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Cover image for Pure CSS trick to create a blurred backdrop
mohsen
mohsen

Posted on • Originally published at blog.dotenx.com

Pure CSS trick to create a blurred backdrop

One of the beauties of CSS is that you can apply significant effects to your elements without having to use image editing tools such as Photoshop.

In this short tutorial, we'll see how to create an appealing design by setting a blurred background for a text.

As always, I'm using DoTenX(https://dotenx.com) UI-builder to build the page and immediately get the result and publish it. You can create your free account as well if you haven't done already and create unlimited projects/pages.

Remember, when you create a project on DoTenX switch to advanced mode as we want to have full control over the page styles.

Step 1:

Add a Box element to the page which renders a div in our page.

Step 2:

Go to the css properties in the styles tab and set the following propery-values:

* Image from Freepik.com

The focus of this post is not Flexbox, but if you want to learn more about Flexbox, take a look at this post: Learn CSS layouts by example - Flex.

Step 3:

Add another Box to our flex container and add these styles to the element:

  • width: 500px

  • height: 300px

  • display: flex

  • align-items: center

  • justify-content: center

  • border-width: 2px

  • border-style: solid

  • border-color: #fff

This is what we've created so far:

Step 4:

Add a Text to the smaller Box that we just created and set its css properties as follows:

  • font-size: 3.75rem

  • color: white

  • font-family: Arial Black

As you can see the text is not perfectly readable. All the magic happens in step 5.

Step 5:

Add the following css property to the smaller box with white border:

  • backdrop-filter: blur(5px)

And this is the end result:

As you can see the end result looks much better with a very simple CSS property.

You can find the published result here.


Don't forget to create your FREE account at https://dotenx.com and you can Redeem this code (if you're quick enough before it ends) to even get more resources: h1zBW9kf.

Top comments (2)

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jonrandy profile image
Jon Randy 🎖️

How is using a documented CSS feature a "trick"? Why not just be honest that this is just an ad for dotenx?

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mohsenkamrani profile image
mohsen • Edited on

Appreciate your comment and I feel bad if you feel like this has been dishonest, but every single piece of content I share is in the context of DoTenX.

Let's put it this way. Can you use what I showed you here without DoTenX or not?
If you were the creator of VSCode (if there was such a thing), wouldn't you post your tutorials all using VSCode?

Also, let's not demonise showcasing the result of your hard work as a software developer (which I believe you're one or will be) in the context it's exactly built for.

DoTenX is literally built for this purpose and you cannot expect me, who is the founder of such platform, to use any other platform to talk about the most relevant topics. Wouldn't you ask why don't you use what you've built if it's made for this purpose?

Hope I've addressed your concern and let's not forget, being a software developer means is like being a musician. You want others to enjoy what you've composed and at the same time you enjoy the appreciation for what you've done.

By the way regarding the topic, it might be a trivial to you while it's a nice trick you can do to get this result. Also I used a screenshot of the end result as the thumbnail so you know what you're gonna get from this post. Let me know how you'd improve the topic.

Also happy to jump on a call and have a good chat about it if you're still not convinced.

Let's team up together 🤝

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