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101 Tips For Being A Great Programmer (& Human)

Emma Bostian ✨ on July 09, 2019

1. Get good at Googling Being a programmer is all about learning how to search for the answers to your questions. By learning to Google ...
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yaser profile image
Yaser Al-Najjar • Edited

Love the whole list...
Bunch of valuable points ❤️

I would add this one:

102 Do Physical Exercises

Preferably everyday (or at least 3 days a week).

Our jobs require sitting most of the times... And, in years this will have severe effects on the body.

I'm sure everyone loves a specific sport that he would love doing on a frequent basis.

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javinpaul profile image
javinpaul

100 push-up, 100 sit-ups, and 10km Run twice a week will make you one-punch-man :-)

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motss profile image
Rong Sen Ng

And be ready to be bald. LOL

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yogyogi profile image
yogyogi

Perfect comment.

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mbougarne profile image
Mourad Bougarne

Loool!!! All the S-heroes don't believe it and want me do?!

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Tommi Tallgren

I agree on this list, and Yours 102 (could be in the 2nd in the list already)
I'd add:

103 Sleep enough!

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willvincent profile image
Will Vincent

The reality is what's needed is GOOD sleep, not enough sleep.

"Sleeping as little as 5 hours per night can be better for you than sleeping 8"

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tommitallgren profile image
Tommi Tallgren • Edited

Very true,
Your readiness depends on how well you recover (Mentally/Physically) during sleep. Surprisingly many factors have to be in order:

  • Enough hours, deep and rem stages
  • Get your pulse down early (during the deep sleep stage)
  • Get your Harth Rate Variation up (recovers your brain) etc,

I've been improving it by knowing what effects on those and using Oura to track it (Anyone knows about that nordic high-tech startup? ouraring.com/ )

For me and most of us those are just simple things:

  • Go early to bed, and always around the same time
  • Enough sleep in hours
  • No screentime (definitely no emails/work) before going to bed (Stress is lowering my HRV ;/ )
  • No sports (heavy) before at least 3 hours before going to bed.

My last night stats (just a few of them):
Oura screenshot

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muth0mi profile image
Oliver Muthomi

What app is this?

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nickpalenchar profile image
Nick Palenchar

+99!
Sleep is the key to almost every problem in life. I prioritize it over literally everything.

Natural methods are best (easy on the melatonin) and I personally enjoy the US military method of sleeping I found here

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yaser profile image
Yaser Al-Najjar • Edited

HELL YEAH!

I'm astonished at the amount of programmers who sleep at 5 AM then wake up like 9 AM... yes, this could work, but it's NEVER sustainable in the long run.

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Gabouchet

Sleep is for weak ^^

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iamcoderanddev profile image
Nick Williams

Strong people Also sleep dude

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stilldreaming1 profile image
still-dreaming-1 • Edited

One good way to get some of your exercise in is after each pomodoro, for your break, do 50 jumping jacks as fast as you can, and then sit right back done and start another pomo. I've started switching it up and doing 10 pushups as fast as I can instead, and eventually want to work in situps. The key for me is to not have a pomo going while deciding what my priority is, checking email, or getting ready to work on a specific thing. Then in order to get the maximum productivity out of myself I decide on a goal which is a piece of my current priority project, which will take between 3-5 pomos. Any less than that and I lose productivity, any more and it is not as fun because I get worn out and have to take a longer break in between. After I complete my goal, I take a real break where I do something that involves my other senses and relaxes my brain. For example I might take the dog out to go potty, or wash a few dishes, or brush my teeth, or get dressed for the day. If you work from home you can try out starting work in your pajamas and then start getting showered and dressed and stuff on your breaks.

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dzhavat profile image
Dzhavat Ushev

Yes! This is really important!

Also, realizing that we’re more than just developers.

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tirthbodawala profile image
Tirth Bodawala

So true

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stgogm profile image
Santiago G. Marín

This should definitively be on the list! Along with the sleep part. Mind and body health is really important is you want to be good at anything.

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krishna kakade

include 103
learn how to post questions on stackoverflow otherwise credits/reputation will go in --
Jumping is the best exercise

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codemouse92 profile image
Jason C. McDonald

I saw the title and thought "Huh, 101? I wonder how many of these tips are actually good?"

