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I am working daily on the following systems:

  • Linux (Arch/i3, Arch/Gnome, Fedora/Gnome)
  • Windows 10 pro
  • MacOS 10.14

Here's my opinion on them.

Linux is my favourite by far, due to its simplicity, openness, and ability to "just work".

A few years ago, I found Windows to be pretty awful to work with, especially regarding accessibility and configuration, but windows 10 somehow managed to get seriously better, and I now use it daily to work with the same comfort level as linux.

On the other side, from day one, macos has been one of the worst experiences I could meet, and it still continues to drive me crazy every day.

The worst issue I have with MacOS is the software management.
As long as you pass through their awful app store, everything somehow seems okayish (the ish being for this garbage called XCode), but once you need a software like Apache, Ruby, or pretty much anything command-line, you have two choices: Either you compile it yourself (which is now my default choice after fighting with the other solution), or you use one of the crappy hacky scripts like Brew, which will just fuck up your environment beyond repair.

There's no clear process management (launchd is a joke, you can't even pull logs without some obscure black magic you need to know by heart), no standard configuration path, the OS is bundling a lot of crap it needs, putting it in a fucking global path.

The UI doesn't let you use tabs to select fields (you can only focus text fields by pressing tab. No button, no dropdown, almost no link), the constant focus shift by spawned processes is a real flow-breaker, the shadow updates (Microsoft, is that you?) are destroying your life.

The sound and network systems give you no control, especially on disabling or enabling interfaces, and the sound system simply cannot manage multiple interfaces. What the hell?

Switching between fullscreen and desktop-contained window positioning does some weird glitches on half the softwares you use, and you're forced to install half the github-hosted projects to be able to move windows with your keyboard.

The finder is a nightmare to organize, especially when you want to check hidden files or just "go higher" (hidden interactions EVERYWHERE), and there are so many different ways to open a file that you just hope it'll work the first time.


So, uh, yeah. Linux and Windows

 

My Mac-loving co-workers often ask me "why do you use a Windows laptop instead of a Macbook?" For me, I found that, much like Diane:

macos has been one of the worst experiences I could meet, and it still continues to drive me crazy every day.

More: the last time I had to carry an Apple laptop, it was both more fragile than my HP and Dell laptops and, when it broke, was a lot more of a righteous pain in the ass to get serviced. Seriously: when I'm spending that kind of money for a computer and, especially, a service-contract, your repair-monkey ought to be coming to me, not forcing me to come to some mall to talk to a "genius".

A few years ago, I found Windows to be pretty awful to work with, especially regarding accessibility and configuration

On the plus side, things like Cygwin/X was good for making Windows an easy way to interact with remote UNIX and Linux hosts. And, if I wasn't having to do any low-level tasks in my code, I could even do shit locally/offline, and it would work when I pushed it to my development-targets.

but windows 10 somehow managed to get seriously better, and I now use it daily to work with the same comfort level as linux.

The Metro interface is still godawful, but a bit less aggressively so than it was in Windows 8. So, there's that. But, yeah, the other, less Windowsy bits make it require a lot less in the way of "taming" just to get work done (and, unlike OSX, you can tame it).

 

I think you didn't finish this sentence. Did you?

I think my browser monched something. I had had a complete thought in there, though I can't remember specifically what (so, nuked the stub).

Greh.

 

In recent years I have worked with Linux as my base system (Ubuntu) for me it is excellent for programming purposes but in my country (Dominican Republic) Windows still predominates in companies and I have always had to adapt.

This year I have been using windows 10, I have noticed a great advance in the work environment but I feel that it can still improve more and I do not change Linux because I am still feeling much more productive in Ubuntu.

I agree with you regarding Linux and Windows Pro.

 

Overall, I feel like Microsoft and Apple are switching places.

The greedy company building weirdly working softwares and pushing annoying politics swapped places with the company with which "everything just works".

Overall, I feel like Microsoft and Apple are switching places.

The greedy company building weirdly working softwares and pushing annoying politics swapped places with the company with which "everything just works".

It's the whole Apple philosophy of "we know better than you how our hardware should be used" thing that grates me. I shouldn't feel like I'm being force to fight a damned tool - especially, I shouldn't have to be bridling against artificial constraints. Even at its worst, Windows had plenty of "escape hatches" to get around its more-annoying bits.

 

i am using linux for about 2 years and tried Linux mint,Manjaro,Kali linux untill I met Ubuntu.Since then I am using ubuntu as it is simple,fast and easy to use and suitable for my work of Web developement.
Besides it I rarely use windows 10 (don't like it so much due to its sluggishness.)

 

I use Manjaro Arch Linux... compared to the other Linux distributions I've tried this woks the best. Now when I want to connect to a printer (for instance) and use the scanner I use Ubuntu. Ubuntu in my humble opinion is better at talking to Windows oriented devices.

 

What you're basically asking is "what's your favorite hammer for driving a nail." The important bit isn't so much the hammer as how well the particular nail was driven by it.

So, my answer would have to be, "the OS that allows me to accomplish my task with the least amount of effort spent fighting against limitations of the OS (or my familiarity with it)".

 
 
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Diogenes Polanco profile image
I’m a developer. I am very excited about the development communities, entrepreneurship and especially open source.