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Ubuntu is harder than Arch

haxnet profile image HaxNet ・Updated on ・1 min read

Did I get your attention?
I actually used Ubuntu as my very first Linux Distro. Now after using Arch, I can't imagine going back to Ubuntu. I've tried using it and other derivatives of it. And I find it very hard to use.

Yes installing Arch is harder...much harder, but after that everything is just easier to use. Especially installing programs.

I don't even use a Desktop Environment. I just use a simple i3wm and I can imagine using anything else anymore. I tried other DEs and just can't get the feelings.

Update: Arguing about stability is a weak argument. You do not have to constantly update. Just because you can, doesn't mean you have to. + if you installed Arch (vanilla, not manjaro) on your own you pretty much know 99% of what is going on with your system. You will know how to fix things.

If you said you used Arch, but was actually referring to Manjaro, then you really can can't say you are an Arch-user.

Discussion (60)

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otumianempire profile image
Otu Michael • Edited

yeah, you did get my attention. I use Ubuntu and never used Arch - (I shall use arch in the future). Installing Ubuntu is not difficult and installing programs on Ubuntu not also difficult. I can't imagine going back to Ubuntu. Try Ubuntu again.

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leob profile image
leob

Totally agree, both installing Ubuntu itself, and installing programs, is trivially easy.

If you know how to type apt-get install in a terminal then you know how to install programs under Ubuntu. And the community is way bigger, which means that if you run into problems it's easier to get help.

Ubuntu FTW ... :-)

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haxnet profile image
HaxNet Author

Ubuntu needs too many repos for certain programs.
You should try Arch. Ubuntu isn't hard, my post was to be sarcastic, but it's true I can't imagine going going back to it. Arch is superior in every way

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leob profile image
leob

Superior in every way, in which ways then? Be more specific, or you're not convincing me.

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haxnet profile image
HaxNet Author • Edited

Just the repos alone is already better

Arch is a rolling release, Ubuntu is a point release.

Did you ever even use Arch? Or installing it turned you away? Because if you did used Arch, you wouldn't be offended(from the sound of your comments)

In Arch, if you run into problems, you pretty much know what's wrong. Because you've built Arch from scratch.

There's plenty of help enough for the average user. If you are constantly seeking for help, then stick with Ubuntu.

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leob profile image
leob

I'm not offended :-) but I was just curious about the reasons why it's better ... and "better" is often completely subjective, it depends a lot on your goals, priorities and preferences, what's great for one person may suck for someone else.

By the way, is it Arch based on Debian (like Ubuntu), with all of the packages that come with it?

If someone wants to convince me then I like to hear reasons and arguments rather than just "it's better". And of course there's inertia, most people stick with what they're familiar with unless something else is vastly superior. Most of the time these things are a toss-up and one choice isn't that much better of even different than the other one.

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haxnet profile image
HaxNet Author

Arch is Arch, I know Ubuntu is Debian based.

Honestly, I didn't know anything about Arch. I was an Ubuntu user for a long time. I used all kinds of Ubuntu based distros.

I learned Arch WHILE I was installing it. Lol

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otumianempire profile image
Otu Michael

I used to use the arch UI/theme on my Ubuntu.
On a scale of 1 to 5, would you recommend arch to a friend?

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haxnet profile image
HaxNet Author

Definitely. Awesome OS

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drtsinx98 profile image
Pritish Joshi

Agreed...

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vinukathejana profile image
Vinuka Kodituwakku

Its not that,Arch rocks manπŸ˜‡ definitely try it

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haxnet profile image
HaxNet Author

Are you using vanilla arch or arch-based distro?

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pratham82 profile image
Prathamesh Mali

Not harder but more annoying and bloated πŸ˜πŸ˜‚, arch is much more like AOSP roms and Ubuntu is like a MiUi which had lots of packages pre-installed. The learning is curve is steep with arch, finding solutions on archwiki and youtube but you'll get used to it. Ubuntu is more Noemie feiendly distroπŸ˜‚ no hate though, Ive been through the phase and anyone wants to progress in linux ecosystem they should try out arch it's pain in the ass in start but when you get used to it you can't go back.

