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Discussion on: I'm An Impostor

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jmau111 profile image
Julien Maury

A huge part of the job consists of learning new things. Even if you don't know it yet, you can learn it.

The key is efficiency, whether you use command lines or not.

For example, if you don't use a GUI to resolve git conflicts, you are probably doing it wrong, but command lines are sometimes mandatory to solve specific issues.

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webketje profile image
webketje

Some examples where command-line is more interesting to invest in:

  • Changing environment/ tools. If you're consultant learning command line pays off way better than using a GUI (company A requires everyone use IntelliJ, company B Visual Code)
  • No local development possible, no TTY on remote server: you can only use command-line.
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bytebodger profile image
Adam Nathaniel Davis Author

If you're consultant learning command line pays off way better than using a GUI (company A requires everyone use IntelliJ, company B Visual Code)

I totally understand this point - although... my "answer" to this has been to not even consider opportunities anymore where the employer tries to dictate my toolset. I've had people contact me about Java opportunities, and then they tell me that, "The whole team is standardized on Eclipse." And... that's the end of the discussion for me.

I know that everyone doesn't have the same luxury. But I've actually run into this and I think it's borderline insane. After wrestling for years with Eclipse, and then seeing the night-and-day difference in writing Java in IntelliJ, I'm simply never writing another line of Java code in Eclipse again. If the employer thinks it's critical that I use the same IDE as everyone else on the team, then I am definitely not a good fit for that employer.

All that being said, I know that my little retort here is a diversion - and your central point is understood, and solid.

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darkwiiplayer profile image
DarkWiiPlayer

If the employer thinks it's critical that I use the same IDE as everyone else on the team

Then the employer is probably wondering why none of the top applicants end up taking the job and always end up picking the other company where the boss isn't micro-managing what socks they wear on thursdays.

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bytebodger profile image
Adam Nathaniel Davis Author

This is a great point. I will admit that, in the past, with certain tools that have command line interfaces and GUI interfaces, I have sometimes spent too much time trying to figure out how to do something through the GUI when I could've just done it with one or two terminal commands. But I didn't do it because the command line syntax felt obtuse to me, and I was resistant to learn it. But I would've solved the problem faster if I was not so stubborn (because I usually ended up having to complete the task... by doing it in the terminal anyway). In other words, my "sin" was not that I wasn't already adept at the command line. My "sin" was that I was stubborn and thus, I was working inefficiently.

With nearly any class of problem, I'm not so much concerned with whether you've already memorized how to fix it. I'm much more concerned with whether you know where-and-how to search for the answers (cuz that, in itself, is a skill). Noobs will burn a lotta time randomly clicking through poorly-focused google searches. For seasoned pros, even when they don't already have the solution in mind, they can leverage the internet as something like the 3rd lobe of their brain.

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jmau111 profile image
Julien Maury

I agree with you, you have to learn how to learn and learn how to search. With experience, things get more intuitive, even when you're not in your comfort zone.