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Bellatrix
Bellatrix

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Engineering freshman starter pack

Missing the boat = lack of awareness

Regrets are unforgettable. I am listing a few of my regrets and good habits from the time I was a college freshman, and these regrets can help you a lot, even if you are a sophomore.

1 Failure to conduct research

When I left the school, I was like a free bird. I started learning Javascript, without revising HTML and CSS. All I wanted was to learn web development, but I never cared to do a bit of research on where to start and how to start.

2 There is a lack of clarity regarding multiple domains.

Computer science is just a word, but there are many, many domains. If I count a few, Web development, Machine learning, ethical hacking, Cloud computing, Database management, Blockchain development, and many more. Before starting with one of these or any domain, do careful research and learn about as many domains as you can. It helps you find your interests.

3 Maintain your interest

I started engaging myself with content writing after I completed school. If you are not very knowledgeable about technical things, you can do whatever you like, but stay engaged.

4 Never let social media control you.

When we get free time, we use social media a lot. I would advise you to spend time reading books (any genre), watching good web series or movies, and using Linkedin.

5 Interact with people who are not on your campus.

Competing only on your campus can get you the highest package or best company that visits your campus. But knowing what others your age are doing is equally important. Your competition should be with everyone who is in the same race as you. LinkedIn plays a huge role in this.

6 Don't get bogged down by certifications, courses, or unrelated internships.

I was attracted towards certifications and irrelevant courses, which were as boring as anything. And I wasted time on these things. Also, doing internships in digital marketing, social media marketing, and content writing will not get you anywhere.

7 Campus ambassador programmes and social media marketing

Never apply for such programs. I have experienced this. These are damn useless. Even adding such experience to your resume is not advised. 

Naming a few, Internshala student partner, IMUN campus ambassador, and oneplus student ambassador will make you do marketing only. And marketing is not for engineers.

Postman student expert and GitHub campus expert are two excellent programs.

8 Useful things to Spend Your Time

I learned French before I got the burden of my subjects in first year. One can learn anything, be it painting, music, or whatever they like. But learning a programming language is always preferred over other things. I already had a background in programming before college, so I learned French.

9 Don't miss a single opportunity.

If you do not use LinkedIn, you are going to miss hundreds of opportunities every month.

10 Find a good senior who can give you sound advice.

While most of your seniors may seem careless, you should find the right person to get advice from.

11 Become a member of clubs and societies

Joining clubs and societies will not always provide a significant advantage in terms of placement.But being a member of clubs like GDG, MLSA, and mentorship programmes can help you learn new things.

12 Memberships

Women who code, GDSC, Girls Who Code, and Girlsup are a few groups I know of which you can become a member. These groups have a nice tutorial collection, scholarship opportunities, and hackathon tickets for you.

13 Start with a robust programming language.

When you start to learn how to code, it's good to start with C++. Although Java, JS, and Python are also cool. But Java and JS seem tough to many, Python is too easy to learn and can make it hard for you to learn Java or C++ later. C#, Go, Kotlin, and other programming languages are also useful, but C++ teaches you from the ground up.

14 Create projects

Keep making projects from what you learn.

15 Don't ignore your college subjects for programming

CGPA matters a lot.

Some useful links ​

  1. Projects

  2. Last-minute notes.

Discussion (1)

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Unknown Person • Edited on

I like your title freshman starter pack and your content most useful
i think CGPA doesn't matters its ok 6 to 7.5 cgpa for placement
skills most important for placement

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