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Jared Niervas
Jared Niervas

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As a software engineer, how quickly do you get left behind if you don’t constantly update your skills?

As a software engineer, how quickly do you get left behind if you don’t constantly update your skills?

Discussion (16)

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Ben Overmyer

You're asking the wrong question.

The implication in your question is that there are two options - constantly update your skills, or never update your skills.

The better question is "how often should I spend time learning new techniques and technologies?"

The answer to that question depends a bit on the person, but a good baseline is a few hours each month. Less than that, and you might not be making the best choices and creating more work for yourself later. More than that is fine, up to a point. You don't want to be spending more time learning new technology than you are solving problems for your employer. The caveat to that is if you're a new hire in your first 90 or so days; then, learning is all you should be expected to be doing.

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Jared Niervas Author

Thanks, so spot on!

On a similar note, I find it easier connecting with key engineering events happening across the world. I'm always on the lookout from: community.lohika.com/home/events

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Aaron Reese

It feels like about six hours! In reality i would say about 18 months for Wèb front end frameworks and toolchains. For infrastructute and database, more like 3-5 years.
Ironically for Microsoft PowerBI, Flow and Power Apps, 6 months is probably about the limit as these products are on a 4 week sprint release cycle.

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Jared Niervas Author

I feel you Aaron Reese - totally relatable.

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Ben Overmyer

You're assuming that technology is the only thing changing. There might be new approaches using existing technology. You need to keep on top of that, too.

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Jared Niervas Author

I agree, What a better way than to connect with peers — seniors in the industry they kinda challenge you get out of your comfort zone. Do you have any recommended communities? I'm currently on community.lohika.com/home/events

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bovermyer profile image
Ben Overmyer

Communities? Not really. I just pay attention to Hacker News and various subreddits.

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Jared Niervas Author

Thanks, really helpful.

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Samuel FAURE

The time it took me to read this question, I'm already old news. I should have spent that time learning the latest JS framework.

No, but seriously, I feel like people have a lot of pressure to stay up to date. As long as you don't live in a bubble, you'll be fine.

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Nathan Hedglin

Depends on your specialization.

Technology tends to have jumps more than smooth linear change. We jumped from backend rendering everything to JS frameworks. We jumped from on-premise to the cloud.

Frontend tends to change more rapidly. Backend improves but doesnt completely overhaul itself every few years.

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Jared Niervas Author

Thanks.

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Tamerlan Gudabayev

Sometimes it feels overwhelming, but I figured everything is made up of foundations. So if you get your foundations right, everything else becomes easier.

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Jared Niervas Author

Sounds you have it figured out.

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John Peters

As quickly as you want a salary bump by taking a new job. The best way to find out which skills is to interview once a year.

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Jared Niervas Author

This is definitely me.