DEV Community

Cover image for Which one has a better future? blockchain or full stack developer.
Ali Navidi
Ali Navidi

Posted on

Which one has a better future? blockchain or full stack developer.

Hi, as a beginner of the community I see a lot of people talking that web3.0 is the future of the developing.

How do you predict the future?

as a front-end developer and someone new to the community I like to stay updated and choose the path that has future ahead (either financially or regarding job opportunities), so here is my question should I switch to blockchain developing? like solidity or should I just don't rush to it and continue the web developing path ( web2.0 i think:) ).

Again thank you for your kind replies and helps.

Discussion (18)

Collapse
jonrandy profile image
Jon Randy

Blockchain (in most cases) is still a solution looking for a problem. On the other hand, the skills in full-stack will be applicable to many, wide-ranging problems. For stability, that would be the way to go, but by all means - dabble in other stuff if it interests you!

Collapse
rubyrubenstahl profile image
Ruby Rubenstahl • Edited on

This.

Block chain is an interesting technology, and I think there is likely to be some use case that it's perfect for, but every time I've actually looked at a use-case that it's been implemented in thus far I haven't been able to figure out how the blockchain element is actually providing anything that traditional methods couldn't, or really anywhere that it's providing any value.

The other day I came across a post on reddit about somewhere (want to say france) using blockchain with identifiers marked on cartons to prove the provenance of eggs. Who knows how much money was spent on developing the whole system when all it can do is cryptigraphically verify that yes, indeed, that box has a valid QR code, ignoring the fact that you can't cryptographically verify an egg. As far as I could tell the system had exactly the same functionality as if you assigned each carton a GUID.

Of course, crypto currency comes to mind, but the privacy implications and scalability issues that come along with it make it more of a liability to sustained growth in my view.

I don't think that blockchain isn't worth learning at all, especially if you're interested, but if you're trying to brush up your professional skills and looking for way to increase your marketability, blockchain is just about the last place you want to be unless your goal is to work at a tech-bro startup that is going to be bankrupt in a year.

Someone will make something useful with blockchain at some point and it may become a valuable skill, but at the moment it's a skill that is going to give you more street cred than actually advancing your career.

Collapse
westernal profile image
Ali Navidi Author

Thank you very muchπŸ™πŸ»πŸ™πŸ»πŸ™πŸ»

Collapse
westernal profile image
Ali Navidi Author

Thank you very muchπŸ™πŸ»πŸ™πŸ»πŸ™πŸ»

Collapse
diegochavez profile image
Diego Chavez

Hey Ali!

Always try take a test ride before buying!

I'm Web 2 developer for 13+ years already, worked with Mobile development, Android, Swift, React Native, Unity, and learning Web 3 just for fun no presure :)

I can see that blockchain is here to stay IMHO and there's potential, my advice is establish fundamentals as software engineer and delivering enterprise grade solutions as standard, CI/CD, develiery methods, quality and code organization, this still not changing for the moment and is really needed, engineering is about building useful solutions with code, techniques to achieve solutions can change a bit but you will experience the same problems, PUB/SUB, event driven, CRUD, sockets, REST, GraphQL, reading and writing data that's all about most of the time :)

The traditional Web2 can offer you experienced mentors and all this knowledge is transferable to Web3 in some degree, speaking of browser based solutions,

One reality of the Web 3 path is still a work in progress and there's a lot of friction and frustration regarding documentation and knowledge transfer, but challenging oportunities can generate great rewards, one week your code works next week third party updates will break it.

I still remember when the industry didn't saw a lot of future in Frontend Tech, HTML5, with Video, Canvas, took over Flash, Silverlight, so my advice is to be curious, step back reflect, see yourself working with that tech for a couple of years? but most important enjoy what you do, stay curious!

Best regards,

Collapse
westernal profile image
Ali Navidi Author

Wow, thank you very very much πŸ™πŸ»πŸ™πŸ»πŸ™πŸ»

Collapse
cupofjoakim profile image
Joakim Wimmerstedt

I'd argue that they're both solid options, but blockchain is definitely more risky. It's not exactly a given future that we're always going to do blockchain and with the risk of getting targeted by the fury of the web3 evangelists - so far it's not giving any measurable benefit to end users which will always be a big block for it to take of.

The reason that we hear a lot about web3 at this point is simply because a lot of engineers and crypto enthusiasts want it to happen. This doesn't mean that it will happen however.

