re: My development environment setup (Part 1) VIEW POST

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re: I still don't understand this idea that Linux somehow has something that Windows doesn't when it comes to development. I develop in multiple langua...
 

See my post below about coming from a Unix background...

For me, until Windows 10 introduced WSL, it was not a place I could get my work done in a way that I found productive. I use a visual code editor (vscode) when doing much of my actual coding but for the other times, I am editing configs, running scripts, testing out code in REPLs, doing package management, using git... Etc. For all those things I immediately turn to the command line. Vi is magic for quickly editing a conf file. Bash/zsh are great for simple but powerful scripting. Yum/apt/etc are great for quickly getting software on your machine. Node or python or Elixir are great to test ideas out in their interactive modes on the cli. Cli is the fastest and, in my opinion, easiest way to use git. It's all made powerful by a great terminal and great shell. I find Windows lacking in both... until wsl came along.

 

I just find that really difficult to contemplate. I've been a Windows user all my life. I edit config files in Notepad++ and really don't understand the need for anything else. I use git through a standard CMD prompt in Windows and again have never needed anything more when I've been developing in .Net, Java, JavaScript, Python, PHP and PL/SQL.

I don't mean any disrespect but the point is that you will never contemplate the *nix way if you don't try it seriously. The only problem there is with Linux, in my opinion, is that starting is hard. I was lucky to have a lot of friends that help me go through the first steps of learning.

It's not a problem with starting with Linux. I'm fluent in using Linux from having to learn it at University but the point here is after using both Windows and Linux I fail to find any issues with just using Windows. It just seems everyone seems to be using Linux to develop on because it is seen as 'trendy' rather than actually being more productive.

I can't talk for others, but provisioning tools such as SaltStack, the POSIX terminal (that I'm sorry, Powershell is a long way off) and the ease of use of SSH (in both ways), all of that combined with the fact that the majority of servers on the Internet are running Linux (and the place I worked and my VPS provider does too) and the cost of Microsoft license is the reason why I prefer Linux over Windows. Furthermore, I've always hated the Windows Filesystem. I can't count the number of time I had ACL issues on Windows, sometimes I needed to use third-party super-user plugin to force a folder to be read-write for everyone (like an upload folder for instance).

I'm not a stubborn person, and I can admit that VisualStudio is probably the best IDE, after trying IntelliJ, Eclipse, Netbeans and XCode. SQL Server is a real good SGBD for the price to pay (compare to IBM DB2 or Oracle Database 12i). The real problem is the licensing: so complicated for nothing. SQL Server can be bought per number of people connecting, or per core processor. You are forced to buy Windows Enterprise or higher.

Lastly, Linux can run efficiently on older, less powerful computer compare to Windows. Running a dozen websites on a Windows server costing 4k might not be to the reach of small enterprise. It may be more efficient to buy 3, less powerful computers, to run with a load balancing, a fail-over system that cost the same price running Linux. The money you spend on licenses (that can easily cost in the thousands) can be invested in training. To be fair, it is easier to find professional for windows compare to Linux.

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