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Setting a remote workspace without much space or money

Pachi πŸͺ (she/her/ela)
πŸ™‹πŸ½β€β™€οΈ I am your friendly developer relations personπŸ¦• #DevRel @newrelic; MoΓ§a de DevRel e co-fundadora da @feminis_tech πŸ’Œ Streamer, writer, EN && pt-BR🌟
・1 min read

Happy Saturday folks,
Hope you are all chilling 😚

So, with all this talk on working remotely because of the virus, and in my case it is more because I may have gotten a full time remote web dev job, I want some tips.

I live with my in-laws so I don't have lots of space. And I am not working for a super big company so I also don't have lots of money.

Give me your best tips to create a nice space to code that won't break my bank or my back/neck.

Discussion (3)

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Patrick Charles-Lundaahl

I don't work full remote, but I do work from home quite often. The things that help me the most:

Ergonomics
Make sure your workstation supports good posture. Back pain sucks, and it will creep up on you.

  • Don't hunch over your laptop. Get an external monitor, or a keyboard and mouse.
  • Research it up front! Proper monitor and keyboard height are huge.
  • Desks with adjustable height can help a lot. Alternatively, a keyboard tray can help you get your keyboard at the right level.
  • Don't skimp on your chair (assuming you sit)! You'll be spending 8 hours a day in it.

Mood
This is a big one for me. I find staying positive when I'm in the same environment day-in day-out can be a real challenge.

  • Keep your space clean! I spend a bit of time cleaning at the end of each day, so that I can start each day fresh.
  • Lighting can help a ton. It's also nice to get some decent illumination for video calls, so it doesn't look like you're sitting in a dungeon.
  • Try to separate your work and off-times. It can be hard to leave work stuff at work when it's also your home. Using a different computer (or at least a different account) for work can help. Also, having some sort of ritual, like work lighting and personal lighting to set the mood.

I hope these help! They're the big ones for me. Good luck, and congrats in the new gig!

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ben profile image
Ben Halpern

Tasteful minimalism, used furniture, if you're talking about hardware, learn to love Linux.

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Alex Turner

I'm just learning to code but have been a home-based worker for the best part of the last 15 years and spend much time in front of a screen analysing notes and writing reports. I'm a family man with a wife and four kids. Time, money and space all need to be managed. Here are some tips to myself that might be good for you to:

1. A 'nice space' starts in your own head. Notice when that space is a mess and take action to tidy up.

2. I go to bed before 11 pm so I can get up and start work by 6.00 am. I can get more done in the three hours before 9.00 am than at any other time in the day.

3. Linux and FOSS for everything I possibly can.

4. Cull generic social media. Be ruthless. It can be a massive distraction. Time is money.

5. Sort out basic ergonomics. Good enough will do.

6. Be sure to get some exercise and move about from time to time. Pomodoro or something like that can be a good friend to you.

7. Stay connected. Hook up and have face time with positive people.

8. Celebrate a finished piece of work before jumping into the next. Avoid the hamster wheel.

9. Keep a journal. You are your own supervisor at home. It helps to reflect.

10. Things around you at home could always be better. Accept that. Let go of any need to have things just so. Enough is plenty. Good enough will do!