DEV Community

Jon Randy
Jon Randy

Posted on

๐Ÿคฌ Which parts of your job do you hate?

Since you're all on DEV - I think it's safe to assume that you probably like development, or at the very least are interested in it... but if you're one of those who are lucky(?) enough to do it as a career - which parts of the job do you really dislike?

Discussion (32)

Collapse
jonrandy profile image
Jon Randy Author • Edited on

For me, I really dislike:

  • Structured process (Scrum, JIRA, etc.)
  • HR/management stuff (KPIs, career goals etc.)
  • Basically anything that gets in the way of just getting down and being creative with code
Collapse
jonrandy profile image
Jon Randy Author

Oh... and React

Collapse
bibekkhatri profile image
Bibek Khatri

What's the reason to diskike React?

Thread Thread
jkhaui profile image
Jordy Lee

I second this. I'm genuinely curious as to whether people who hate React think it's "easier" or "better" for large dev teams to build modern, complex web appsโ€”which, at any given moment, could exist in a near-infinite combination of states and state transitionsโ€”in vanilla JavaScript?

Or maybe I'm on the wrong path here, and said React-haters come from traditional CS backgrounds where anything that doesn't strictly adhere to OOP and its 4 attendant pillars is seen as the work of the Devil. In which case, I'm gonna put my career on the line here and say I hate OOP and would choose alternate paradigms (e.g. FP) without blinking an eye.

Or maybe I should stop generalising and accept that there's likely a multitude of reasons people may dislike React, many of which I might not be aware of.

Collapse
johnden profile image
JohnDen

LMAO, same as Structured process .

But I like React๐Ÿคฃ

Collapse
cubiclesocial profile image
cubiclesocial

JIRA is a poorly designed piece of software. You're forgiven for ever having to use it. Whoever thinks JIRA, Confluence, Salesforce, Dayforce, and other commonly deployed enterprise solutions is good software is only kidding themselves. It's also rather expensive to license those products - the per-seat cost is astronomical (i.e. the "call us" variety).

Having goals in life is a good thing. HR means for the best. But the method of execution always seems to come off rather awkwardly in a semi-disconnected-from-reality sort of way. They are fine folks but they have to toe the line between the business/financial side and the personal side.

Collapse
rammina profile image
Rammina

Freelance web developer here. Looking for a client and handling negotiations.

If it has to be a technical aspect, it's probably dealing with the security of an application.

Collapse
jonrandy profile image
Jon Randy Author • Edited on

I've never really freelanced that much, and when I did I was lucky enough to have clients who were happy to pay by the hour - so there was little negotiation involved. I can't imagine I would enjoy that part of freelancing very much either

Collapse
ben profile image
Ben Halpern

My first work was freelancing and client negotiations were the worst.

I sort of feel like having had enough time away from this kind of work, I'd probably only re-enter if I knew I had a really strong game plan on how to set boundaries and handle all of this stuff systematically. It seems like this can be 80%+ of the work at times, when I'd prefer 80%+ being on the work itself.

Thread Thread
rammina profile image
Rammina

yeah, spending most of my time looking for clients and negotiating with them is one of the things I dislike about freelancing. I just want to do actual work instead of social legwork.

Collapse
rammina profile image
Rammina

yeah it's a pain

Collapse
meatboy profile image
Meat Boy

Overengineering. I didn't knew before is possible to spend so much time on discussing how to reinvent the wheel. Some people may tell it's ensuring the quality but for me, for QA responsible are tests and code review.

Collapse
jonrandy profile image
Jon Randy Author

I think this does indeed happen a lot. I think most developers, given the choice, would prefer to build as many things as possible themselves - there's more of a feeling of learning and accomplishment in this - you feel more like an actual architect/developer than a manual labourer. Obviously not the best approach in a business setting though :)

Collapse
rsmets profile image
Ray Smets

Code review is for the birds.

Collapse
ben profile image
Ben Halpern

I'm not a full-time developer anymore โ€” which I mostly miss. One thing I definitely don't miss from my particular career (mostly small startups) is the severe on-call needs. I really felt like I could never be too far from my computer, and would have a lot of "unknown unknowns" anxiety.