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haxnet profile image
HaxNet Author

The more I learned using Arch, the less I remember for Ubuntu and was like why didn't I use Arch first?

I think I tried installing Arch more than 6-8 times and it was a pain.

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pratham82 profile image
Prathamesh Mali

Me too man i've watched a lot of videos on youtube for installing after so many failed attempts I got this time right, and previous manjaro exp help too because of same package managers and other configs.

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haxnet profile image
HaxNet Author

something i learned is that you need to just read the wiki, Youtube videos are helpful but not complete. The wiki is key.

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pratham82 profile image
Prathamesh Mali

Yes definitely.

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aghost7 profile image
Jonathan Boudreau

The biggest issue I have with arch is it not being used for any professional work. Why should I learn pacman when I'll have to use apt/dnf anyways? Arch will never be more than an enthusiast distro imo.

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haxnet profile image
HaxNet Author

Please tell me why Arch can't be used for any professional work.
pacman is much simpler to use and plus that they wrapper for it, I personally use yay and it is really easy to use instead of sudo apt-get install/upgrade
sudo add-apt-repository "deb blahblahblah.com/ saucy-update universe multiverse"
and then making sure to sudo apt-get update. this is just plain annoying.
No it isn't an enthusiast distro. Did you install arch before? if not, don't knock it without trying it.

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aghost7 profile image
Jonathan Boudreau • Edited

Please tell me why Arch can't be used for any professional work.

It isn't stable enough to maintain on hundreds of machines.

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haxnet profile image
HaxNet Author

That's a weak argument; non Arch users do not have any problems with stability. But feel free to stick with Ubuntu.

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aghost7 profile image
Jonathan Boudreau

I'm not really sure what you mean, the software industry avoids rolling releases for no reason in your opinion? I have tried arch, but I didn't really see a benefit to it so went back to something more useful for me. Manjaro was interesting too, but my system broke at some point and I couldn't be bothered to fix it.

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haxnet profile image
HaxNet Author

Manjaro is not Arch, that's why when it "broke" you wouldn't bother fixing it. Manjaro would be the equivalent of Ubuntu.
Arch would be the equilavent of Debian.

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aghost7 profile image
Jonathan Boudreau

To clarify, I tried both arch and manjaro and neither worked out for me.

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Chittoji Murali Sree Krishna

Yeah I agree, but ubuntu ain't harder for normal usage, but it's harder for installing few packages, specifically using snapshots and alot of other stuff, but arch have a wonderful user repository (Aur), all though it have a good repos and wiki, but it's not as stable as debian based, & sometimes user might end up in errors while system upgrades, but can roll back using timeshift's , I probably I agree the arch is easy in installing apps or updates, but rest all same to same.

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HaxNet Author

Earlier I commented about stablility, if you are runnin' vanilla arch, you shouldn't really have much of a problem with stablility, in fact, I think it is more stable because I get to choose if I want to upgrade any packages and even if the packages messes up something, I can always roll back and I knew what happened.

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simranss

I'm an ubuntu user since the past 1 year. I actually started using linux because I wanted to use arch but was scared because of a lot people claiming that its pretty difficult and is not a beginner's choice. So yeah I'm kind of waiting for maybe 1 more year of using linux so that I can make a switch. By the way switching from windows to ubuntu was one of my best decisions. It's just so fast and smooth. And I can't wait to join the arch community, I'm just waiting that I can be more prepared for it. I've heard so much about it. And I'm surely gonna switch, just not now, but yeah soon.

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haxnet profile image
HaxNet Author

I recommend using an Arch based distros such as Anarchy, endeavour, Archlabs, or Manjaro. Ubuntu is Debian based.

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cmuralisree profile image
Chittoji Murali Sree Krishna

if you want to use vanilla arch then these are the installation steps: codepen.io/murali-sree-krishna/pen... ,

i use this install base system, later i change to desktop or window manager depends on work

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simranss profile image
simranss

Oh gosh I finally installed arch today. I am so happy to join the arch community.

