managers. The ultimate productivity hack. I moved to i3wm a few years and have never looked back. I am in the process playing around with qtile window manager which is configured with python. Have not found enough time is all. The workflows you can create with Tiling window managers. Just brilliant!

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Tawhid

Great article just wanted to point out that you shouldn't say "Linux" shortcuts.It varies on Desktop Environments and also extensions.Like you said Alt + up arrow and down arrow to move between workspaces but in Gnome with horizontal extensions it is actually Alt + -> and <-

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jmau111 profile image
Julien Maury

I'm also team "one monitor" 🏄🏼‍♂️. Besides, electricity consumption can be a concern...

However, I think it might depend on what you do. For example, I don't handle complex graphical renders on a daily basis. Many professionals need them.

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wiseai profile image
Mahmoud Harmouch Author

GG. One monitor gang.

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sinewalker profile image
Mike Lockhart

This is highly personal of course, and it also depends upon your work. A developer may indeed gain from only having one screen to look at, and focus on one task. A support engineer (hi) has a highly interrupt-driven workflow. "Flow" is a rare thing as well. I often need to context switch, and will have multiple different window arrangements across my main external monitor depending on if I am working and testing a ticket, researching a topic, updating documentation.
At all times I usually need to keep my chat session visible, and it helps to have this on it's own screen so that I'm not always juggling windows or swapping virtual desktops / workspaces to view it.
Also, a lot of web sites are optimized for a portrait screen, and I use my older (and lower resolution) monitor in portrait to read these rather than arrange for the window to occupy 1/3 of my 32" UHD.
Finally, I can direct Zoom to only share my laptop's built-in screen so that other people who are trying to read what I share don't have to view a 32 " UHD display scaled down to their 16/13" laptop screen

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wiseai profile image
Mahmoud Harmouch Author

I totally understand your position and here goes another real-life example:

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gvescu profile image
Gustavo Vera Scuderi

I always had this discussion with coworkers and some of my friends who are also developers. Multimonitor looks nice, but focus everything into one monitor is enough if your OS has the correct keybinds to switch windows (Linux and Windows are the best in that regard, they are almost designed to be used without a mouse).

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SPABOI

Personally for me, I would say that a triple monitor setup is the best for coding/programming while listening music or monitoring your stream, stats, opening up a reference page for something that you want etc.

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wiseai profile image
Mahmoud Harmouch Author

Triple monitor = Triple the fun!

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vall3y profile image
Guy Zissman

I use one monitor on mac. I highly recommend "Keyboard Maestro", I have defined macros to bring windows to the front of the screen.
For Example ctrl+cmd+T will bring the terminal, and ctrl+cmd+S will bring my code editor, ctrl+cmd+L is slack, etc. This way I dont need to move my head around or get lost with cmd+tab looking for my window

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wiseai profile image
Mahmoud Harmouch Author

I hereby declare my love and affection towards mac and cheese!

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Leonid Medovyy

The biggest advantage of learning to be productive on a single screen is you can travel and be productive.

My plan is to upgrade to at 16 next time I embark on an adventure. I may bring an portable extra monitor, but it really limits you as far as blending in with the locals.

There are definitely places where the last thing you want is to stand out.

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dinsmoredesign profile image
Derek D

I don't mind working on one monitor sometimes but I'm definitely more efficient with two (usually one external monitor and my laptop screen). After that, though, I've found adding more monitors just adds distraction and it's too much moving my head back and forth to see things.

That said, the main reason I find two monitors to be more productive is because I mostly work on the front end. I find it super annoying to have to switch back and forth between screens just to see a UI change, so if I keep one monitor open with the UI and another with the code, it's just far more convenient to see changes quicker.

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wiseai profile image
Mahmoud Harmouch Author

After that, though, I've found adding more monitors just adds distraction, and it's too much moving my head back and forth to see things.

That's what I am trying to convey in this article.

I find it super annoying to have to switch back and forth between screens just to see a UI change

That's what I have realized from most UI folks over here. They opt to work on multiple screens to see how the changes reflect on the front-end. However, I worked before on the frontend side of projects, and I used an editor called bracket, which has a built-in feature called live preview that allows you to observe the changes while coding. I think VS code has this feature if you install the live preview extension.