Collapse
jonrandy profile image
Jon Randy Author

Interesting - even in very small companies I've always managed to keep a very clear separation between work and life

Collapse
sahez97 profile image
Sahz

On call is dreadful

Collapse
jonrandy profile image
Jon Randy Author

Never experienced that. Can't be fun

Collapse
dominikbraun profile image
DB

If you're in the customer projects business:

  • Weird customer requirements and technical requirements from non-technical people.
  • Badly negotiated deadlines. There's nothing worse than a management that doesn't dare to tell the customer that a project or feature will take longer than desired and agrees upon unrealistic deadlines.

Luckily I got out of this business, I'm doing product development now. Others:

  • Badly maintained legacy code.
  • Features with unclear acceptance criteria.
  • Attending meetings that aren't relevant for me.
Collapse
noahflk profile image
Noah

Unnecessary meetings

Collapse
jonrandy profile image
Jon Randy Author • Edited on

One company I worked for actually told employees that if they found themselves in a meeting that they thought was not relevant to them - to simply say so, and leave

Collapse
theaccordance profile image
Joe Mainwaring

Support Rotations

As a concept, I don't mind support, but I switched from IT into Engineering to get away from the bottom tier of support after performing the duty for the entirety of the 2000s.

Having Sunset projects pulled off the shelf

In 2018 the company I was working for was acquired. The project I had been leading was discontinued in favor of a competing project with a more favorable tech stack. Personally, I was relieved because it allowed me to dodge the tech debt that had begun to pile up in the project, and I used the opportunity to dictate what I wanted to work on next. Unfortunately, the CEO decided to pull the project off the shelf a few months later to appease one of the company's largest customers.

Thankfully, leadership opted to hire contractors to pick up on the discontinued project, but it was a few stressful days before that choice had been decided.

Customers

Simply put, some customers end up being assholes, either taking up a disproportionate amount of time or by belittling those who they communicate with. When you're just a member on a team and not in charge of the product, you can't fire the customer for their bad behavior.

Poor Performers

It can be very frustrating when you have team members who are poorly performing and impacting your workflow. This could be a fellow engineer, but it could also be a product manager, customer support, or QA. I've nudged leadership on more than one occasion in the past to hold poor performers accountable in order to stabilize the team and manage expectations.

Collapse
cubiclesocial profile image
cubiclesocial

The only thing I really dislike are meetings where nothing is decided and nothing happens as a result. The best meetings have at least one action step because that means there is some forward momentum even if it is just one little baby step.

The only thing I dislike more than the above is the next meeting where those who had something to do from the previous meeting did absolutely none of the action steps. The outcome of such meetings is the exact same set of action steps from the previous meeting. And tends to lead to no forward progress made for multiple meetings in a row.

I also somewhat dislike how some people see they have a meeting later that same day and start blasting out a bunch of emails to get their previously assigned tasks done in advance of the meeting. I'm pretty sure those people are the sort of folks who waited until the last minute to do their homework for school (sometimes 5 minutes before the next class started). I understand that sometimes it's not possible to do due to a very busy schedule but it should be rare rather than a constant. The behavior also indicates what those people think about the priority of the project. They might say the project is important just to sound good but it's clearly not a priority for them.

On a software development front, the only thing I dislike is spending 6 hours on a bug only to find I mistyped a variable name by one character - or something equivalently braindead that I should have spotted immediately but didn't. Sure I get paid for those 6 hours but it's a massive waste of time and money. It happens but I don't have to like it.

Collapse
karthik2265 profile image
Karhik Suryadevara

Designing the app ๐Ÿ‘จโ€๐Ÿ’ป, sometimes one design seems nice but once the styling is applied i think this could look better and keep on changing the styles endlessly.

Iam talking about web apps, i do not have much experience with mobile app development

Collapse
sherrydays profile image
Sherry Day

Disagreements in approaches where there aren't necessarily "right answers" โ€” just lots of heuristics and pet approaches.

Collapse
philipp__6424ee1faaca7b14 profile image
Philipp

Anything that is not related to coding, e. g. leading a group of developers.

Collapse
freita_browning profile image
Freita Browning

BDA in Edutech organization like byju's

Collapse
johnden profile image
JohnDen

Fix the UI issue when I was a frontend-developer

Collapse
jonrandy profile image
Jon Randy Author

Hence the 'was' in that sentence, I assume ๐Ÿ™‚

Collapse
zubair314 profile image
Zubair314

Media cury

Collapse
unimafy profile image
Nima Yonten

When I make silly stupid mistakes.

Collapse
zoreankit profile image
ZoreAnkit

I hate to be involved in process which doesn't include development.Eg Operations