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Fulton Browne
Fulton Browne

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When did you consider yourself a developer?

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Enrique Moreno Tent

When I got paid for the first time :)

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Carolyn Stransky

Same! Or when I got my first contract with "Developer" in the title πŸ˜„

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Enrique Moreno Tent

Hopefully that was also the first time you were paid :D

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Carolyn Stransky

Yes! Definitely paid - but I also worked as a technical writer before my first frontend gig, so that was more blurry. I was writing code as part of my job but didn't feel like a developer yet.

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Jim Gardiner

Still trying to figure that out after 15 years.

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Corey McCarty

I considered myself a developer when I finally got hired. I considered myself a competent developer once I got to the point where I could meaningfully take part in planning/discussions for an application I didn't have lots of experience with, but I could contribute simply on knowledge of how things should be done.

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Ryan

When I first started to learn programming, I thought "Once I've completed a lot of large-scale projects, then I'll be a developer!" That whole idea made my have anxiety once I completed a project. I would wonder, "Is this project big enough? Am I a 'developer' now? Do I have enough projects yet?" I've since changed that definition to just anyone who likes to program at all, which I think is a lot better. :)

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Fulton Browne

That is how I started out also, thx Ryan.

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COLC Ltd.

When I changed from Web Dev after 10 years of dealing with other peoples crap CSS ...
to mobile dev when I had to figure out the whole app from start to finish.... and UI design.. and Marketing ... myself :)

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Will Velida

When I got my first job. After years of struggling to teach myself how to code, build projects that weren't really that good and applying like mad to all kinds of jobs, getting that contract was a really big win for me 😊

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Eric Ahnell

I was a developer after my first exposure to code, over 31.5 years ago! Unlike most budding coders, I skipped "Hello World" and wrote "Guess the Random Number" as my first program. I even revised it twice: v1.1 added better hints for wrong guesses, and v2.0 added both a special screen for your 1st guess being right, and an Easter egg: Enter 0 as a guess, and the number is revealed. This doesn't increment your guess count either.

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Madza • Edited

It's a path not a destination.

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Hamza Anis

When I wrote a simple `cout << "Hello world"<<endl;

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Baily Case

When I started to write and share code. I could argue that if you can even write code you are a developer.

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Zane Milakovic

When I built my first game or website. It was many years later when I got paid. But I was β€œdeveloping”.

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Jon Randy πŸŽ–οΈ

When, at age 7, I wrote my first BASIC program on my ZX Spectrum 48K back in 1983

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