ALL OF THEM, apparently! Great post. This is now at the top of my list of articles to give to new programmers.

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Ahmed Ehtesam

Same

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dowenb profile image
Benjamin Dowen

This

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Alexander Sandberg

Awesome tips! Thanks for sharing, Emma! 😍

My personal favorites:

"39. Take breaks"

So much this. 🙌 It can be difficult to stop working when you just love what you're doing. But more often than not, breaks make you even more productive in the long run. Consistency is key, and you won't be able to keep up an unhealthy habit/routine.

"83. Don't compare yourself to others"

With today's connected society through social media, it's hard to not compare your own accomplishments with others'. But the only way to succeed yourself is to do the actual work—there are no shortcuts.

And remember that we all have something unique to give. Embrace that, don't wish you were in someone else's shoes!

"96. Code for accessibility"

No one should be left behind in this quickly emerging world ❤️

merri profile image
Vesa Piittinen • Edited

Are you sure you hate exercising? Often when somebody says they hate something they have bad memories, most likely due to poorly behaving people around. Are you letting these experiences control the rest of your life and keep you hating exercising, all the while the lack of moving adds far more issues on top of the asthma?

You can keep your current opinion, but over time your body would be like a code base that remains unmaintained with no refactoring at all, only adding up spaghetti solutions on top of another when you're trying to fix issues without admitting there is a core issue that needs a rewrite.

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Dave Parr

This is a fantastic list. Out of 101 you hit 99 percent bang on imho.

From my personal past experience and for my future career there are only 2 refinements I would make.

Under promise and overdeliver:
In specific working environments I would strive to "precisely promise, and precisely deliver".

In agile companies 'accurate' measures of the (ideal) effort something takes to do are valuable. If I say something will take longer than it will, this has knock on effects to other people relying on my estimation. Features are delayed needlessly, customers wait longer etc.

I'm all for few meetings but I think it's harder to generate accurate tasks/features/stories in these methods. Agile values face to face > remote asynchronous messages, and I've definitely seen the value in that.

Even so. 99.99... % agreement is miles more than I find in many other articles, so good work!

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yucer profile image
yucer • Edited

) Good work!

I guess you are one step near to write a book.

I know some books that did start with a list like this, laterl some items became paragraphs, sections and chapters.

Regarding:

  1. Take breaks

A good technique is to put a bottle of water in your desk and drink a lot.

Drinking water is very good for health and your bladder would remember the break.. Because you'll need to go to the bad.

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Ben Overmyer

Excellent list. Also, thank you for breaking it up occasionally with images; that's a thoughtful touch.

I am particularly fond of #83 (Don't Compare Yourself to Others), and wish I had learned that a decade or two earlier.

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Ken Bellows

Holy content Batman! How long did this take to write? Was it a background thing over a couple weeks?

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Emma Bostian ✨ Author

I wrote the tips over a few hours but it just took me a while to put it into a proper format :)

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Kwame

I was blown. Still am.

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_shahroznawaz profile image
Shahroz Nawaz

I would add one more tip in your awesome tips :D

Shutdown all social links while programming (Facebook, Twitter, Insta etc)

They distract alot just about when you catch the point a message bumps up. :D

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taillogs profile image
Ryland G

Shouldn't you mention @NinaLimpi at least once, considering almost all of these images are hers and have no attribution?

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Emma Bostian ✨ Author
  1. I always mention UnDraw whenever anyone asks about the images.
  2. I promote her on Twitter all the time
  3. If you read the license, it says that no attribution is necessary.

I’m not sure if you meant to call me out rudely but it came off that way. I would never intentionally “not attribute” someone’s work to them. I have read the license.

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taillogs profile image
Ryland G
  1. I have no way of knowing that
  2. I have no way of knowing that
  3. Obviously its hard for me to know about the license of an unattributed image. For the record I did look (briefly) before I posted my original comment and couldn’t find licensing info.

Not sure how what I said, came off as rude. I asked a direct question followed by an assertion of fact.

