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endan
endan

Posted on • Updated on

What is your learning roadmap when you first started learning Node.js?

Just like this excellent roadmap for being a modern web developer, do you have your own roadmap or some kind of curriculum when you first started out with Node.js?

Right now, I'm having a hard time with Async and Promises and so I wanted to learn it from bottom to top.

EDIT (2018/01/22): I just conquered Promises! 🤩

I'm from a PHP background and just jumped onto the Node train, but well... things are so much different. 😅

Does anyone have a good resource regarding this? What is your own roadmap in learning Node?

Discussion (8)

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incessantmeraki profile image
incessantmeraki

I initially learnt the basics of JavaScript and then started playing with Node (making servers and those kind of stuff).

I recommend starting with github.com/maxogden/art-of-node and nodeschool.io/ workshops.

First of all you should understand the difference between synchronous and asynchronous operations. Then,learn how asynchronous tasks are performed in callback pattern. After that look how promise accomplishes same thing with different syntax .Fiinally, learn about the new async await pattern which makes same task even easier.

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jjjjcccjjf profile image
endan Author

Thank you!!

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attilavm profile image
Attila Molnar

Play around with runkit it runs node.js in your browser. It is like CodePen, but for node.

It nicely "simulates" I/O, like file system and networking operations.

Explore the examples and play around by cloning and modifying them as you like.

It has a nice output, for example if you got map coordinates from an API it will show the position on Open Street Map. Check this example.

You can also use glitch which support node.js and client side JS alike, bit it is still in beta. Don't let the design deceive you, it is developed by the same folks as Stack Overflow. My guess it will be most advanced online code-prototyping platform soon, however recently runkit is better.

In the beginning it is more useful to play around with little, but interesting mini projects, than writing a humongous one and notebooks constrain you to do that.

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nickytonline profile image
Nick Taylor (he/him) • Edited

I would recommend learning about closures, scope and the event loop first. Check out YDKJS. Also, here's a great video about the event loop.

I'd also highly recommend this great katas site, es6katas.org, once you get up to speed with all things ES6. I have some other front-end resources here if your interested, resources.iamdeveloper.com. Looks like I need to convert another gist to a blog post. 😉

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ssommerit profile image
Shawn Sommer

Thanks for posting the katas site for ES6. It's in my list of things to learn and that looks like a great resource.

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nektro profile image
Meghan (she/her)

I did not have a particular roadmap that I picked for learning JavaScript. My JS journey started back in the end of sophomore year of high school when one of my science teachers and his son started a robotics team at my school. And since I was the only one interested, I became the team programmer. As far as learning new things, I just make a ton of random things and end up Googling APIs or functions I don't know about. And over time, I eventually came to remember everything. It's been an incremental process over the few years I've been doing this, but such is life self-taught.

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jjjjcccjjf profile image
endan Author

Thank you so much for your contribution!

I'll try to watch his first 7 videos and see if I can invest fully on his package. 😊