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Java isn't any trend of 2021...?

e99h2121 profile image YAMADA Nobuko ・2 min read

I love Java.

I read Software Development Trends in 2021.

Also, Developer Roadmaps
https://roadmap.sh/
The 2021 Web Developer Roadmap
This is the 2021 edition.

What are your plans to read/learn in 2021?

Looks so exciting!
50 free tools and resources

Books.
Eight must-read books for developers in 2021

However, what about Java?
Recently I have no idea about Java except minor improvement.
Java 15 / JDK 15
https://mail.openjdk.java.net/pipermail/announce/2020-September/000291.html
http://openjdk.java.net/projects/jdk/15/spec/
or GC, Performance improvement.

What about Top 10 In-Demand programming languages to learn in 2020?

They are saying:

In recent years, Java has lost some of its markets to highly developer-friendly modern languages and the rise of other languages, especially Python, JavaScript. Also, JVM is not quite Cloud friendly because of its bulky size. Oracle has recently introduced hefty licensing fees for JDK, which will dent Java’s popularity further.
Fortunately, Java is working on its shortcomings and making Java fit for Cloud via the GraalVM initiative. Also, in OpenJDK, there is a free alternative to the proprietary Oracle JDK.
Java is still the number one programming language for enterprises.

True. I'm using Java in my job for enterprises. I love Java.
But there may be no topic which can be the big wave like JavaScript or frontend ...

I'm afraid that Java can be next COBOL in this way...?

Discussion (2)

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Sergiy Yevtushenko

All those articles you mention as well as TIOBE index and other stuff, has nothing to do with real usage of any language. I think that Java now in the position when it above all hypes or trends. It's enough to take a look at any job site and realize that demand for Java is high and growing.

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Alain Van Hout

The next release of Java may include project Loom, which brings with it lightweight threads (similar to kotlin's coroutines). That will be a game-changer for Java web development, I think.