I appreciate your reply but I still stand by my original position, license or not. If it were one or two pictures, I would never have said anything. But this post is almost a portfolio for her. I’m sure if you asked her, she would come here and tell me she knows you and doesn’t care. But if it was my friend, their name would be somewhere in this post.

I hope you understand my position better.

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estevanmaito profile image
Estevan Maito • Edited

Hey bud, you're wrong. Accept and get on.

What you think is right or wrong is not the case. The creator of the illustrations doens't want attribution. Read it here: undraw.co/license

"Oh BuT hOw CoUlD i KnOw?"

Exactly. If it were for you to know, the license were to be "give attribution".

Also, if you've really searched BRIEFLY for "undraw", Google gives you the option to go directly to the license page. Which ironically, is the number 1 rule of the article.

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taillogs profile image
Ryland G

At no point have I been hostile or derogatory. Yet, you've felt the need to come in and essentially bully me because I have an opposing viewpoint to yours. In my comment, I clearly convey that I tried to search before saying anything.

Regardless of whether I'm wrong or right, this is not a mature response.

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Scott Simontis

I think the challenge is that reading text on the Internet conveys no context whatsoever. I think a lot of people are rude in e-mail, but the truth is that they are trying to write short and to-the-point messages and not waste a ton of time on the e-mail itself when there are far more pressing matters to attend to.

Also, I personally find unsolicited advice-giving can be a minefield. It can make it seem like an attack on the author or come across as arrogant and it makes assumptions. Questions are my favorite way to open a dialog when I think something should be done in a different manner.

In this situation, you could have said something along the lines of "I have a very disciplined system for citing and crediting tools I use, and I noticed you didn't attribute X. Could you please tell me a little bit more about your citation process?" Then you can engage in a discussion that is hopefully productive, respectful and a benefit to all who read.

Seek to understand, rather than to be understood. Approach all topics with a beginner's mind. Be aware of the fact that you oftentimes do not know that you do not know something, if that makes sense.

When a conversation starts getting emotionally charged, take a step back. Go outside, I hear sunlight is really nice and I should be getting more of it :P Assumptions tend to lead to more assumptions which tends to lead to looking like an ass.

Lastly, consider appropriate venues. If you think someone is attributing wrong, a PM would probably be a much nicer way to get this across. No one likes public criticism. I know from the talks we've had together you're a good dude and you didn't mean ill-will, but it came across differently unfortunately. See if you can take something away from this experience!

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taillogs profile image
Ryland G • Edited

I always appreciate your insight Scott, thanks for taking the time to evaluate the situation rationally.

I think the challenge is that reading text on the Internet conveys no context whatsoever. I think a lot of people are rude in e-mail, but the truth is that they are trying to write short and to-the-point messages and not waste a ton of time on the e-mail itself when there are far more pressing matters to attend to.

I agree. Although I still believe that there was nothing "rude" or "unrude" about what I said. It was definitely opinionated and direct, which is not something everyone appreciates.

Also, I personally find unsolicited advice-giving can be a minefield. It can make it seem like an attack on the author or come across as arrogant and it makes assumptions. Questions are my favorite way to open a dialog when I think something should be done in a different manner

To be fair, I did start with a question, so it's not just the form that matters. Again, agree with the overall sentiment. In fact, this observation is so great that I might write a blog post about it.

In this situation, you could have said something along the lines of "I have a very disciplined system for citing and crediting tools I use, and I noticed you didn't attribute X. Could you please tell me a little bit more about your citation process?" Then you can engage in a discussion that is hopefully productive, respectful and a benefit to all who read.

You're obviously right.

Seek to understand, rather than to be understood. Approach all topics with a beginner's mind. Be aware of the fact that you oftentimes do not know that you do not know something, if that makes sense.

I assume I know nothing, because no one does.

When a conversation starts getting emotionally charged, take a step back. Go outside, I hear sunlight is really nice and I should be getting more of it :P Assumptions tend to lead to more assumptions which tends to lead to looking like an ass.

I'm not emotional about this at all. I've played far too many hours of online games to get tilted by interactions on the internet (for better and worse).

Lastly, consider appropriate venues. If you think someone is attributing wrong, a PM would probably be a much nicer way to get this across. No one likes public criticism. I know from the talks we've had together you're a good dude and you didn't mean ill-will, but it came across differently unfortunately. See if you can take something away from this experience!

