re: acme/acme2k: A lesson in sane IDE defaults. VIEW POST

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I disagree on almost every point. The "productive developer" bit about mostly writing new code is a pipe dream. It is well understood that more time is spent reading and editing exieting code than developing new code. Also, syntax highlighting absolutely helps with code readability, but I will give you that much of the benefit comes from emphasizing keywords and de-emphasizing comments. A good syntax highligting colorscheme with a good font does wonders when you stare at text most of the day.

I do slightly agree about configurability, but from the viewpoint of a vimmer. Emacs is a great concept, but the configurability makes it almost like a custom-built editor. Vim can be the same way with some people, but the core modes and navigation/editing "language" are fairly universal. I may not be able to use custom key bindings and plugins on your vim, but at least I will be able to get the job done with the standard commands. Vim has a greater focus on providing the same interface, regardless of all the configuration.

I'm sure people can develop just fine without mastering vim/emacs, but mouse liberation has been nothing but an enhancement for me.

 

The "productive developer" bit about mostly writing new code is a pipe dream.

Depends on the project, I guess...

 

Do you really think you write code more than you read it? I suppose if you mainly work solo on projects you might do "write only" programming. I'd still think that later on in he project you would be editing more than writing brand new code from scratch. I work mostly in embedded C, so ymmv, but even when I'm doing python scripts I edit way more than I write.

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