re: Why I Turned Down My First Ever Full Time Development Job


 VIEW POST

FULL DISCUSSION
 

I think you've got the right ideas, Bryan! I just started my second job out of a coding bootcamp and have a little more perspective on the job hunt for bootcamp grads.

I think valuing mentorship at your first job is a must! (Sidenote: don't think of asking questions of your peers as "pestering". If you've joined a company that's open to helping you grow, they won't think of it as pestering, either - it's learning opportunities for the whole team!)

Keep looking for other opportunities and talking with people at existing companies. I'd recommend meeting up with people who are employed for coffee to just to pick their brain on their experiences as developers. I've had good experience with this as really low-stress networking where you can learn about good companies in the area as well as make connections without asking for the person to do anything for you other than chat.

 

(Sidenote: don't think of asking questions of your peers as "pestering". If you've joined a company that's open to helping you grow, they won't think of it as pestering, either - it's learning opportunities for the whole team!)

+1 to this!

 

Thank you for the advice! I full-heartedly agree with doing coffee mingles with other developers. Here in Tel Aviv there is a coffee meetup open to all developers in the area which is a very nice way to start the morning before work while also getting to know a diverse set of developers from all over the area

 

Even experienced devs don't know everything, nobody does. It's always great to ask questions, provided you do a bit of work upfront first.

 

I completely agree with you here. A quote resonates with me and I can't seem to find the exact wording, however it goes similar to this: " A master is both always a master and an apprentice". No one fully understands everything like you said, and there's always opportunity for improvement and learning. I also agree with you regarding work put in. I do believe that you should strive to find the answer on your own for the most part as you can gain a lot to learn. However, there's a big difference in asking, "hey what are some articles you recommend me to dive into that are more relevant to this problem?" versus "what's the answer?" .. At the bootcamp I work for, we place an emphasis to sit down with the students and then we do the research together to find an answer rather than just giving it to them straight away. The old: "Give a man a fish he can eat for a day, teach a man to fish he can eat for a lifetime"

code of conduct - report abuse