The first thing I tried was to direct message her. She has her DM's closed. That's a personal choice, but also voids that argument. It's not like I went to the Dev.to staff and complained or tweeted publicly about this issue. I went to the most direct place I could communicate with her and raised it.

Overall, I could have made the comment more digestible and friendly. Speaking of beginners mind, even if you evaluate the situation from the opposite view of mine

"Left a rude comment on the post about attribution"

I'm still only guilty of rudely commenting in the effort to defend someone else's work whom I don't really know. It's also a bit hard for me, because I received a similar comment just 1 week ago and handled it quite differently.

Overall, you gave me a lot to think about. Thanks for giving me an opportunity to improve!



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ssimontis profile image
Scott Simontis

No problem! Whenever I see the comments get a little uncomfortable, I try to step in because I'm one of our content moderators. My hope is that by reconstructing the events as a third party it can be turned into a learning experience for everyone who reads that far into the comments.

And at the end of the day, we're all adults and we should feel free to act like responsible adults. You're going to offend people for reasons beyond your understanding, there's always that person looking for any excuse to start a fight, and my generation is really guilty of "I believe in freedom of speech unless it goes against my beliefs."

Glad you got something constructive out of it!

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Tinus Smit

Awesome stuff :-D

I especially like "51. Kill your darlings". Too many developers have an unhealthy emotional attachment to their code, to the point where simple suggestions / questions are taken as attacks on the code. The code I wrote yesterday / last month / beginning of my career may be subject to improvement. Therefore I welcome discussions about my code and ways to improve. Sometimes I learn a new thing, and sometimes I teach a new thing with these sorts of discussions :-D

One important thing I also learned is to spot tunnel vision when it happens.

Whenever I'm trying to write some complicated clever code to solve a very specific problem, I take a step back and look at the big picture. Often times I'll see that what I was trying to do in one place was more efficiently done elsewhere, and my problem finds its resolution.

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TorIamOne

Can I suggest something that might help your ashtma? I used to have ashtma up until I was 15 y/o. I understand how difficult it is.

After my last ashtma episode at age 15, I continue to suffer of terrible allergies up until a year ago. I would sneeze every morning as if I had a cold. Doctors had said that I was going to have this type of allergy until I die. I believed this bec. I, like most people, believe our doctors. One day I said to myself I would try to find a cure for this horrible 'morning allergy' as they called it.

I tried eliminating certain foods and writing down what I eliminated. The next day I would try something different. Finally after about 2 years of testing I realized that I was allergic to night shade vegetables. I have to mention that I also eliminated bread, cereals, pasta etc.

I don't have allergies anymore!!! I don't sneeze every morning. I feel fantastic! I also don't feel short of breath as I did once in a while before. I share this bec. it might help u. Ashtma is no fun.
What do I eat? I eat a mostly carnivore diet, 1 or 2 raw carrots(necessary to stay regular), cheese( I love cheese). I give myself a treat 2 or 3 pieces of chocolate about 60gr per day. I have personally discovered that vegetables might not be all good for all humans. Certainly tomatoes, zuccini, pickles are not my friends. If you want, give it a try you might find that u no longer have ashtma.

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dougaws profile image
Doug

Listen more than you talk
Learn by teaching
Don't be afraid to ask the dumb question
For every criticism, 10 compliments
Before you send that angry email/text, let it sit for 10 minutes
Revise, revise, revise

Great list Emma, I'm going to look at it regularly as a reminder

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JackPWriter

Thanks a lot for providing here tips for being a great programmer which are very beneficial for IT learners of Quality Dissertation where they are come to take coursework help UK with pass guarantee.

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webconsultantkr profile image
Web Consultant

This article is so good that I translated it in Korean and shared it. Related Links: medium.com/jaewoo/%ED%9B%8C%EB%A5%...

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Juneau Lim

About 10% way down, I thought "I have to make a roadmap kanban board with this." Then It took a while to realize, this list is quite beefy for that.
Thank you for amazing advice. You have to write a book about it later.

