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Tell us what your top unpopular tech opinion is 😈

Jess Lee (she/her)
・1 min read

DEV is in the process of launching a podcast and we'd love for you to be involved! We're recording the episodes in advance, and this week we'd like to know:

What is your top unpopular tech opinion?

If you'd like to participate, please:

  • Call our Google Voice at at +1 (929)500-1513 and leave a message 📞
  • Send a voice memo to pod@dev.to 🎙
  • OR, if you don't want your voice recorded...just leave a comment here and we'll read your response aloud for you 🗣

Thank you!

Discussion (256)

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brunooliveira profile image
Bruno Oliveira

Top unpopular opinion:
I can still be more productive and integrate web apps much faster when using vanilla JS and jQuery than literally ANY JS framework.

Top unpopular opinion 2:
People who only learn full-stack Javascript will have a biased vision on web development

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bholmesdev profile image
Ben Holmes

Agreed, but it really depends on the project for me. If I start rendering a bunch of JSON lists I am not on board, but sometimes vanilla just makes things run faster. I was actually converting a vanilla ES6 app to Angular for a research team and noticed a bunch of choppy scrolling. Converted some Angular state management back to some simple DOM queries, and everything was back to normal. Something to be said for that!

Oh, but I won't touch JQuery with a ten foot pole. ES6 minus IE support all the way 😁

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leastbad profile image
leastbad

You are 100% not crazy.

I do encourage you to check out Stimulus because it makes it so easy to ensure that your code is mutation-safe, but agree that vanilla really is the best flavor.

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david_ojeda profile image
David Ojeda

Stimulus is awesome!

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jeremycmorgan profile image
Jeremy Morgan

I agree, depending on the project. It's pure engineering. You have to weigh the advantages of a framework vs the overhead. Folks love to trash jQuery but the simple fact is you can have a project that meets all of your objectives for performance, security, and features with vanilla and jQuery and not spend a ton of time developing it. The end result is a quickly developed quality product. I respect people willing to make a choice like that.

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codingmindfully profile image
Daragh Byrne • Edited

Number 2 especially. The nuts and bolts of http are not going anywhere and you need to get your hands dirtier with that stuff than backend javascript points you towards. Also, back end architecture is a thing for a reason and it's exposed in different ways by more traditional frameworks.

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tommykolkman profile image
Tommy Kolkman

I feel you about the JS / jQuery debate, haha. I ship way faster too, that way. I do feel, however, that I am not improving myself, just repeating tricks. React / Vue force me to organise my code a bit better. Takes longer though, but might be better for scalability and all that.

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moopet profile image
Ben Sinclair

I'm not sure either of those are unpopular:

It's definitely quicker and easier to do things without a framework up to a certain point, at least.

Anyone who only learns X is going to be at a disadvantage when they play with the other alphabet blocks.

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brunooliveira profile image
Bruno Oliveira

I meant unpopular in the sense that everybody seems to favor using a framework now instead of also understanding that the basic principles still hold. And well honestly I'm trying to learn Svelte now and well I could embedded a Google maps map on a page in 5 minutes using JS for example but in Svelte there's some restrictions on how components are mounted, how files are defined, etc... I wonder if in the end for a similar result, the code won't end up being harder to work with

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lehmannsystems profile image
Mike

cheers to the first one!

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leoat12 profile image
Leonardo Teteo • Edited

Python is overrated. It is a weird language, you spend more time organizing tabs than anything else. Not to mention the dependency management, having to do venv and all that. I don't use Python very often (I avoid), but when I have to, I sometimes forget the venv thing and once when using boto3 it messed with my aws-cli installation and I was "what?!". Now aws-cli wisely uses a embedded and completely independent copy of Python, now we know why.

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codypearce profile image
Cody Pearce • Edited

I like python as a language but I’ve wasted so much time with its bad dependency management and environments. I’ve tried a bunch of tools that promise to make it better but they always fall short of something like npm.

