DEV Community

Cover image for Is it still worth learning web development if there are already tools that do not require knowing any coding?
Heritier Akilimali
Heritier Akilimali

Posted on

Is it still worth learning web development if there are already tools that do not require knowing any coding?

Definitely. The "no-code" tools have existed for over fifty years under various names, and, despite their promise, they never have and probably never will deliver on that promise.

It's an interesting question: if you were not a web developer, how would you verify whether the no-code program does a good job?

With no-code platforms, sites can become complicated and slow, which then leads to a lower search score, resulting in fewer people viewing the site.

The use of no-code tools may be effective for building a simple MVP or landing page, but learning web development will allow you to have more creative and technical control over your website.

Will a no-code tool be easy to use to create 3D UI animations? No, but it might suffice just to have a title with a shadow.

Can we implement a graph database using a no-code tool that lets you focus on how data is stored? Probably not, but we could store some basic information in an excel sheet for convenience's sake.

What about building a startup that supports millions of users? What would be the best way so we can reduce downtime and increase reliability while handling the traffic and usage of our app?
Due to the increasing complexity of features and the increasing amount of customization of UI, we find that no-code tools are simply unable to handle the task.

So, yes, you absolutely should be a web developer if you're curious about these questions and want to delve into the field on a deep level.

No-code tools allow non-developers to update content by using a templated web page that is built by web developers. It is just content to update.

As such, yes, it's worth it if you want to be a heavily in-demand player in the tech industry.
Having no code tools is nothing short of ammunition for the demands of web developers. If no code tools are available, who is going to build them?

As a result of the constant change in technologies as well as the requirement to constantly learn more and hone your skillset, it is clear that web development is still going to generate opportunities for developers in the near future.
Furthermore, it is also essential to mention that there are plenty of different pathways you can follow if you are interested in becoming a web developer.

Discussion (3)

Collapse
ingosteinke profile image
Ingo Steinke • Edited on

The use of no-code tools may be effective for building a simple MVP or landing page, but learning web development will allow you to have more creative and technical control over your website.

Exactly, totally agree! No-code / low-code tools are great for new projects, small startups, with a small team, and a small budget, to build a nice and professional website.

I have been working with WordPress, which can be customized with no code depending on themes and plugins (which can make the website slow and hard to understand and configure), or by a web developer, adding custom CSS on top (workarounds rather than elegant codes) or developing (child) themes which gives you full control over style, markup, JavaScript and even PHP backend code and possible custom fields in the database. But you have to understand, extend and tweak an existing system.

I have also used WebFlow, which has a very appealing user interface that looks like a design tool and offers UI controls to tweak CSS settings and add functionality like web forms processors, and it even has preview and custom styles for adaptive breakpoints.

But to me as a developer, using WebFlow is like a nightmare. You can't do tasks in parallel, can't open mutiple editor tabs at the same time, and it always takes a lot of clicks to achieve a goal. As soon as you try to add more than a few lines of JavaScript, it's time to eject the application and continue to work on it as a project without WebFlow (never tried yet, but they say it is possible).

web development is still going to generate opportunities for developers in the near future.

Definitely! Customers need developers for complex projects, and no-code tool vendors need developers to code the tools. So no-code tools are valuable software for specific situations, but we will never lose our jobs as developers just because no-code solutions exist.

Collapse
heritio profile image
Heritier Akilimali Author

Yes, agreed. And also taking into account the fact that web3 is being eyed by aloot of companies while being a new field within computer science and web development, it almost seems like there is always more to learn and the nocode tools will still lag behind. I am gratefull that our future as webdevs is looking bright. :)

Collapse
syxaxis profile image
George Johnson

Let me put it this way, any point in learning how to work with wood if you can buy all your furniture ready to assemble from IKEA? Judging by the amount of wood working power tools you can buy ( most of which appear to be located in my father's workshop! ) , I'd say there's a thriving market for wood working skills to make bespoke items despite most people buying ready made items.

Most people are happy with "off the peg" on most items in their lives, however some people want to learn something for for educational reasons to understand how something works, others want to offer bespoke options to others as there's money in it and others is simply having that skill to always add the final bespoke touch to every project.