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javinpaul • Edited

How do you write such no-nonsense, great posts? If I can replace all these 101 with one tip- I would say, just #CodeEveryDay and you will become the great programmer.

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biffbaff64 profile image
Richard Ikin

Point 1 is 100% spot on. I've mentioned this before to people, and some have, astonishingly, disagreed. You don't need to have everything in your head to be a good developer, but you do need to know how to research.

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figspville profile image
Salli Figler

What a fantastic list of tangible and actionable items. This should be kept handy and Re-read often, especially when feeling uncertain or just blue. Thank you for putting such thought into this and for sharing.

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Chiamaka Ikeanyi

Great tips Emma.

I would add that:

When you finally solve a problem that you searched for online and couldn't find a solution, be kind to go back to that thread and provide the solution.

Doing so helps the next person that may find him/herself in the same position.

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cescquintero profile image
Francisco Quintero 🇨🇴

Wow, it was actually a hundred and one tips.

🤯👏🏽

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malagutti profile image
Anderson

Great list Emma. Thanks for sharing! :)

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alexiu5s profile image
Alexius • Edited

Emma! I loved your article,this have to be share with my coworkers ;)

dougaws profile image
Doug

Get a dog. I walk mine three times a day:
8am 45 minutes
3pm 20 minutes
8pm 10 minutes

Lost 5 pounds in 2 months!

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the_von_truber profile image
Kwame

This...💯💯💯

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johnangel profile image
John Angel • Edited

Great article Emma, thanks for sharing this!

The most important one IMHO "The only thing you should compare yourself to is who you were yesterday"

And I would add, "Remember that this is about human beings working for and with human beings. No need to act like you´re not from this planet..."

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David J Eddy

I LOVE your article Emma! Very well done. The whole list is great.

Some thoughts I had while reading:

"...7. Name variables and functions appropriately..."
There are two real problems in computing:
Naming things
Cache invalidation
Off by one errors

"...17. Don't gate keep..."
IMO, programming has room for everyone. From toddler to retired.

"...51. Kill your darlings..."
I tell anyone I can '...when the code leaves your machine, it is not longer your code. Let it go."

"...64. Learn design patterns..."
Of everything I know today, I wish I knew this sooner.

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foresthoffman profile image
Forest Hoffman

37. Learn to learn

People learn in different ways. Some learn best through video tutorials, others through reading a book. Figure out your learning style and practice it diligently.

And

50. Don't try to learn everything

There is an infinity pool of knowledge in the world and it is simply impossible to conquer it all. Pick several topics to master and leave the rest be. You can acquire working or tangential knowledge about other areas, but you cannot possibly master everything.

These go hand in hand. There's this dangerous myth about the "rockstar" developer, who knows everything off the top of their head. It's absolutely bunk. The folks that appear to be "rockstar" developers have simply learned how to learn. They know where to find a solution if they don't already know it!

If only I could go back in time and give my CS students this list!

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dploeger profile image
Dennis Ploeger

Great article!

I'd like to add to #72:

Write documentation

Yes, it's a thing most developers neglect, but good documentation (be it API documentation, well documented code or prose about a project) helps yourself to grasp and reflect on what your code is all about; helps others understanding it; helps your three years older self understanding it when revisiting it. Also, learn how to write good, comprehensive, well structured and readable documentation.

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wangzy2019 profile image
wangzy

Hi, Your article is very instructive,Could I translate it into Chinese?

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emmabostian profile image
Emma Bostian ✨ Author

That would be great, thanks! Just please link back to the original article!

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wangzy2019 profile image
wangzy

No problem,I will do that and let you know then.

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wangzy2019 profile image
wangzy

I have finished,This is the link.
juejin.im/post/5d2d8d3ff265da1b846...

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bellnorm profile image
Norm • Edited

Tip no. 46, Review your own code, is very important. It's easy to think all is well, since you wrote the code yourself, but it can be amazing what you discover about your own code when you review it yourself before submitting it for a code review. I created my own checklist to use when reviewing my own code and it was very helpful. The checklist includes things like, 1) Do the parameters of this method have appropriate guard clauses?, 2) Is this method too long?, 3) Are the names of my properties, methods, variables sufficiently clear?, etc.

