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Bit Project

Serverless Music Player

Rishik Hombal
Updated on ・15 min read

GitHub Repository

Check out my website!


Abstract

This project is a music player built in React using Typescript and SASS. The application features a library allowing
users to select which song they would like to play and also includes play, pause, skip, and seek functionality.
Additionally, the app is mobile friendly and is capable of resizing and restructuring to have a pleasant user experience
on devices with a smaller form factor. One of the main reasons I made the project is to have a single place where I can
listen to music - particularly open access music. There are many times when I hear a song in a YouTube intro or outro,
and it is very inconvenient for me to listen to that song. Sometimes these songs aren't available on Spotify, so I have
to hunt for a Soundcloud profile, or some other service that I can use to listen to this song, and then every time I
want to listen to this song, I will need to return to this service. This application removes that need. Instead of going
to many different services, users can stay in this application and stream all of their open access music. This allows
for a much more convenient listening experience for an end user, and hopefully, this will lead to them listening to
smaller artists who are not on big music streaming services such as Spotify or Apple Music.


My setup and I

Project picture
Project picture


A React Music Player to listen to and discover small artists creating open access music

Hello everyone! My name is Rishik, and I'll walk you through the steps on how to replicate my application for the
Bitproject Serverless Camp. The main purpose of this project is to help users have a more cohesive experience when
finding and listening to music from smaller artists. Instead of visiting many different sites in order to find a certain
song to listen to, users can stay on this one site and listen to all the music they want.

In this tutorial, we will focus on writing the display code first, then styling, finally we will look at how to provide
data using an Azure Function. Before we start, here are some technologies you should be familiar with:

  • Javascript
  • Typescript
  • React
  • CSS
  • SASS

To begin, we will create a React application using a Typescript template. You can use your preferred way of doing this,
but I will use
npx create-react-app app-name --template typescript. To prevent any errors, make sure that your application name is in
all lowercase and any words are separated by dashes. Next, to add SASS to our application, we will use the
command npm install node-sass.

Now we will start building the application. First for organization, we are going to create two folders inside our src
directory. Call these folders components and styles. The create-react-app template gives us some starter files and
code. Most of this we will not need. In fact, keep only the App.tsx, index.tsx, react-app-env.d.ts, and App.css files.
In the App.tsx file, delete all the code within the function, and rename the App.css file to App.scss and move it
to your styles folder.

Next, within your components folder, create five .tsx
files: Library.tsx, LibrarySong.tsx, Nav.tsx, Player.tsx, and Song.tsx and import React from 'react' at the top of
each. Create corresponding scss files for each of those except LibrarySong.tsx Now, going back to the App.tsx file,
we are ready to start writing some code. First, we will need to write some utility functions to perform some actions
within our application. First, we are going to write code to update the current time of our song. To do that, we're
going to create a time update handler function like so:

const timeUpdateHandler = (event: any) => {
    const currentTime = event.target.currentTime;
    const duration = event.target.duration;

    const roundedCurrentTime = Math.round(currentTime);
    const roundedDuration = Math.round(duration);
    const animationPercent = Math.round((roundedCurrentTime / roundedDuration) * 100);
};
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This function takes in the event that is fired whenever a song's current time changes and then it does some math to
output the current time in the song. It also determines how much of the progress bar should be filled at a given time.
You may notice that despite this function doing a lot of computation, the results of this computation are not used
anywhere. To use these results, we will add the current song info to the state. To do this, we must first
import useState from react, then we have to create a Type for this state so that we keep with Typescript's concept of
strongly typing all parts of our application that we can. Create a types.ts file somewhere within the src directory to
hold all the types we will use for this application. For this particular part of state, we will create a type called
SongInfo.

export type SongInfo = {
    currentTime: number;
    duration: number;
    animationPercent: number;
}
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This creates a type with three properties. The current time, duration, and the percent that the progress bar should be
filled. We can now go back to the App.tsx file and import this type.

