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Discussion on: How To Make Your Ubuntu Desktop Faster

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tiguchi profile image
Thomas Iguchi

I agree that Snap and its evil cousin Flatpak are (currently) junk, but I also understand why they exist. They make it easier for app developers to bundle and deploy their apps to any flavor of Linux, without having to worry about building and maintaining a plethora of different packages in different formats, with different deploy, update and uninstall scripts with different sets of dependencies, different ways of configuring stuff on the platform, that live in different repositories.

Also most Linux package repositories often lag severely behind the latest and greatest of most apps they host. App developers who want to give their non-tech-savvy users immediate access to their latest features and fixes have to either maintain their own repos that are compatible with the Linux distro version they want to support, or they can resort to using Snap. It's a low-hanging fruit.

Here's what I absolutely resent about Snap. It doesn't fully respect my desktop theme and DPI settings. On a 4K monitor with adjusted DPI the mouse cursor appears tiny on Snap application windows. Snap apps also just look different on my machine.
Also it seems that some Snap apps don't have full access to the files in my home directory. I guess it's a security feature, but a pretty annoying one, especially when I want to open or save a file in a directory that cannot be accessed from that Snap application. But maybe it was just a bug in that Markdown editor I tested a while ago. Who knows :-/

These reasons make me prefer the "native" package version of any app over Snap. But sometimes apps are only available through Snap

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aghost7 profile image
Jonathan Boudreau

Also most Linux package repositories often lag severely behind the latest and greatest of most apps they host.

From what I've seen in the wild snaps are often lagging behind as well. The idea of snaps is interesting but it doesn't seem to work in practice.