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Ali Navidi
Ali Navidi

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What was your mistakes in your career path?

Mistakes help us grow, What was your one mistake that you want others not to do that?

Discussion (56)

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Keith Lee

Being reluctant to change jobs

When I realized that I was coding myself into a corner where I knew that:

  • No-one would maintain my code after I left and the project would slowly self-deprecate
  • I was going to be stuck on the same project for the duration of my tenure regardless of my skills, and have limited upward mobility

I should have developed my exit strategy immediately.

Be realistic about your prospects and your self-worth. Don't trap yourself because you still really like your job.

Keeping my creativity to myself

I often find myself coming up with great ideas from which my company could really benefit or I will have an epiphany about how to drastically improve one of my projects. Sometimes I've kept these to myself in case I can turn them into something on my own time, or I'll do little more than mention them in passing to my supervisor.

A better approach would be to write something up. Flesh out the details, do a cost/benefit analysis, approximate number of person-hours required, and so on. If you don't champion your ideas to the right people, they'll never see the light of day.

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Ali Navidi Author

thanks a lot for sharing!

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Chris Gustin

Thinking that a handful of free tutorials and short courses would be enough to learn web dev. When I finally started investing time and money into in-depth courses with experienced teachers and planned curriculums, I learned way more, way faster, and retained it a lot better.

In that same vein, I wish I had picked up some certifications earlier on than I did. Once I did that and added them to my LinkedIn profile, I started getting good quality inquiries from agencies/recruiters/employers.

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Yannis Folias

have you got some examples of more in-depth courses?

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Chris Gustin

Your mileage may vary, but some paid books/courses/platforms I found helpful in my career path, in the order I did them:

  • A Better Way to Learn... (series of books, I went through the HTML/CSS/JS/jQuery ones and highly recommend)
  • Javascript: Novice to Ninja (book, highly recommend although may be a tiny bit dated)
  • Various Wordpress books and a PHP/MySQL book that I can't remember the name of now. If you're going into Wordpress dev I highly recommend going through an intensive PHP-specific course of some kind, as opposed to just grinding out Wordpress courses and fumbling through the PHP. Makes things way easier
  • Frontend Masters (online platform, very helpful for learning intermediate to advanced JS)
  • Academind Vue.js courses on Udemy (I think I did the Complete Intro and their Nuxt.js course too. very easy way to learn Vue, highly recommend any course Academind makes)
  • Packt (online platform with access to technical books. very hit or miss but I did find a few gems in there)
  • CS50 (free course through EdX, I opted to pay for the verified cert. highly recommend if you're serious about a career in IT. it's like learning music theory after being a self-taught musician: you can get by fine without, but knowing it will open even more doors)
  • CS50W (this is the web programming specific follow-up to CS50, i'm about halfway through and took a pause to focus on some career changes that came up, to beef up my JS chops, and to learn React. it's very Python/Django-heavy, but the overall concepts are valuable if you're a web dev and want to be full-stack)
  • Scrimba.com (i'm going through their Frontend Dev Roadmap course and can't recommend it enough. one of the pricier platforms i've used, but also one of the easiest, best designed, thorough, and up to date. have skilled up quickly on Flexbox/Grid, modern JS, and currently working through their React modules. i feel like i've leveled up the most going through their material, although i'll probably look for something else once i finish the React modules)

Hope that helps!

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yfolias profile image
Yannis Folias

many thanks for your reply. my path does indeed vary but in any case these are extremely valuable resources

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Ali Navidi Author

thanks a lot for sharing!

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Ali Navidi Author • Edited on

Starting with me: I trusted my employer on my first job and gave him my code without a contract so he didn't gave me any money so, DO NOT GIVE YOUR CODE TO ANYONE WITHOUT A CONTRACT

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Chris Gustin

Adding to this, I found out late in my freelance career that a contract can be as simple as an email laying out “I’m going to do {scope of work} for {payment details} within {timeline}” and having the other person reply that they agree.

Obligatory: I’m not a lawyer, check your local laws, this worked for me but it may not apply to every situation.