Now, using the useState hook in React, we will create a state hook storing the song info.

const [songInfo, setSongInfo] = useState<SongInfo>({
    currentTime: 0,
    duration: 0,
    animationPercent: 0
});
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As you may recall, useState has two parts. A getter to return the current value of the state, and a mutator to change
the state. Here, songInfo is our getter, and setSongInfo is our mutator. We must also include an initial value for
the state. Now going back to the handler we wrote, we can add the values to the state.


setSongInfo({ ...songInfo, currentTime, duration, animationPercent });

Now, lets add some more types and parts of state to set us up for building the rest of the application. Going back to
the types.ts file, we can add a new type.

export interface SongModel {
    name: string;
    cover: string;
    artist: string;
    audio: string;
    color: string[];
    id: string;
    active: boolean;
}
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This allows us to store the information for each song we send to our application. Going back to the App.tsx file, lets
add some more state We need to add some parts of state to check if our library bar is open, to store our songs, to
determine what our current song is, and to determine whether a song is playing. We will do this in a similar way to our
last piece of state.

const [isLibraryOpen, setIsLibraryOpen] = useState(false);
const [songs, setSongs] = useState<SongModel[]>([{
    color: [],
    id: "",
    active: false,
    artist: "",
    audio: "",
    cover: "",
    name: ""
}]);
const [currentSong, setCurrentSong] = useState<SongModel>(songs[0]);
const [isPlaying, setIsPlaying] = useState(false);
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Now let's add another handler to skip to the next song when the current one ends.

const songEndHandler = async () => {
    let currIndex = songs.findIndex(song => song.id === currentSong.id);
    await setCurrentSong(songs[(currIndex + 1) % songs.length]);
    if (isPlaying)
        await audioRef.current.play();
};
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This async handler determines which song has just ended, and then goes to the next song. If the previous song was
playing, this next song will also play when it is loaded.

Now, we can start building our components. Go to the nav.tsx file. Our navbar will bre responsible for display and for
opening and closing our library of music. to create this element, we will use a React functional component. First, we
will need to determine what information this component needs. We do not want to give it too much access to our
application as this leads to inefficiency, but it also must be able to fulfill its purpose. Recall that we created a
part of state to track our library. Our nav component will need access to that part of state, so we will pass that in
props. To do this, we first need to create a type to inform typescript about what parameters our function will take.
Going back to our types.ts file, we will create a new type.

export type NavProps = {
    isLibraryOpen: boolean,
    setLibraryOpen: (open: boolean) => void
}
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This is a type with two parameters, the first is a normal boolean, the second indicates that it is a method which takes
in a boolean input, and returns void

Back in our Nav.tsx file, we can now create this component.

const Nav = ({ isLibraryOpen, setLibraryOpen }: NavProps) => {
    return (

    )
}
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This creates our functional component which can return some babel style tsx code.

Inside the return, we will put what content we want in the navbar. In our case, a name, and a button to open and close
the library.

<nav>
    <h1>Rishik Music Player</h1>
    <button onClick={() => setLibraryOpen(!isLibraryOpen)}>
        Library
    </button>
</nav>
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The button toggles the boolean in the state to open and close the library. Finally, we export default Nav at the end
of the file so we can use this component in other places.

In the App.tsx file, we can now add this component.

Just like we did in our nav component, we will also have a return here. In our return, we will create a div to store our
components, and then we will add our Nav component.

return (
    <div>
        <Nav isLibraryOpen={isLibraryOpen} setLibraryOpen={setIsLibraryOpen}/>
    </div>
)
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While we're here, lets also add our audio into the application. Inside this div, lets create an audio tag which will
implement the handlers we created for it.

<audio onTimeUpdate={timeUpdateHandler} onLoadedMetadata={timeUpdateHandler}
       onEnded={songEndHandler} src={currentSong.audio}/>
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We will also need to use reference this audio in order to use it within our application. To do this, we will use
the useRef hook within react.

const audioRef = useRef<HTMLAudioElement>(null!);
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To link this with the audio tag, we will add a html attribute ref={audioRef} on the audio tag.

We will do the Song similarly to the Nav component. We will determine what data it needs to take in, we will create a
type for those props, then we will create and export the component. For the song, all it needs to know is which song is
currently playing, so it can display the information.

We create the type for the props

export type SongProps = {
    currSong: SongModel
}
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Then create the component

const Song = ({ currSong }: SongProps) => {
    return (
        <div className={"song-container"}>
            <img src={currSong.cover} alt={"album cover"}/>
            <h2>{currSong.name}</h2>
            <h3>{currSong.artist}</h3>
        </div>
    );
};
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For the LibrarySong, we will need to add some more logic to set the current song when we select it in the library. We
will create another method to use the state mutator. Setting the current song is something we will do quite often, so we
can create a file with reusable methods.

