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My first ASP.NET application/Masterpage

kritner profile image Russ Hammett Originally published at kritner.blogspot.com on ・1 min read

I had been having a few issues when attempting to get asp.net applications working on my web server - not knowing much of anything about asp.net, I was under the assumption it would be similar to the ColdFusion I am used to; it was not.

The thing I didn't understand, which this entry exists to remind me (and potentially any youse out there), is AppPools. IIS seems to by default assign your web root to an appPool - the default (at least for me) being .NET framework 2.0. It is as simple as changing the Default website to a new appPool using the 4.0 framework right? Almost...

Having changed the default appPool to 4.0 framework I was now successfully compiling the standard "Hello World" .aspx - but getting run-time errors when attempting to integrate a master page into my site. A master-page is a 'template' of sorts that can be used to create similar layout/functionality across numerous sites. The run-time error was explaining that my MasterPage.master could not be found at ~/MasterPage.master - but it was there!

Luckily my wife Kristen was there (who does know ASP.net) to let me know that if I have my application within a directory in of itself, but the application is set up in a separate directory, then the "~/MasterPage.master" reference is relative to the application, not necessarily the directory that you are working in.

Simple fix? Create a new application pool on the directory where my code is actually hosted. Yay! Now everything is working without run time errors!

Discussion

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ajbozdar profile image
A. J. Bozdar

None of the articles written on ASP are gaining attraction. Does this mean it is a dead stack?

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kritner profile image
Russ Hammett Author

Well I mean there is .net core now, and this was written several years ago - and even at that time MVC was a thing, and this is based in webforms.

I know webforms is still used, so I don't think it's dead by any means. But I wouldn't think there'd be too many new projects built with asp.net webforms, but that's just a feeling, no data to back it up.

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ajbozdar profile image
A. J. Bozdar

I know asp.net was booming in 2012. I saw my friends learning and implementing it. I made wrong choices in those days, but now I have an opportunity to join a bootcamp where instructors believe asp.net/.net core has a great future ahead.

Should I jump in or not? I do not want to make a wrong choice again. I have written about it here. dev.to/ajbozdar/enroll-or-not-to-e...

Your feedback is highly appreciated.

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kritner profile image
Russ Hammett Author

I highly enjoy working with C#, and .net core offers C# on all the major OSes, so I mean, I'd say go for it! There's a pretty good market for it here, seems like anyway. And if nothing else, it's something else for your toolbelt! :)

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ajbozdar profile image
A. J. Bozdar

Your words are exactly what the instructor said me. Thank you very much for the feedback. I highly appreciate it, and this will help me to redefine my career.