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Sloan
Sloan

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What are some math-heavy jobs in software engineering?

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Next year, I'm going to graduate from university with a B.S. in Mathematics. I've been more and more interested in applying math to computer science in the past year. Are there any software engineering jobs that are math-specific or math-focused? I can't change my major or anything, but it would be cool to know if I can still use this degree and get a job as a developer with my background in math.

Discussion (11)

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sheikh_ishaan profile image
Ishaan Sheikh

Data science, machine learning or AI in which you can work on creating new kind of models which may require some mathematics (I am not an expert in this field). This is also an emerging field in computer science.
However, you can do any kind of job in computer science, but if you are interested in mathematics then the above options you can explore. Also if you not already know this guy check out his YouTube channel, he also has a math major.

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guithomas profile image
Guilherme Thomas

I can't say its true to every role, but the last four jobs I saw to work with compilers and low level engineering required knowledge in math.
Another challenge is hedge funds. They need systems with high-speed operations and salaries reaching 800k/year. Knowing math and c++ sounds really good.

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natescode profile image
Nathan Hedglin

Interesting. I've been digging into compilers a lot. How does one get into a role working with compilers / runtimes ?

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guithomas profile image
Guilherme Thomas
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tsemenski profile image
Terezija Semenski

With a B.S. in Mathematics you can pretty much work anywhere in software development. You would probably enjoy more backend developer role than frontend developer. As a mathematician you are privileged to have great foundation to start job in data science, machine learning, deep learning.

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nitzanhen profile image
Nitzan Hen

I am also a B.Sc student of math, completing this summer (πŸŽ‰πŸŽ‰), and for the past three years I've also been working as a full stack dev.

My degree, however, is more focused on abstract than applied maths (and I wouldn't have it any other way).

Most of the answers below are correct, but I'd like to give my own two cents about it:

Yes, in most tech jobs math will help you, occasionally directly and always indirectly; mathematical patterns of thought and methodologies, as well as some of its abstractions, will help you anywhere in the dev world. And yes, in data science or AI you'll be relying on applied math consistently.

But in my opinion, these are the "easy" options, and I feel as though something's missing from them. Perhaps it's because I'm inclined towards the abstract areas of math, and their impact is not felt as much there, even in math-heavy areas like AI.

I do know, however, that some companies look specifically for developers with a strong math background. as far as I can tell, their products are usually in the same markets AI thrives in, but not necessarily.

For example, I had an interview for a (Math!) student position in a company that deals with 3d imaging and AR. It was easily the most fun I've ever had in an interview - I was literally asked questions related to numerical analysis, topology, graph theory and CS in a single interview. The entire air there was different, and I could tell the interviewer had just as much of an appreciation for "pure" mathematics as I did.

My point is - math will help you anywhere in the dev world, but if you're looking to do actual mathematics in it, rather than work in an area the relies on it, it's an option.

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andrewbaisden profile image
Andrew Baisden

Anything to do with machine learning and data science I would imagine. Like trying to work for NASA.

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madza profile image
Madza

Some answers in this discussion as well πŸ˜‰

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jfitech profile image
Julian

A.I. is a math heavy field, you should look into it.

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charliecodes21 profile image
Charlie

Ohhh I also want to know. I’ll be keeping an eye on this

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amolt profile image
amol-t

Imaging is an area using extensive maths.