Create a file called util.ts and let's create a function to set an active song. To do this, we will need to get the
selected song and set it to be active, and get all other songs and make sure they are inactive to ensure that we do not
have concurrent audio streams. Finally, we will update the songs state with this new information.

export function setCurrentSongActive(song: SongModel, songs: SongModel[], setSongs: Function): void {
    const newSongs = songs.map(s => {
        if (s.id === song.id) {
            return {
                ...s,
                active: true,
            };
        } else {
            return {
                ...s,
                active: false
            };
        }
    });
    setSongs(newSongs);
}
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We can now use this to select a song from the library.

const songSelectHandler = async () => {
    await setCurrentSong(song);

    setCurrentSongActive(song, songs, setSongs);
    if (isPlaying) {
        await audioRef.play();
    }
}
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This async handler will set the current song part of the state, and then it will set the selected song as active and
play it if the previous song was also playing.

Now we can create the type and component

export type LibrarySongProps = {
    song: SongModel,
    songs: SongModel[],
    setCurrentSong: (song: SongModel) => void,
    audioRef: HTMLAudioElement,
    isPlaying: boolean,
    setSongs: (songs: SongModel[]) => void
}
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return (
    <div onClick={songSelectHandler}>
        <img src={song.cover} alt={"album cover"}/>
        <div className={"song-description"}>
            <h3>{song.name}</h3>
            <h4>{song.artist}</h4>
        </div>
    </div>
);
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Now, when we click on a song in our library, it will become selected and active. Now, lets create the library. The
library will need to display all the Library songs which we will map. We will have the props type and the component.

export type LibraryProps = {
    songs: SongModel[],
    setCurrentSong: (song: SongModel) => void,
    audioRef: HTMLAudioElement,
    isPlaying: boolean,
    setSongs: (songs: SongModel[]) => void,
    isLibraryOpen: boolean,
}
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const Library = ({ songs, setCurrentSong, audioRef, isPlaying, setSongs, isLibraryOpen }: LibraryProps) => {
    return (
        <div>
            <h2>Library</h2>
            <div>
                {songs.map(song => <LibrarySong song={song} setCurrentSong={setCurrentSong} songs={songs} key={song.id}
                                                audioRef={audioRef} isPlaying={isPlaying} setSongs={setSongs}/>)}
            </div>
        </div>
    );
};
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Our final component is the player. The player will have the most logic of all our components. First we need to set a
song as active from the library if we select it in the player using our next or previous buttons.

const activeLibraryHandler = (nextPrev: SongModel) => {
    const newSongs = songs.map(s => {
        if (s.id === nextPrev.id) {
            return {
                ...s,
                active: true,
            };
        } else {
            return {
                ...s,
                active: false
            };
        }
    });
    setSongs(newSongs);
};
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Now we need a handler to play a song. With our isPlaying state, this is relatively easy.

const playSongHandler = () => {
    if (isPlaying) {
        audioRef.pause();
        setIsPlaying(!isPlaying);
    } else {
        setIsPlaying(!isPlaying);
        audioRef.play();
    }
};
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Next we need to skip. We can combine forwards and backwards into one function using a switch statement. We will also
need to handle wrapping when we reach the end or beginning of our library. To do this, we can use our currentSong state
along with our activeLibraryHandler we created earlier.

const skipTrackHandler = async (skipDirection: string) => {
    let currIndex = songs.findIndex(song => song.id === currSong.id);
    switch (skipDirection) {
        case 'skip-back':
            if (currIndex === 0) {
                await setCurrentSong(songs[songs.length - 1]);
                activeLibraryHandler(songs[songs.length - 1]);
                break;
            }
            await setCurrentSong(songs[--currIndex]);
            activeLibraryHandler(songs[--currIndex]);
            break;
        default:
            await setCurrentSong(songs[(currIndex + 1) % songs.length]);
            activeLibraryHandler(songs[(currIndex + 1) % songs.length]);
            break;
    }
    if (isPlaying)
        await audioRef.play();
};
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Finally, we must handle the seeking feature. To start, we need to handle the dragging on the progress bar.

const dragHandler = (event: any) => {
    audioRef.currentTime = event.target.value;
    setSongInfo({ ...songInfo, currentTime: event.target.value });
};
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Then, we need to format the time for display

const getTime = (time: number): string => {
    return (
        Math.floor(time / 60) + ":" + ("0" + Math.floor(time % 60)).slice(-2)
    );
};
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This takes the time of the song and formats it in the format mm:ss