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haxnet profile image
HaxNet Author

What DE are you using?

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cmuralisree profile image
Chittoji Murali Sree Krishna

I am not using any DE, I am using i3WM

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haxnet profile image
HaxNet Author

That's awesome. I use only i3wm as well. Well i3-gap. Same stuff.

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slavius profile image
Slavius • Edited

I don't remember anymore; can you upgrade only system packages in Arch to get latest kernel improvements/fixes and security patches?
In e.g. Gentoo Linux you can do emerge -avu @system to update kernel, compiler(s), glibc, init system and core system utilities and libraries (like ssh, ssl, etc.) but not X, desktop managers, browsers or other user installed packages.

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haxnet profile image
HaxNet Author

Do you mean;

linux

Linux-lts
Linux-hardened
Linux-zen

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slavius profile image
Slavius

That is just a Linux kernel. Operating system is much more than that.

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haxnet profile image
HaxNet Author • Edited

I know OS is just more than that. Sorry I'm typing on my phone and not really looking into just partial upgrades. And why would you want to do that especially on a rolling release?

Arch is all about how you want to make it.
But only doing partial upgrades will typically cause the system to break.

I update on a daily basis that's why my system is stable. Literally takes 3 seconds to update

sudo pacman -Syu --noconfirm

Update package list and upgrade all packages afterwards.

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slavius profile image
Slavius

Sometimes you don't want to update everything. I have several SWs that I intentionally mask and hold back because they are less stable in new versions. Especially with Arch that does not care about backporting fixes and rather prefers rolling forward it is crucial to be able to pause updates. For this you have ignore options with pacman.
In modern day when most of my SW runs as FlatPack, .appImage, Snap package or Docker image you don't risk breaking the system by not updating.

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ankuryu profile image
Sunil Gandhi

I totally agree with you, u can build it to your specs, beautiful wikki and forum to help you get out any problem. Rolling release. Who could ask for more. I too tried Ubuntu first, but now I even have Arch on my Raspberry Pi

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Shrihan Kumar Padhy • Edited

I like Arch and Arch based distros, fairly because:

Ubuntu: sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade
Arch: sudo pacman -Syu

Ubuntu: sudo apt-get install software-properties-common; sudo add-apt-repository ppa:some/repository(Run the second command for every new software not found in the official repos)
Arch: sudo pacman -S git;git clone https://aur.archlinux.org/yay.git;cd yay;makepkg -si(No need to do anything again. Almost every software is found in the AUR)

Ubuntu: sudo apt-get install ...
Arch: pacman -S ...

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haxnet profile image
HaxNet Author • Edited

Agreed. I love using yay I haven't had any trouble finding programs.

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EelGoodInk πŸ¦‘

My Linux experience is perfect for this article. I started off in highschool using Ubuntu but in my mid 20's realized I wanted to know more about GNU/Linux so I Installed my first Arch distro on an old netbook which compared to what I knew at the time, it was like having my Linux 3rd eye opened. I now knew how to perform almost anything from the command line, so going back to Ubuntu should be a cake walk right? I cannot tell you how hard it was for me to officially install anything on Ubuntu without needing to know file hierarchy structure. Some Debian packages just aren't as well maintained so you build and install on Ubuntu, it doesn't always go as planned.

This is where Ubuntu can now teach you what makes Arch so special. The AUR combined with the necessity of PKG Build files allows you to have the most up to date method to running anything on your system. Basically your biggest comparison you can make between Debian and Arch is that Debian focuses strictly on stability while Arch is truly bleeding edge. That doesn't mean Arch is unstable, you can choose to install stable packages or to only install from tested package repositorys. I'm sure there are ways to do this in Ubuntu, but since Ubuntu adds that extra layer of testing and stability you can expect it to be a while before the most up to date software runs bug free on your system. Especially if you use any of the desktop environment variants Ubuntu has to offer, but that's a whole different conversation

That is my personal experience and I know I have much much more to learn. I don't even know how to properly make my own PKG build files right now, all files I used were found from other users and have at the most been edited by me to work with my system. I think it'll be a huge step in my learning if I can truly comprehend PKG Build files and how they work with Arch's package manager.