If it were to happen I promise you that the transition path from fullstack to blockchain will not be as big as you might think, especially if you're thinking in terms of web2. vs web3.

On the question of "How do you predict the future" I can give this advice: If there's a lot of people being very vocal, remember that we only ever hear the ones who are super excited. It's like online reviews - you have to feel strongly for something to actually post it. No one is going to post a 3/5 "it's ok" on a product. Take everything you hear with a grain of salt and try to look at what the silent majority is doing instead.

Collapse
westernal profile image
Ali Navidi Author

Thank you very much. Very helpful comment, i was just confused but your comment gave me a lot of hope, again thank youπŸ™πŸ»πŸ™πŸ»

Collapse
olyno profile image
Olyno • Edited on

I'm going to write this post trying to answer the majority's question here: "Web 3.0 is a solution looking for a problem"

If web 3.0, and cypto in general was created, it is because therefore there are problems. Here are some real life examples of why we need web 3.0:

No retirement

In many countries, no pension is available. In France for example, we have access to a pension offered by our government, but the age to get it is only getting older, and therefore it is very likely that our generation (1990 - 2005) will not have access to it.

Thanks to web 3.0 and more particularly to the different farms or staking, I see here a long term solution to get a deserved retirement.

I would add to that the problem of the different savings which are 2% maxiumum, against 5 - 10% in crypto.

Lack of confidence

As we know, humans can be corrupt. Whether it's with elections, tracking information or any other form that needs a human, everything can be corrupted.

Thanks to web 3.0, you don't trust anyone, only the network (which is trusted) will be there for you. I prefer to vote via blockchain for our next president than to go to the polls so that in the end the result may be rigged.

New economy

As an open source developer in my spare time, I don't get anything on my creations, even if they are used by hundreds or thousands of people. In total, I had to earn 3$ (without taxes, otherwise 1.5$). This debate comes up often, but many independent creators can't live from their passions.

Thanks to web 3.0, blockchains allow to create a new economy used exponentially and becoming mainstream as the years go by. Whether it's via the retirement that I mentioned above, or with the play to earn games, or the fundraising that is done online in 5 minutes, the remuneration of independent artists via NFTs for example, and so on.

Open source

In today's web, we don't know what companies do with our data, the bugs that can be present....

Thanks to web 3.0, and the fact that everything is open source (yes, even the contracts you interact with) allows us to have total control over what happens.

I could go on in many other categories in which blockchain would be the solution to a problem, such as insurance, or personal data sharing, but I think I have said the most important points in my opinion.

Small call to action from me, don't hesitate to have a look in my post about web 3.0 and if this technology is ready to use or not: dev.to/olyno/web-30-not-ready-yet-...

Collapse
westernal profile image
Ali Navidi Author

Wow, thank you very muchπŸ™πŸ»πŸ™πŸ»

Collapse
kayis profile image
K (he/him)

At least the frontend part is identical, so if you start from there you don't have any risk.

Learn JS/TS, HTML/CSS and you're good to go.

Do a few Web2 and Web3 projects, and see what works.

Collapse
westernal profile image
Ali Navidi Author

Thank you very muchπŸ™πŸ»

Collapse
darkwiiplayer profile image
π’Š©Wii πŸ’–πŸ’›πŸ’šπŸ’™πŸ’œπŸ’πŸ’Ÿ

Web 2.0 still has a future. Maybe it will be replaced by Web 4.0 some day, but without having the slightest idea what that would even look like, it seems safe to assume 2.0 will be with us for quite a while longer.

Web 3.0 really is just a solution looking for a problem. I haven't yet heard of a single thing that can actually be solved best by persistent, public and prohibitively expensive database, and couldn't be solved much more easily with other technologies (very often just public-key-cryptography).

Collapse
westernal profile image
Ali Navidi Author

Thank you very muchπŸ™πŸ»πŸ™πŸ»

Collapse
jeremyf profile image
Jeremy Friesen

Do you like to buy lottery tickets? Getting good at blockchain is spending a lot of time and energy getting good at buying lottery tickets.

pluralistic.net/2022/03/28/dumb-mo...

Collapse
westernal profile image
Ali Navidi Author

Great example, thanksπŸ™πŸ»

Collapse
britzdylan profile image
Dylan Britz

Web3 is not the next step like most people think. It's a sidestep to web2/ a additional solution to very specific problems (we don't even know yet)

Collapse
westernal profile image
Ali Navidi Author

ThanksπŸ™πŸ»