Finally, we need to fill the progress bar depending on how time has elapsed in the song.

const trackAnimation = {
    transform: `translateX(${songInfo.animationPercent}%)`
};
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Now we can return the jsx code to display our player controls.

return (
    <div className={"player"}>
        <div className={"time-control"}>
            <p>{getTime(songInfo.currentTime)}</p>
            <div className={"track"}
                 style={{ background: `linear-gradient(to right, ${currSong.color[0]}, ${currSong.color[1]}` }}>
                <input min={0} max={songInfo.duration || 0} value={songInfo.currentTime} type={"range"}
                       onChange={dragHandler}/>
                <div className={"animate-track"} style={trackAnimation}/>
            </div>
            <p>{songInfo.duration ? getTime(songInfo.duration) : "0:00"}</p>
        </div>
        <div className={"play-control"}>
            <FontAwesomeIcon icon={faAngleLeft} className={"back"} size={"2x"}
                             onClick={() => skipTrackHandler('skip-back')}/>
            <FontAwesomeIcon icon={isPlaying ? faPause : faPlay} className={"play"} size={"2x"}
                             onClick={playSongHandler}/>
            <FontAwesomeIcon icon={faAngleRight} className={"forward"} size={"2x"}
                             onClick={() => skipTrackHandler('skip-forward')}/>
        </div>
    </div>
);
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This logic displays the progress bar, the play/pause button depending on whether the song is currently playing, and the
skip buttons. These icons are from the FontAwesome npm package.

Now we can finally put this all together and start the styling. In our App.tsx file, we can add our final components
and pass in their props.

return (
    <div>
        <Nav isLibraryOpen={isLibraryOpen} setLibraryOpen={setIsLibraryOpen}/>
        <Song currSong={currentSong}/>
        <Player isPlaying={isPlaying} setIsPlaying={setIsPlaying} currSong={currentSong} audioRef={audioRef.current}
                songInfo={songInfo} setSongInfo={setSongInfo} songs={songs} setCurrentSong={setCurrentSong}
                setSongs={setSongs}/>
        <Library songs={songs} setCurrentSong={setCurrentSong} audioRef={audioRef.current} isPlaying={isPlaying}
                 setSongs={setSongs} isLibraryOpen={isLibraryOpen}/>
        <audio onTimeUpdate={timeUpdateHandler} ref={audioRef} onLoadedMetadata={timeUpdateHandler}
               onEnded={songEndHandler} src={currentSong.audio}/>
    </div>
);
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Styling

Now we can start styling our components.

Let's start by styling the main App.tsx file with our App.scss file. In our App.tsx file, we need to add classes
to our wrapping div to add in transitions and to change our main layout if the library is open. In the div, we add the
attribute
className={`App ${isLibraryOpen ? 'library-active' : ""}`} and in the app.scss file, we will add some styling
for these classes.

.App {
  transition: all 0.5s ease;
}

.library-active {
  margin-left: 30%;
}
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And now, we can add styling for some general types in our entire project.

* {
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
  box-sizing: border-box;
}

h1, h2, h3 {
  color: rgb(54, 54, 54);
}

body {
  font-family: "Amatic SC", cursive;
}

h3, h4 {
  font-weight: 400;
  color: rgb(100, 100, 100);
}

@import "./song";
@import "./player";
@import "./library";
@import "./nav";

@import url('https://fonts.googleapis.com/css2?family=Amatic+SC:wght@400;700&display=swap');
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The final line of code allows for this project to import a non-standard font from Google Fonts. The other import
statements allow for us to pass our global styling into the other stylesheets.

Let's style library next. Similarly to the previous file, we will need to add classed depending on whether the library
is open or not. We do this with the attribute className={`library ${isLibraryOpen ? 'active-library': ""}`} on the
wrapping div. Now in our library.scss file,