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ianturton profile image
Ian Turton

but npm is even worse, when I'm forced to install npm I look back on python virtual env's fondly.

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hadrianhughes profile image
Hadrian Hughes

What don't you like about NPM?

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ianturton profile image
Ian Turton

That it routinely screws my whole machine up due to mismatched versions.

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hadrianhughes profile image
Hadrian Hughes

Yeah that's a fair point. I use nvm to quickly switch between versions, that makes it much more tolerable 🙂

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rhymes profile image
rhymes

venv is weird haha, check out Poetry for dependency management the next time you're working with Python!

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leoat12 profile image
Leonardo Teteo

I will definitely try it out, even the Python lovers where I work will adopt if it goes well. I don't think people are in love with venv. hahaha

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patarapolw profile image
Pacharapol Withayasakpunt • Edited

How about Pipenv and Pipfile are overrated and over-promoted. (Actually, the creator of Pipenv and *for Humans, received a lot of criticisms on Reddit.)

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patarapolw profile image
Pacharapol Withayasakpunt • Edited

Although I do agree that Python is overrated, I never really care about, nor do understand, the indentation hate.

It is overrated because data types and data structures are slow, unless you use some C/C++ bindings, like NumPy. So in the end, it just wraps another language.

Not to mention that the IDE is never as smart as TypeScript, Kotlin or Java.

venv is overrated or not, it might be better than polluting the global installation by default, like Golang or Ruby.

JupyterLab and Conda are cool, but I don't get why it is built into Python.

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codemouse92 profile image
Jason C. McDonald • Edited

Small pedantic note: the data types and data structures are slow in CPython, the default implementation. Pypy, another major implementation of Python, is implemented in itself instead of atop C, and performs much closer to compiled languages.

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waylonwalker profile image
Waylon Walker

aws-cli and boto3 are the worst offenders for botching up an environment.

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lukaszahradnik profile image
Lukáš Zahradník

Ok, so it's overrated because it forces you to make your code readable and you don't know how to manage dependencies and envs properly.

People would tab their code in the same way anyway, so there is really no time wasted..

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leoat12 profile image
Leonardo Teteo

I prefer curly braces, it is easier to know exactly where something starts and ends.

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patarapolw profile image
Pacharapol Withayasakpunt • Edited

You can from __future__ import braces. Haven't you tried. 🤣

Indentation-based syntax is just another flavor, but limitation to single line lambda is unacceptable.

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lukaszahradnik profile image
Lukáš Zahradník • Edited

You can actually use braces with custom encoding. Also lambdas should be trivial. You can always give it a name and declare it as a normal function.

You can see exactly where something starts/ends by looking at indentation, which is easier than looking for braces.

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kieran815 profile image
Comment marked as low quality/non-constructive by the community. View Code of Conduct
Kieran815

Calm down. It's his opinion, not verified fact. Smoke a bowl or something.

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coffeecraftcode profile image
Christina Gorton

Working with CSS, especially Flexbox or CSS Grid is 100 times easier than figuring out Bootstrap/ overriding all the Bootstrap stuff you don't want.

Also Firefox > Chrome.

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mmohammadi9812 profile image
Mohammad Mohammadi

+1 for Firefox > Google chrome.

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ehsan profile image
Ehsan Azizi

I do use Chrome but only for it's developer tools which is awesome and to be honest better than Firefox's.

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stephanie profile image
Stephanie Handsteiner

Chrome is great for JS debugging, but Firefox' DevTools really stand out when you're working with the layout. Especially if you're using Grids!

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rhymes profile image
rhymes

The main thing I'm missing in Firefox Dev Tools is service workers debugging

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coffeecraftcode profile image
Christina Gorton

Yes, this is why I love Firefox dev tools too! I do a lot with the visual side of Front-end and the grid inspector, accessibility, and animation tools in Firefox are great.

