re: How do you stand up to these issues at work? VIEW POST

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re: When I got my firs job, my salary got delayed, like 10 days. I was a bit worried and needy at that time. But also afraid to ask my boss and when I ...

Oof. Yeah. As anti-labor as the laws in the US tend to be when compared to some countries, the laws aren't nearly as stacked in the employers' favor as they are in other parts of the world.

Here in Italy, the average time to get paid starts from “30 days forward”, when you’re lucky.
The worst client (a VERY famous italian fashion brand), took 13 (yes, I wrote thirteen!) months to pay the bill. And even if we have barely decent laws about it, the reality is sadly different.

In the US:

  • If you're on a W2 basis ("salaried"), it's decently-common for employers to have a "first check held" policy. Inconvenient if you wanted to take a break between jobs. Freaking awful if you moved to a job with a "once-a-month" pay-schedule and had no meaningful savings (or PTO cashout) left from a prior job. On the plus side, if your prior employer was a "first check held" employer, it generally means you have one more check after you do the final walk out the door.
  • If you're working on a 1099 basis (pure contractor or B2B), things are a lot more hit-or-miss on when you can expect compensation to arrive. While 13 months would be quite unusual (bean-counters hate carrying things across to the next fiscal-period - especially if the term in longer than a fiscal-year), 1-3 months behind wouldn't be unexpected. If you're pure 1099 with multiple contracts/customers, you might have multiple payment terms to deal with. Makes managing personal finances "fun".

I don't think we have a "first check held" policy here. One to three months notice prior resignation is a common thing though!

Even though I had an "at will" sort of contract with this company, I had to notify them before I leave, at least a month prior to my resignation.

In my previous job, when I resigned, I did file a notice and stuff! But they never paid me my last salary. So, that's a pretty common thing (I hope it doesn't happen this time)!

I don't think we have a "first check held" policy here. One to three months notice prior resignation is a common thing though!

Oof. In the US, two weeks is customary. However, in the technology field, it's not unusual to find that, the day you submit your resignation is the day they walk you out the door. This is especially so if you have privileged access to anything.

The whole basis for "notice" is the idea that you're doing them the courtesy of letting them hire someone in before you leave (so as to reduce the impact of that departure). That said, given the timetables behind finding suitable replacements (and the prior not about treatment of personnel with privileged access), that custom is starting to fade in some places.

But they never paid me my last salary. So, that's a pretty common thing (I hope it doesn't happen this time)!

Oof... In the US, an employer doing that with anything approaching regularity would set them up for a non-trivial penalty via litigative loss.

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