Just putting it out there in case anyone feels daunted about trying to draft up contracts (make sure you have something in writing before you start working on stuff).

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Ali Navidi Author

Thank you very much🙏🏻

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Tawhid

I also fall into a similar trap and it was something I learnt the hard way

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Ali Navidi Author

me too :(

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Atul Prajapati

I first mistake is very common which most of developers always do which is

"blindly get attrackted to shiny objects like new code editor, new programming language, new course, etc"

blind man

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Muhammad Mutahhar

New Courses ✋

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Ali Navidi Author

thanks a lot for sharing

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Jesus Guerrero
  • Take people words without contract.
  • Let vacations for later because my project "needed" me.
  • Believe in "talk is cheap show me the code" managers seems to value more people who talk more and don't code.
  • Practice algorithms and take interviews even when you're not looking for a Job maybe we don't agree that we need to take live coding challenges and algorithms to prove our value but those are the rules of the game and we have to be prepared.
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Ali Navidi Author

Thank you very much 🙏🏻

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Ben Halpern

Probably anything that involved trying to go it alone in different contexts if there was help that was available.

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Ali Navidi Author

thanks a lot for sharing!

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Randall • Edited on

I would say the biggest mistake I've made was when I started getting into freelancing, I started out by just going to the biggest freelancing platforms and placing bids there. Got very little good work from those places, and wasted quite a lot of time there. Eventually I joined a more exclusive contracting agency and got good work relatively easily through that.

Besides that, there are some things I wonder about sometimes, but it's unclear if they were mistakes.

After I graduated from university, I had an offer from Amazon. I turned it down because I had heard a lot of bad things about working there, and I took a lower paying offer from a lesser known company with a great work culture instead. Now I tend to think I would be better off if I had gone to Amazon, stayed for a year or something, got Amazon on my resume, and got my career off to a faster start that way. But I don't know, maybe I made the right choice after all.

Another thing was when I quit my programming job and moved to Japan to teach English. That didn't work out so well and I didn't stay there for very long. But that began a two year journey of digital nomadding and freelancing. It probably slowed me down career-wise, but it was also a great experience over all. Mistake? Perhaps, but I tend to think not.

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Ali Navidi Author

Don't regret the past, thanks for sharing and good luck🙏🏻

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Brad
  1. Not caring enough in high school
  2. Not caring enough in college until I got a big fat F for a class (then I kicked it into gear)
  3. Maybe sticking around longer than I should have at specific companies that were not going to go anywhere.

I'd also like to point out, none of these mistakes are regrets. Each was a learning experience.

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Ali Navidi Author

thank you very much for sharing!

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Nathan Stevenson

Not collaborating with others on projects, opting to fly solo most times.

I only have the one internship under my belt, about 9 months. I do not work in development presently, but I work on various personal projects on my free time. So take this for what it's worth.

I've come to realize that having just one other person to collaborate with is a game changer. Talking through problems, developing a path forward, bouncing ideas of each other as we work towards a solution, and a greater drive to put in effort as to not disappoint our peers. We also bring something different to the table, which help fill in knowledge gaps.

Collaborating with others can also help with networking and employment later on. All it takes is for one of the people you've worked on a project with to suggest you as a candidate for an open position and you now have your foot in the door.

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Ali Navidi Author

Thanks for sharing!!!

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nstvnsn profile image
Nathan Stevenson

No problem! If I can help someone learn from my mistake, it wasn't a mistake.

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leob

Not going freelance sooner ... my last "boring office job" was really a low, and a waste of time - it totally didn't live up to the expectations that I'd had, it was a dud on so many levels ... but, it really convinced me to change course and go freelance, and do things completely different :)

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Ali Navidi Author

thanks a lot for sharing!

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Chantae P.

For my, it's not taking coding seriously from day one. I was fired from my retail job in 2019. Since then I've started my coding journey. Unfortunately in the beginning, I made the mistake of jumping from language to language hoping to find a language that's "easier" to learn. I've also wasted time in "tutorial hell". I'd basically just follow along with the instructor instead of trying things out for myself and doing my research. And of course not building projects outside of the course. Huge mistake right there.