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axelledrouge profile image
AxelleDRouge

Yes I agree completely too, I like working with Firefox dev tools for the visual aspect

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n8chz profile image
Lorraine Lee

I've never tried coding with Bootstrap, but just speaking as a passive consumer of web content, I claim I can spot a Bootstrap website from a thousand kilometers away. Whenever I suspect it, I do some view source, and voy-la, right every time. It's a certain look and feel that is very cliché. Some websites simply scream "Bootstrap!"

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haruanm profile image
Haruan Justino

+1 for both.

But about bootstrap, the design system sees important if you don't have a design to follow/need to create your own design.

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matthewbdaly profile image
Matthew Daly

I like Tailwind for styling these days - I find it's better for prototyping than Bootstrap and is less prone to making sites look "same-y".

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michaelandreuzza profile image
michael-andreuzza • Edited
  • CSS rocks
  • Bootstrap is overrated.
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scrabill profile image
Shannon Crabill

I agree with the above statement.

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michaelandreuzza profile image
michael-andreuzza

💪💪

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marcusatlocalhost profile image
Marcus
  • knowing CSS rocks
  • bootstrap is fine

:)

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michaelandreuzza profile image
michael-andreuzza

👍

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stephanie profile image
Stephanie Handsteiner

Yes, to both, especially since CSS-Grid and Flexbox exist. 👌

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nyamador profile image
Desmond

I agree with your statement.

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hadrianhughes profile image
Hadrian Hughes

100% agree

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michaelandreuzza profile image
michael-andreuzza

💪💪💪💪💪💪

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bhavaniravi profile image
Bhavani Ravi

Docker & Kubernetes are not solution to your scalability problems

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lauriy profile image
Lauri Elias

I agree, but they're kind of helpful in other ways. Every idiot knows how to docker-compose up for one, and on a good k8s setup you can pretty much create end-to-end applications all by your lonesome even in an enterprise setting: create a new deployment, service, etc., get resources automatically allocated (to some limit), domains automatically configured in F5 (in our case). So instead of writing emails and Jiras for weeks to get dev/test/live virtual machines, firewall holes, permissions, whatnot, I can just get to building stuff.

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cryptoquick profile image
Distributed Hunter Trujillo

This. It's basically kicking the can down the road by throwing more money at the problem.

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mrsaeeddev profile image
Saeed Ahmad

So, it's about the use of strictly typed languages like TypeScript. I think that it's Okay to use JavaScript most of the time however there might be cases when you need strict typing but normally it's not required. Personally, I hate TypeScript.

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cryptoquick profile image
Distributed Hunter Trujillo

I mean, if you're not ready to dive deep into Rust, TypeScript is an acceptable compromise for now. JavaScript is a pretty awful experience once you've been developing in Rust long enough, though. Frameworks like Percy, Iced, and Yew are amazing.

Iced lets you write GUI without needing HTML, CSS, and JS. It uses low-level GPU draw calls to WebGPU, Vulkan, and Metal graphics APIs. You can have desktop, web, and mobile builds all from the same codebase. The binaries are highly optimized and 10-100x smaller than Electron.

Percy should be familiar to React and Next.js users. The HTML macros are great, and it can run your application on the server, giving you the best of both worlds. Serverside rendering is one thing, but you can also hydrate and introduce state from your database using context from the request itself, just like the good old days.

WebAssembly is happening right now, and JS and compiled-to-JS languages will never be able to compete due to their reliance on JIT and GC alone.

There becomes a point where it's not realistic to expect your users to have a machine of limitless power to compensate for the deficiencies of your own technical decisions.

The industry is already adopting TypeScript for most new projects. It won't be long until we abandon JS completely.

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qm3ster profile image
Mihail Malo
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cryptoquick profile image
Distributed Hunter Trujillo

Looks neat, but I have concerns. One is, it's not usually necessary to need to install additional Node dependencies for WASM projects. Percy and Iced don't need this. I also don't see an isomorphic (frontend and backend rendering) example. Percy has this. Also, does it support Browser History API routing? I just saw the hashes in the routing file for the todomvc example.