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Glenn A Miller

I use one monitor on each of my three computers. All are Dell 27". Two in landscape (PC and Mac Powerbook Pro M1), one in portrait (Mac Mini M1). I use OneDrive to network them. Most of what I do these days is either in Xcode or VS Code. It's optimal for me.

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wiseai profile image
Mahmoud Harmouch Author

Wait, what? So, doesn't that implies you are using three keyboards? Or a keyboard mux/demux is an actual thing? I have just googled that and found a piece of hardware called "KVM switch" for that exact purpose. Good to know that!

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Glenn A Miller

With Apple's new Universal Control, I can seamlessly use both Macs using a single mouse and keyboard. When I am programming on the PC, using a dedicated keyboard and mouse flips a switch in my brain to put me in PC mode.

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wiseai profile image
Mahmoud Harmouch Author

flips a switch in my brain to put me in PC mode.

That's deep...

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khokon profile image
Khokon M. • Edited on

Alt+Tab is a life saver. Been using this for years. Maybe just because of this one single feature, I didn't bother to buy a second monitor .
But defenetely gonna try multiple monitors.

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Firoz Ansari

Win+Tab is even more life saver.

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Scott Corgan

What's worked for me (may not for you) is that if you're on MacOS, set keyboard shortcuts for each app (ctrl+i for IDE, ctrl+b for browser, etc.) with BetterTouchTool. Makes it way faster to switch between apps and no need for multiple monitors.

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wiseai profile image
Mahmoud Harmouch Author

Good to Know!

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Ingo Steinke • Edited on

One of the few downsides of just one monitor is testing. Sooner or later, someone from a graphic design agency or a customer using a large jumbotron conference screen will have a web design edge case that behaves differently on a real large monitor than on device emulation or zooming.

Another downside is diffing large files or developping complex applications where we have to split the logic across a lot of different files according to a software architecture principle, like model, view, and controller. If I can't fit the different parts of the puzzle together in front of my eyes at the same time, I have to imagine that layout inside my mind, which adds mental effort and possible errors just because there is not enough space to see it altogether at once.

Apart from that, relying mostly on a laptop's built-in monitor adds a lot of flexibility to my work setup. I can just take my laptop to work mostly anywhere, in a train, a café, a campervan or a library. At least I could, if I was lucky enough to find a place where there is a seat, electricity, and a stable internet connection all at the same time. Probably too much to expect at least in Germany, but that's another story.

Finally I want to credit @dondenoncourt for the article One Too Many Monitors already published back in 2019 questioning "the deal with monster monitors".

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Jarrod Roberson • Edited on

I use 1 monitor, it is 5120X1440! Does that count? :-)

Actually have a laptop with a 1080P screen on with outlook and teams on it does that still count?

Oh the irony of it not letting me upload anything larger than 4096x4096 :-(

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wiseai profile image
Mahmoud Harmouch Author

That's humongOS!

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chema profile image
José María CL

Yeah, I like to work using a single monitor for my daily tasks. I basically have 3 concerns: coding, browsing, communication.

I have 1 virtual space (virtual desk on mac) splited in 2: browser and slack,
and another one for coding (the Webstorm and VSCode have integrated terminals so it's enough)

However, I like to open my Macbook as a second monitor when it's time to join to a daily meeting or a pair programming meeting.

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Herbivore Crocodilian

Used to be a 2 monitor guy back when I was tied to a desktop computer for performance. Laptops have caught up a lot in the last 20 years.
Now I work on a laptop 90% of the time.
It's kind of a hassle to do 2 monitors on a laptop. Though I've actually seen people dragging a little second USB monitor with them to the cafe.

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Wojtek Kalka

No benefits, three monitors are more efficient :)

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Mahmoud Harmouch Author

Yup! Benefits are for losers!

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Wojtek Kalka

Great minds discuss ideas. Average minds discuss events. Small minds discuss people.

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Mahmoud Harmouch Author

Totally! Being a loser is just someone else's idea. Wanna discuss that?