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HaxNet Author

That doesn't mean Arch is unstable, you can choose to install stable packages or to only install from tested package repositorys.

This is the biggest argument/excuse that Debian/Ubuntu users seems to always use to say Arch isn't stable. You nailed it on this one.

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Hendrey Chikane

I have used Pop_OS, Ubuntu, Deepin during 2020, they are all good and solid but I had drivers issues on dell xps 15 9550, especially bluetooth. I switched to Manjaro few days ago, and so far I'm happy about it. The support for Snap, Flatpak and AUR is awesome. And for some reason, my battery life has increased without having to do some tweaks.

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HaxNet Author

I am not a fan of Manjaro, I have the Manjaro ARM for my pinebook pro, but I haven't touched that pinebook pro after 1 month of having it. Manjaro is just ehh to me.

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Mateusz Kwiatkowski

I have used Mint, Manjaro, Arc and recently Deepin and I can't say that Arch is easier to use than Ubuntu. For me it is exactly the opposite. Well, to be honest I like Deepin the most but it needs more resources to run smoothly than the other distros and in my company you get Ubuntu by default und you can't change it.

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haxnet profile image
HaxNet Author

I see, but install Vanilla Arch on your personal PC. Best of both linux worlds. Arch and Debian.

I have Kali on my laptop and Arch as my main driver on my PC

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pontakornth

I consider switch because I don't want to add more PPA to the sytem ( I use Pop_OS.). One good thing about Arch is it has official Minecraft launcher. I use Linux desktop for gaming because it's better for currently potato computer.

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haxnet profile image
HaxNet Author

make the switch, you will love it. Do the Vanilla Arch install, don't use Manjaro otherwise you won't ever learn the system and won't have the pleasure to actually build it from scratch.

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Syed Faraaz Ahmad • Edited

Although I've never installed or used arch/manjaro etc I've heard great things about AUR. I'm a PopOS user, so I get latest packages with Ubuntu's stability

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HaxNet Author • Edited

While true stability can be argued, but Arch doesn't update in the background.

Arch users considers it more stable because we custom build the Distro so it tends to have less bloat and you know what you put in it. This is contrary to many other different distributions where something you didn't even know you had could break and not know how to fix it.

Easier to fix something you made, that's why Arch users thinks it's actually more stable.

Best analogy is this,

Auto mechanic driving a stick= Arch or any self installed OS
Average driver driving automatic = other prepackaged distros

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otumianempire profile image
Otu Michael

Ubuntu stability... at the end, it's what you use.

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akio333 profile image
Akio333

On surface ubuntu seems easy and intuitive. But it sucks when comes to installing github programs or getting latest bleeding edge softwares. And they did nerfed distro by using snaps and other bloat under name of security. Arch on the other hand is really minimalist. You choose what you want. Aur is best❀️. And just works with bleeding edge softwares without breaking.

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haxnet profile image
HaxNet Author

I concur, plus you can always install using git or install deb packages as well. I did it a few times where a software was only for deb and I just downloaded and installed it myself.

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rabioli profile image
Rabioli

Dude, arch is cool and the aur is a blessing but having to check updates every single time and being with the constant feeling of unsettleness because your system can go to shit is really not cool and in no way superior in any way to Ubuntu... if you would have mentioned Manjaro however this wouldn't be as much of a troll post.

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haxnet profile image
HaxNet Author • Edited

Why do you have to check updates every single time? I sure didn't..
What difference would it make had I mentioned Manjaro? I don't even like Manjaro.

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leob profile image
leob

Hundred percent subjective :-)

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jawhelan profile image
jawhelan

I see more apps for umbuntu. I worried I will have less apps.

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haxnet profile image
HaxNet Author

how many apps do you really need? AUR has pretty much all of it.
I currently have 1175 packages installed, how many do you have?
What app do you think you need that might not be in AUR, because I am 99% sure they have it.
If not, you can always install deb packages in arch.