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qm3ster profile image
Mihail Malo

Which dependencies are you talking about?
Just like github.com/ryansolid/solid, there is no support for SSR "yet".
My unpopular opinion for this article is that SSR is overrated.
You can use any router you want, the example uses hashes so that you can try it out with any static file server.
One thing that project desperately needs is better public relations/documentation, such as examples that serve out of the box with one command.
In hopes of which I am raising awareness :v

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cryptoquick profile image
Distributed Hunter Trujillo

I recommend checking out Percy and Iced, also. SSR is important because it allows you to be more flexible with your infrastructure. It also helps you support more dynamic values in OG tags, and I'm not sure if Google and others support SSR with WASM apps. Additionally, starting with SSR in mind is just nice because SPAs shouldn't be the prescriptive solution to every problem.

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qm3ster profile image
Mihail Malo

OG is an interesting usecase. I currently spend more of my time thinking about deep web.
Injecting OG tags + standard payload as an alternative to SSR would be fun.
My mind immediately jumps to also injecting an "initial data" bundle at the end of the payload though, and I have to remind myself that that's overengineering.
SSR is a nice-to-have when it's completely free. But it's never free, is it? Even if you are forced to run servers for some other reason, it's all the development effort to keep your data sources isomorphic.
I am not (yet) in the camp of "oh my god, why are you sending that poor person with the metered connection all that markup that they could render themselves", just the "SSR is hard, and there are other, more 'organic' optimizations that you could spend your time on".

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patarapolw profile image
Pacharapol Withayasakpunt • Edited

When will the time come?

I personally don't really care about JavaScript, although I do care about WORA for both desktop, tablet and mobile; and no-installation needed.

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cryptoquick profile image
Distributed Hunter Trujillo

The future is now:
github.com/hecrj/iced

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patarapolw profile image
Pacharapol Withayasakpunt

It seems to use WASM for mobile.

I am also looking for web browser alternatives, like Expo, actually. But Expo seems not to target desktop apps.

Cordova can integrates with Electron and also mobile, but it seems to reset every time mobile app is updated.

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cryptoquick profile image
Distributed Hunter Trujillo

The project is early on, but there's actually been efforts to make it Native. Also, Expo (Fancy React Native) is a terrible compromise, similar to those made by Electron, but exacerbated by the limitations of mobile hardware.

Check it out:

github.com/iced-rs/ios-examples

Notice the build target:

github.com/iced-rs/ios-examples/bl...

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leastbad profile image
leastbad

This is clearly the darkest timeline.

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ryansmith profile image
Ryan Smith

I think it depends on the codebase and the discipline of the coders. If it is something large with many developers or old and bug-ridden, slowly converting parts to TypeScript may help to identify areas where types are a mismatch and are causing unexpected behavior. If it is a newer/small codebase with a small team and everyone is using a linting tool, then it may be overkill to use TypeScript.

JavaScript codebases can also get some of the benefits without having to rewrite code to use the TypeScript compiler to report on issues. It can be run from the command line or VSCode will report some of those issues automatically.

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mrsaeeddev profile image
Saeed Ahmad

Yes, exactly that's what I think. Most of the time we have small projects in which we don't need TypeScript per se. I have seen some people emphasizing too much on TS for everything. That behaviour bothers me.

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mkenzo_8 profile image
mkenzo8

I thought I was the only one

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mrsaeeddev profile image
Saeed Ahmad

Oh we are in the same party!

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leastbad profile image
leastbad

Sing it loud, brother.

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mrsaeeddev profile image
Saeed Ahmad

I am saying it louder!

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leastbad profile image
leastbad • Edited

If you start your projects by asking which SPA instead of why SPA you're doing it wrong.

There's an entire generation of developers who are hive-minded about the idea that monolith = bad, React/Vue = good. They are being lied to because it's profitable for their employers. It's a hegemony and a cult. From the outside, it looks like the inmates are running the asylum.