Fast forward to now, although my skills aren't perfect, I'm finally getting better at HTML and CSS by building real projects. I do rely on tutorials but not as much as before. I'm also joining meetups and networking from time to time.

Sometimes I beat myself up for wasting so much time because if I was doing what I'm doing now, back when I started my coding journey, I would have had a job by now.

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Ali Navidi Author

Thanks a lot for sharing🙏🏻

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Maddy

Not leaving my first employer sooner.

I joined a consultancy firm and stayed there for just under 2 years and left on the bench for the majority of the time (plus, the pandemic in between).

Biggest mistake made so far.

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Ali Navidi Author

Thanks for sharing🙏🏻

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Jan Küster

Not starting a side business early on.

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Ali Navidi Author

Thanks a lot for sharing🙏🏻

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Aman Vishwakarma

I made the wrong career choice in my life, after clearing high school, I thought that I could become CA and enrolled myself but after some time I feel that this is the worst decision I ever made. I don't know how to tell my family about this that I wanted to become a programmer, but I can't tell to my family. I belong to poor family background, and they already spent 22000 INR rupees on me, but I feel myself to be a burden to them. And because of that, I am suffering from a lot of mental pressure. Ever since I found that I wanted to become a programmer, every single day I feel regret enrolling myself in the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India. I don't know how to handle this.
So, please when you are deciding about your career path please consider all the sorts of things, because one single mistake in life makes you feel regret and you can't do anything about it.

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Ali Navidi Author

Wow, good luck and thanks for sharing!

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Leonardo Dias

Spending too much time in a company and having faith in their promises . Could have quit earlier but I was afraid that I might not be “good enough “ for the market. So I ended up believing in their promises that I would get a better salary and a promotion in X months/years.

My advice is: if you’re not satisfied with your current job ,project or compensation and the managers keep making promises of a better future instead of solving the issue right now, just quit. It will be scary if you have been there for a long time, but once you do it you will feel a lot better.

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Ali Navidi Author

I had the exact same situation, thanks a lot for sharing

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Eljay-Adobe • Edited on

I was once in a bad situation — I didn't get along with a person, and likewise that person did not get along with me. I should have extricated myself from that situation about nine months earlier than I did. My bad. Lesson learned. The aftermath: everything was much better.

The next time I was in a similar bad situation (about a decade later), I extricated myself from it in two weeks. Felt good.

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Ali Navidi Author

thanks a lot for sharing!

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TGJ Gilmore

The biggest mistake I made in my career as a Software Engineer was to venture into project management.

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Ali Navidi Author

thanks a lot for sharing! can I ask why?

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TGJ Gilmore • Edited on

1) Team leading is fine and more about supporting your team mates but Project management is more about balancing the books (costs and time) and appeasing senior management.
2) The nature of the project meant the role was a complete switch from technical to managerial, which was not for me.
3) After 3 years it took me another 4 years to get back into a technical role. It made me realise how much a love being and engineer.
The age-old lesson: be careful what you ask for.

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Ali Navidi Author

Wow thanks a lot🙏🏻

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DevFranPR

I'm this women when chosing dev path decisions and Idk what to do at this point honestly
bad-decisions

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Ali Navidi Author

😂

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Pandita

4 years in a toxic job. 0/10 don't recommend.

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Ali Navidi Author

same here for a year, thanks for sharing!

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Tawhid

Trying to master everything.
Thinking that tutorial hell was good.
Not caring about bad practices.
Not writing good code just because of lazyness.
Not making a productive schedule.

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Ali Navidi Author

thanks a lot for sharing!

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AdamDSherman

Pushing through and ignoring burnout. The longer you leave it the worse it gets

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Ali Navidi Author

Thanks a lot for sharing🙏🏻

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Awais Butt

I didn't do some mistake tell in my career when i managing the site bills.com.pk/

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Ali Navidi Author

Thanks for sharing🙏🏻

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Ali Navidi Author

Happy to hear it, thanks🙏🏻