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Kyle Pollich

Thanks, Emma! Great post and I absolutely love the illustrations.

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Emma Bostian ✨ Author

Thanks they're from UnDraw!

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syntopikyle profile image
Kyle Walsh

Nodding in approval to all of it, really impressive list. Thanks for compiling it! Appreciate the effort :)

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motss profile image
Rong Sen Ng

Skills fade with time unless consciously improved upon, and this industry evolves so rapidly it's important to keep practicing.

Love this the most.

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ben profile image
Ben Halpern

Amazing

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John Luke Garofalo

Amazing article. All very important points that people don't talk about enough. Thank you for writing this, Emma.

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nirmal_kumar profile image
Nirmal

Excellent Gems of Wisdom - Feels like 20+ years of experience capsuled in 101 points.

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Neil Buchanan

Well done!, inspirational.

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rachelsoderberg profile image
Rachel Soderberg

Surfing? Horseback riding? Rollerblading?

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colinlord profile image
Colin Lord

Thank you for writing this, Emma! So many good points in here, some of which I'd accidentally let slip to the back of my mind.

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Page Carbajal • Edited

Awesome article. Thanks for sharing.

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Shreyas Minocha

This is such a great list. Thanks Emma!

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Dan Conn

A superb list. Thanks for sharing. Loving the Ladybug Podcast too!

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bradtaniguchi profile image
Brad

Each of these topics could be its own article, and I'd heart each one!

To bad there is no way to give 101 hearts to just this one haha!

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josephadah profile image
Joseph Adah

Thank you Emma.
I want to apply for job I'm not yet qualified for 👩‍💻

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ankitdobhal profile image
Ankit Dobhal

One of the best blog
I like it

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keevcodes profile image
Andrew McKeever

wonderful list!

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johnemms profile image
john-emms

What a comprehensive list, you almost missed nothing.

Thanks.

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qcgm1978 profile image
Youth

I agree with you 90% of the opinions. The remaining 10% I respect.

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Rachel Costello

This is great, thanks Emma! 🙌 Really interesting reading for someone like myself who's interested in learning more about how engineers work and what their main goals are

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efrapp profile image
Efrain Pinto Ponce • Edited

This post is as beautiful as youR work! Thank you so much for share it! :)

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emmabostian profile image
Emma Bostian ✨ Author

Hi, I appreciate the compliment but this is a professional blog and I would prefer to keep the comments professional. Thanks.

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efrapp profile image
Efrain Pinto Ponce

Ok fixed! Have a great day.

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Jason Belcher

Really enjoyed the article. I read the whole thing which is to say it is well written and useful advice.

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Iago Mendes

What an amazing list! Thanks for sharing. <3

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nandhithakamal

This is a great list!
No nonsense and to the point!
Thanks for making this! 🤓

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Yuesang Lee

Hi, i got impressed with your valuable post.
May i translate this to other language and share?

Thanks for your post. Have a nice day!

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emmabostian profile image
Emma Bostian ✨ Author

Of course! :) Thanks!

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itscoderslife profile image
Coder

Exhaustive :) but every point is valid one.

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aaronnunez95 profile image
Aaron Nuñez

Great Article! These tips are a knowledge compendium.

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a7med__1996 profile image
Ahmed Abdel Fattah

Thank you, Emma Wedekind.
you are great.

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Gautam Thapa

Excellent tips for Every programmers.

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outcastqwerty profile image
//Reza

turns out I have to work a lot as a beginner hehe
I'm gonna enjoy every moment of it, and thanks for these awesome tips

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FuadAhmad82

Great Article thank you so much :)

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agrutter87 profile image
agrutter87

Great article! Shared it around the office to my fellow Juniors

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Yogeswaran

Hey there! I shared your article here t.me/theprogrammersclub and check out the group if you haven't already!

yaser profile image
Yaser Al-Najjar

What kind of sports you find thrilling deep inside your heart?

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tvanantwerp profile image
Tom VanAntwerp
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nux99 profile image
Nuga

Nice!

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Nabil Tharwat

Hey, may I translate your article into Arabic? I'll link back to this page at the top of the translated article. Would really appreciate it ^

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amir profile image
Jack @code 👨‍💻