Seriously: use your favorite stable and proven server-rendered framework, devise a caching strategy where Redis is hot with a >99% hit rate, use Turbolinks to make things load faster than the eye can see, and use Stimulus to manage what little client logic you truly need.

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brunodrugowick profile image
Bruno Drugowick

I came down here searching for your comment. That's exactly my opinion.

I'd add that not only this generation of developers, but the not-so-tech and not-so-young managers generation (specially some business tech-ish decision-makers I had to deal with) is sometimes so toxic that I found myself having to throw a buzzword out of the blue, without making any sense, to be taken seriously or have my requests approved. It sounds absurd, but it's true and it works... and that's sad!

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leastbad profile image
leastbad

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cryptoquick profile image
Distributed Hunter Trujillo • Edited

Software would be a lot less complicated to develop if you didn't have to use the "industry standard" approach that billion dollar corporations developed to serve billions of users.

And it's pretty clear that developers will martyr themselves for their religions.

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patarapolw profile image
Pacharapol Withayasakpunt

At this point, I don't even know if I need SPA <Link /> in my multi-page website?

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qm3ster profile image
Mihail Malo

Static hosting is cheaper and faster at every level and scale.
Why would you interpolate html on your server?
You're winning nothing, it's not even less complexity.

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leastbad profile image
leastbad

That sounds like a great strategy, if you're only hosting static documents.

Beyond that, I can loudly declare that I can cast all AD&D 2nd mage spells up to 6th level - but for some reason not the 4th level spells - and have the same amount of credibility as your assertion that I'm "winning nothing".

Seriously, have you ever built anything credibly sophisticated with a server app? I don't believe for a moment that you would voluntarily choose to use whatever nifty combination of Vue + Firebase or whatever you have convinced yourself is best if you could see how quickly we can build reactive applications using Rails, TurboLinks and Stimulus vs maintaining client state and serializing everything as JSON "because better".

Honestly, I don't think your position has a leg to stand on.

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qm3ster profile image
Mihail Malo

That is a view of nothing but pure inertia.
Imagine using last resort hacks like TurboLinks on a greenfield project and claiming you're "using the platform".
Will you have API endpoints? Yes. Will you have some interactivity on the client, including network calls (without a seamless page reload)? Yes.
Why add to that a third thing in a separate language?
And this scales from "one person updating both the API and the UI in one commit" to "here's the GraphQL/Swagger/gRPC spec from the team for that backend feature, use it to generate mocks".
You're paying extra money for servers just to have more things to worry about, avoid scary things like offline-first, websockets, p2p and for what? To say "look, mom, I am generating HTML just like WordPress"?
What's one thing that's easier to do on a frontend server than anywhere else?

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qm3ster profile image
Mihail Malo

That is a view of nothing but pure inertia.
Imagine using last resort hacks like TurboLinks on a greenfield project and claiming you're "using the platform".
Will you have API endpoints? Yes. Will you have some interactivity on the client, including network calls (without a seamless page reload)? Yes.
Why add to that a third thing in a separate language?
And this scales from "one person updating both the API and the UI in one commit" to "here's the GraphQL/Swagger/gRPC spec from the team for that backend feature, use it to generate mocks".
You're paying extra money for servers just to have more things to worry about, avoid scary things like offline-first, websockets, p2p and for what? To say "look, mom, I am generating HTML just like WordPress"?
What's one thing that's easier to do on a frontend server than anywhere else?

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leastbad profile image
leastbad

Mihail, you've been doing this since 2015. Is it possible that you still have some things to learn? Right now you're equating mature/stable == old/bad. You've come up at a time when it's been super trendy to push everything to the client, and I promise you that this works in a pendulum cycle. Meanwhile, if you keep drinking your own KoolAid, you'll convince yourself that you just happened to luck out and learn the methodology that you're going to fight to prove is the best. It's not a good look, and long term, it's not the hill you want to die on.

