re: To Bootcamp or Not To Bootcamp VIEW POST

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I have what Americans will consider a B.Eng in Information Technology (had too look it up, your education system is so different) which usually takes 5 years to complete (some people take less) and has 50/51 courses (42 mandatory, and 8 or 9 optionals, in my case all where e-goverment related). I also semi-completed a Masters in Free Software Technologies (didn't complete my thesis) back when the whole Free Software was a total thing, I also completed several post grad courses.

But...back in those days I worked in academia, and people in academia believe that taking classes is the solution for everything. In hindsight I've learned more from involving in Free Software and Open Source projects than in a classroom. Of course, they're are different kinds of knowledge, but all of them have their place in the "tech space".

A friend of mine use to compare this to building a cathedral:

  1. There's an architect that knows all the science.

  2. There's a construction engineer that knows all about the process.

  3. There's a builder that knows how to work the tools (actually there are several builders and each has unique knowledge).

Each of them has value and sometimes a good builder can fix a great design and an architect knows how to handle a shovel.

So TL;DR (cause it's late and I'm rambling) bootcamps are a good option, but self learning needs to be your mantra here because nobody can teach you experience.

 

Very well put Yoandy. As I was telling Donald below, it sounds like no matter what there will always be self teaching. Which I know is to be expected. But you're right - nobody can teach me my experience. They can only teach/help from their own experience. I'm eager to grab more experience but it seems like there is so much ahead of me, I just want to make sure I'm making a good choice.

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