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Sufian mustafa
Sufian mustafa

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6 Basic Tips For Optimizing React Performance

Welcome, fellow React enthusiasts! ๐Ÿš€ If you've ever felt the need to turbocharge your React application's performance, you're in the right place. As developers with hands-on experience in React, we understand the importance of crafting lightning-fast and responsive user interfaces.

In this blog post, I'm excited to share some battle-tested tips and tricks to elevate your React app's performance. Whether you're a seasoned React developer or just starting your journey, these basic yet powerful optimizations can make a significant impact on how your app behaves.

optimize website performance

Performance is a crucial aspect of any web application, and React developers are often challenged with creating fast and responsive user interfaces. In this blog post, I'll explore some valuable tips and tricks to optimize the performance of your React applications.

1. Use React.memo for Memoization

React.memo is a higher-order component that memoizes the rendered output of a component, preventing unnecessary re-renders. Explore how to apply React.memo strategically to avoid rendering components when their props haven't changed.

import React, { memo } from 'react';

const MyComponent = memo(({ data }) => {
  // component logic
});

// Usage
<MyComponent data={someData} />;
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2. Lazy Loading with React.lazy and Suspense

Lazy loading is a powerful technique to improve initial load times by only loading components when they are actually needed. Learn how to use React.lazy and Suspense to lazily load components.

const LazyComponent = React.lazy(() => import('./LazyComponent'));

// Usage
<Suspense fallback={<div>Loading...</div>}>
  <LazyComponent />
</Suspense>
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3. Code Splitting for Performance Gains

Code splitting allows you to break your bundle into smaller chunks, reducing the initial load time. Explore tools like Webpack's dynamic imports to achieve code splitting in your React application.

const MyComponent = React.lazy(() => import('./MyComponent'));

// Usage
<Suspense fallback={<div>Loading...</div>}>
  <MyComponent />
</Suspense>

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4. Optimize Component Rendering with React.PureComponent

React.PureComponent is similar to React.Component but implements shouldComponentUpdate with a shallow prop and state comparison. Understand when to use React.PureComponent for more efficient rendering.

class MyPureComponent extends React.PureComponent {
  // component logic
}

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5. Memoize Expensive Computations with useMemo

The useMemo hook is a powerful tool for memoizing expensive computations in function components. Learn how to use useMemo to cache values and prevent unnecessary recalculations.

import React, { useMemo } from 'react';

const ExpensiveComponent = ({ data }) => {
  const expensiveValue = useMemo(() => calculateExpensiveValue(data), [data]);

  // component logic
};

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6. Optimizing List Rendering with the "key" Prop

Efficiently rendering lists in React involves using a unique "key" prop for each item. Explore why keys are important, how they impact performance, and best practices for choosing keys.

const MyListComponent = ({ items }) => (
  <ul>
    {items.map(item => (
      <li key={item.id}>{item.name}</li>
    ))}
  </ul>
);

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Conclusion

By implementing these tips and tricks, you can significantly enhance the speed and responsiveness of your React applications. Experiment with these techniques in your projects and observe the positive impact on user experience.

Show Me Some ๐Ÿ’–โค๏ธโ€๐Ÿ”ฅโค๏ธโ€๐Ÿฉนโฃ๏ธ๐Ÿ’•๐Ÿ’Œ๐Ÿ’Œ๐Ÿ’ž๐Ÿ’๐Ÿ’˜๐Ÿ’–๐Ÿ’—๐Ÿ’“

If you found this guide helpful on your performance optimization quest, why not show some love? Give it a hearty ๐Ÿ’–, and if you have questions or topics you'd like to explore further, drop a comment ๐Ÿ’ฌ below ๐Ÿ‘‡

Thanks for joining me on this performance-boosting adventure. Until next time, happy coding! ๐Ÿš€

Top comments (12)

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dsaga profile image
Dusan Petkovic

Is React.PureComponent still valuable to use, even with functional react that's mostly used today?

Btw. I would love to see a React project (SPA) that scores 100% on page speed insights

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sufian profile image
Sufian mustafa

Absolutely! React.PureComponent is still valuable, even in the era of functional components. While functional components with hooks have become more prevalent, React.PureComponent continues to serve a crucial role in optimizing class components...,

The primary advantage of React.PureComponent lies in its automatic shallow prop and state comparison in shouldComponentUpdate. This comparison helps prevent unnecessary re-renders when the props or state haven't changed, which can lead to performance improvements.

However, it's important to note that React.memo, the equivalent for functional components, achieves a similar optimization. When using functional components, you can leverage React.memo to achieve memoization and prevent unnecessary renders. The choice between React.PureComponent and React.memo often depends on your project's structure and your team's preferences....

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brense profile image
Rense Bakker

This is a great example of why AI is not going to take over our jobs. While the eventual conclusion is correct, it still tries to sell PureComponent as a good idea in the first sentence, because it refuses to give a single concrete answer to any question. It always has to look at the question from different viewpoints, even if it means that it has to create a fantasy to achieve a 2nd viewpoint :p

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dsaga profile image
Dusan Petkovic

When I use chatgpt for things I write, I only use it to detect grammar errors and stuff, If I tell it to do more, my text completely loses the essence, or the voice of me, becomes a bit bland....

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sufian profile image
Sufian mustafa

same to you ๐Ÿซก

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joelbonetr profile image
JoelBonetR ๐Ÿฅ‡

This comment and this post have both been written by Chat GPT ๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚

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sufian profile image
Sufian mustafa • Edited

Really ๐Ÿ˜ฎ I don't know that ๐Ÿคญ

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artxe2 profile image
Yeom suyun

In fact, when I checked the introduction of the article with zeroGPT, the probability that this article was written by AI was measured at 100%.
When I checked the introduction of one of my articles translated using Bard, it came out to be about 50%, and the probability tends to decrease as the number of characters increases.

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artxe2 profile image
Yeom suyun

In this case of the article, the probability also decreased to 50% as the number of characters increased. What is the truth?

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sufian profile image
Sufian mustafa

Thanks for information i don't know about it, next time i will check my blog on zeroGpt before posting

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joelbonetr profile image
JoelBonetR ๐Ÿฅ‡

No tool can predict accurately whether something has been generated with AI or not. On images maybe if the given AI adds hidden information but regarding text? No way.

There have been instances of anti-plagiarism and anti-AI tools that output false positives, punishing college students around the globe.

In this case it's super clear to me because of the wording, structure and so on. Could a person write that? sure, but it's way less probable because even though the grammar is correct the pragmatism of what is written is below average, AI has been trained with Internet content so it has tendency to write things near SEO shitposting level ๐Ÿ˜…

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adaptive-shield-matrix profile image
Adaptive Shield Matrix

Not recommended if you use typescript

react-typescript-cheatsheet.netlif...
Click to open "Why is React.FC not needed? What about React.FunctionComponent?

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