Also, this notion that everything has to be done with microservices and all-static front-end everything is just the regurgitation of propaganda. The massive pushback against this march towards the edge is already well underway. I've been building and scaling teams since the late 90s. You don't have to agree with me, but you don't get to squirt testosterone all over the carpet and bleat about how my views are "pure inertia". You're being a dick.

Straight-up, the first and best thing that comes to mind that is easier to do with server rendered UI is state management. You can suggest that Turbolinks is a "last resort hack" all you want, but frankly it's just not a credible statement. Using Turbolinks and a library like StimulusReflex, I can build reactive user experiences that load faster and smaller, render and update faster, and I drastically reduce the complexity of the logic by not keeping any state on the client at all. It's a breeze to develop, it's easy to employ Russian doll caching, it's actually a lot of fun, and gosh, it's good enough for 6 of the top 10 YC companies of all time.

Honestly, everything I do with Rails, TurboLinks, StimulusReflex and Stimulus, I can build it faster than a team of JS devs. I'm not sure that I believe you've ever actually tried these tools, or you wouldn't be saying what you're saying.

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ben profile image
Ben Halpern

How about this one: Global variables aren't so bad.

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citizen428 profile image
Michael Kohl

Good that we’re using languages without concurrency 😂

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fleshmecha profile image
• Edited

This is nuclear: I love to use HTML and CSS in a multi page application, the way they did it in the 2000s. It's simple, easy and fast for the user.

I can make buttons without JavaScript by using <form action="nextpage.html">, and Netlify Analytics doesn't require any JavaScript to be included in the page. Javascript is render blocking, but HTML is fast and beautiful. It's pretty easy for me to maintain a 100 on Lighthouse, PageSpeed, Pingdom etc. with an HTML first philosophy.

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gmartigny profile image
Guillaume Martigny

I don't get why use <form> to make buttons? You can just style a <a> with css to look like a button and not break accessibility.

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fleshmecha profile image

I run my website through the wave test for checking accessibility and it’s never said form action to change pages is a problem. Can you explain why this breaks accessibility in your view? I’d love to learn something new.

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gmartigny profile image
Guillaume Martigny

I'm not an accessibility expert. But the simpler the better for screen-reader.

<form action="page.html">
    <button type="submit">Click</button>
</form>

vs

<a href="page.html">Click</a>

What's make you prefer the former one ?

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codemouse92 profile image
Jason C. McDonald

Amen.

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tommykolkman profile image
Tommy Kolkman

I really like this approach. No overhead whatsoever!

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alvaromontoro profile image
Alvaro Montoro • Edited

(Controversial?) unpopular opinion: Linux is overrated. For regular end users, it is overcomplicated and not particularly useful. And Linux users many times behave like the tech version of vapers/vegans/CrossFit. 😳

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piguicorn profile image
LogUI 🌈

As a Linux regular end user for years before programming and a vegan myself, I think you should meet new people. 😝

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alvaromontoro profile image
Alvaro Montoro • Edited

I should! I like meeting new people... especially if they like hating on Linux 😜

Now seriously, I don't have anything against Linux, I used it for years at a personal and academic level (Mandrake/Linex/Ubuntu). It is ok for servers/development, but I don't see it as an option for the average user.

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piguicorn profile image
LogUI 🌈

Maybe it depends on the person and/or Linux distribution. I have never been great on system administration but once I got used to Linux it was more comfortable than Windows (which I find overwhelming!).

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codemouse92 profile image
Jason C. McDonald

It is rather funny to see that assessment, seeing how many computer illiterates, many of them seniors, whom I've trained to use Ubuntu (in 15 minutes, no command line). They are not only proficient at using it even still, but vocally recommend it to others.

Not to say your opinion is invalid, Alvaro. :) Just maybe not wholly objective?

