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I still have to Google...

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Javascript foreach loop syntax.

for(var x as y) {

No...

foreach(var x in y) {

Nope...

... checks...

x.forEach(function(y) {

That’s the one I’m after!

Hi, I’m Jake, a lead developer. I’ve been programming for 15 years, 10 of those professionally.

This is something I continually try to get over to students/new developers. Even after all these years there are things I can’t remember and have to look up.

So, what do you have to google?

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Pretty much anything I don't use on at least a weekly basis. I usually check manpages first though when that's an option, because I can often find what I'm looking for that way far faster than I can with Google.

FWIW, of the languages I've used, I found myself doing it more with JS for core language functionality (that is, stuff that's part of the ECMA standard in this case, as opposed to web API's) than any other language I've tried, even stuff as 'out there' as Erlang or Perl in terms of syntax. And I know quite a few other developers who would almost certainly say the same, which really says something about JS IMO.

 

Yeah I would second that; JS tops it out of all the languages I use.

 
  • when I need to use more than one parameter for the various JS array methods
  • findIndex vs. indexOf
  • slice vs. splice
  • date formatting strings for moment.js
  • the CSS for truncating text to ellipsis

Yep, only been doing this dev thing for 4 years now...

 

Oh jeez, date format strings is another one I don’t think I’ll ever remember. Especially because I spent a lot of time using PHP way back when so I automatically write H:i:s rather than HH:mm:ss when trying to display the time...

 

Switch statements in JS. Every. Single. Time. Also reduce. Both of these just have a syntax that is fairly unique.

 

Take my upvote for having the same problem as me. Nothing in JS is like it (that I've come across yet).

 

Then switch to Python, type out what should be a switch statement, run it, fails... Google it... Slowly remember Python doesn't actually have a built-in switch statement

 

βœ‹πŸ½ Been building things on the web since ~1994. I still "google" things, and have to hit the docs on a regular basis. Absolutely nothing wrong with referencing documentation. That's what it's there for!

If it really makes someone feel better to memorize something -- great! Go for it! I'd rather take a quick peek at some docs, and move on building something! =)

 

Having all the resources available at your fingertips keeps more room in your memory for other things!

Back at a company I used to work for they had an old (dusty now) bookcase which had a ton of old reference books that they used before the days of Google and easily searchable information. Always wondered what it would be like to work back then.

 

I have to google for bootstrap carousel code every time I need it. 😐

 

Just today, I had to Google C# syntax for Case/switch πŸ˜‚ and I've been at this for 6+ years 😁

 

I google lot of syntax things especially as I keep jumping between languages.

If I google something more than 5 times I started to keep notes on it. I started this pretty recently. Now I'm slowly realizing as the number of notes increases looking up a note might take longer than actually googling it XD

 

Needles and haystacks in PHP. I know I could use some kind of intellisense plugin, but I don't wanna.

 
  • Git commands
  • Redux devtools setup
  • Regex stuff
  • CSS grid
  • SCSS functions/loops
  • text-decoration: line-through - I always write "through" wrong... it's quite embarrassing πŸ˜…

Hi! I'm Eric, a front-end developer. I've been programming for 10 years, 8 of those professionally ✌️

 

Well maybe not forEach loop πŸ˜€, but complex things like regex, time formatting, functions like reduce... Sometimes indeed you can google it even if you wrote them one hundred time already!

 

PHP Date formats. If it's outside of Y-m-d, I forget it.

 

Oh god, yes. I mentioned in another comment I always have to check one way or another when switching between languages. HH:mm:ss -- for JS, yep, makes sense. H:i:s -- for PHP whaaa.

 

DuckDuckGo....

For me it is switch syntax. I know it, but I always question myself, idk why. And I have been doing this for 18 years. It’s like a instinct now.

 

A lot of that functional js stuff, most prominently Array functions.
Oh, and CSS Grid.

 

As I look through my browser history, I googled several times for the text equivalent of some Markdown emojis. πŸ˜„

 

I will also never remember the right flags for tar...

 

Most of the time, I'm looking up array methods - especially slice() and splice(), as I haven't yet gotten used to the difference between them. :)

 

I've been doing this software thing for yearsssss... and I'll still forget the arg placements to those.

Don't sweat it.

 

I think it's also because JS doc and examples are the most accessible on the internet. The brain picks the path of least resistance.

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lead developer // mentor & lecturer // pizza devourer