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alvaromontoro profile image
Alvaro Montoro • Edited

My opinion is completely subjective (and unpopular and controversial, seeing the comments 😊). It's more anecdotal, based on my personal experience, and heavily conditioned by the distributions that I used: Red Hat was a pain to set up (we even had a whole lab at school to do so); in Mandrake, when something went wrong, it went really wrong (and things went wrong often); Linex and Guadalinex were fun (there are some cool projects in Spain where they use them to introduce seniors in rural areas to technology); with Ubuntu everything was easy (compared to the others, it is the less Linux-like version of Linux); ...

Maybe if I had only tried Ubuntu first, I would have a different overview of Linux. But my first experiences with Red Hat and Mandrake were not that positive and they conditioned my view of it. There are a lot of distributions of Linux and not all of them are user-friendly.

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codemouse92 profile image
Jason C. McDonald

Heh. Valid. Many distros really aren't user friendly, I'll give ya that!

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cryptoquick profile image
Distributed Hunter Trujillo

Arch Linux is like an old car I know how to work on. When Windows breaks in a mysterious way, I have to look it up. I've tried to find the equivalent of journalctl on Windows, but it never seems to tell me anything worthwhile. When things break on Linux, half the time I don't even have to look it up to fix it.

Also, installing software from the terminal instead of having to go to a website and click the download link is a dream. Spotify, Discord, Telegram, all within easy reach with yay.

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mkenzo_8 profile image
mkenzo8
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cryptoquick profile image
Distributed Hunter Trujillo

I'm aware of it. It's nowhere near as good as pacman. Arguably, even homebrew is better. And that doesn't answer my question, where are the system logs? For example, Windows is awful to play games on, and sometimes they crash for no apparent reason. Sometimes the entire system resets. I've tried different graphics cards, taking the side panels off, upgraded to an 850W single-rail 80+ Titanium power supply, and it still crashes playing modern games. How am I supposed to develop on a system I can't even play games on, and there's no obvious way to see what the heck is happening?

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mkenzo_8 profile image
mkenzo8

Check this: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Event_Viewer
Your issues don't happen to all people btw

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cryptoquick profile image
Distributed Hunter Trujillo

"Your issues don't happen to all people btw"
... I don't even know what to say. Great sense of empathy there.
Software doesn't always work right for me all the time, but yeah, and maybe it's just me, and I'm just bad at computers, and I should just stop doing anything interesting with them and just stick with what I know.
Great attitude, kid. Hope that works out for ya.

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mkenzo_8 profile image
mkenzo8

I have never said you were bad at computers. Neither I meant to offend you. What I meant, is you cannot blame Windows just because you have an specific issue, because that's it, an specific issue, not all people have. Actually, the majority of people doesn't have it.
I hope it will eventually work for you, have a good day 😄

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mmohammadi9812 profile image
Mohammad Mohammadi

Well, it's actually underrated. The reason that it doesn't have so many GUI apps, just like windows does, is because it has fewer users, so companies don't bother to support Linux. And don't forget about how hard Microsoft has tried to win the desktop battle, by paying/convincing software/hardware companies for exclusive windows support.

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alvaromontoro profile image
Alvaro Montoro

Taking into account how spread it is on IT/servers, yes, it is definitely underrated. My comment was more directed at a personal computer level.

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patarapolw profile image
Pacharapol Withayasakpunt • Edited

Not really overcomplicated, IMO. It just lacks commercial support, both on hardware and software.

But if you don't care about LibreOffice or web apps, and your hardware is perfect (not bad WiFi, mouse pad or graphics), it might be OK for non-techies. You might not even notice the distro, or you can use a highly localized distro.

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David Johnston

Do you do any coding directly for linux use though? (eg. CI pipeline configuration, building docker images)?

Because if you're doing that anyway then using it for your day to day work, is actually simpler (because you don't have issues where it works on your CI but not on your local, and vice versa).

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Kevin Alemán

Microservices are not the future, nor the present... They are another good approach for some use case, not for all.

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Distributed Hunter Trujillo

I've worked at companies that have a "megamicroservice". It's an API so complex, it is a thousand times more complex because they tried to split it up into a thousand pieces.

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Kevin Alemán