.library {
  position: fixed;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  width: 20rem;
  height: 100%;
  background: white;
  box-shadow: 2px 2px 50px #a2a2a2;
  overflow: scroll;
  transform: translateX(-100%);
  transition: all 0.5s ease;
  opacity: 0;

  h2 {
    padding: 2rem;
  }
}

.library-song {
  display: flex;
  align-items: center;
  padding: 1rem 2rem 1rem 2rem;
  cursor: pointer;
  transition: background 0.5s ease;

  img {
    width: 30%;
  }

  &:hover {
    background: gainsboro;
  }
}

.song-description {
  padding-left: 1rem;

  h3 {
    font-size: 2rem;
  }

  h4 {
    font-size: 1rem;
  }
}

.selected {
  background: #aeadad;
}

.active-library {
  transform: translateX(0%);
  opacity: 1;
}

* {
  scrollbar-width: thin;
  scrollbar-color: rgba(155, 155, 155, 0.5) transparent;
}

*::-webkit-scrollbar {
  width: 5px;
}

*::-webkit-scrollbar-track {
  background: transparent;
}

*::-webkit-scrollbar-thumb {
  background-color: rgba(155, 155, 155, 0.5);
  border-radius: 20px;
  border: transparent;
}

@media screen and (max-width: 768px) {
  .library {
    width: 100%;
  }
}
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This stylesheet styles the library component and the scrollbar for both Chromium and Mozilla browsers. Additionally, on
mobile devices, the library's size is rescaled.

Next we style our navbar,

nav {
  min-height: 10vh;
  display: flex;
  justify-content: space-around;
  align-items: center;

  button {
    background: transparent;
    cursor: pointer;
    border: 2px solid rgb(65, 65, 65);
    padding: 0.5rem;
    transition: all 0.3s ease;

    &:hover {
      background: rgb(65, 65, 65);
      color: white;
    }
  }
}


@media screen and (max-width: 768px) {
  nav {
    button {
      z-index: 10;
    }
  }
}
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This styles the navbar and rescales the UI on mobile devices.

Similarly, we need to style the player:

.player {
  min-height: 20vh;
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
  align-items: center;
  justify-content: space-between;
}

.time-control {
  width: 50%;
  display: flex;

  input {
    width: 100%;
    -webkit-appearance: none;
    -moz-appearance: none;
    background: transparent;
    cursor: pointer;
  }

  p {
    padding: 1rem;
  }
}

.play-control {
  display: flex;
  justify-content: space-between;
  align-items: center;
  padding: 1rem;
  width: 30%;

  svg {
    cursor: pointer;
  }
}

p {
  font-size: 1.5rem;
}

input[type="range"]:focus {
  outline: none;
}

input[type="range"]::-webkit-slider-thumb {
  -webkit-appearance: none;
  height: 16px;
  width: 16px;
  background: black;
}

input[type="range"]::-moz-range-thumb {
  -moz-appearance: none;
  height: 16px;
  width: 16px;
  background: transparent;
  border: transparent;
}

.track {
  background: lightblue;
  width: 100%;
  height: 1rem;
  position: relative;
  border-radius: 1rem;
  overflow: hidden;
}

.animate-track {
  background: rgb(204, 204, 204);
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  transform: translateX(0%);
  pointer-events: none;
}

@media screen and (max-width: 768px) {
  .time-control {
    width: 90%;
  }

  .play-control {
    width: 70%;
  }
}
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This styles the progress bar on both Chromium and Mozilla browsers.

Finally, we need to style the song component,

.song-container {
  min-height: 60vh;
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
  align-items: center;
  justify-content: center;

  img {
    width: 20%;
    border-radius: 50%;
  }

  h2 {
    padding: 3rem 1rem 1rem 1rem;
    font-size: 3rem;
  }

  h3 {
    font-size: 2rem;
  }
}

@media screen and (max-width: 768px) {
  .song-container {
    img {
      width: 60%;
    }
  }
}
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Serverless Function

Now we can get started on the creation of our http trigger to deliver our song data to our application. First, we must
create a standard Http Trigger using the Azure extension in Visual Studio Code. After we get the starter files, open
the index.js file.

As an example I will provide a sample array of music that we can use for this tutorial. If you wish, you may provide any
music you choose that meets the same format.

const songData = [
    {
        name: "Beaver Creek",
        cover:
            "https://chillhop.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/0255e8b8c74c90d4a27c594b3452b2daafae608d-1024x1024.jpg",
        artist: "Aso, Middle School, Aviino",
        audio: "https://mp3.chillhop.com/serve.php/?mp3=10075",
        color: ["#205950", "#2ab3bf"],
        id: uuidv4(),
        active: false,
    },
    {
        name: "Daylight",
        cover:
            "https://chillhop.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/ef95e219a44869318b7806e9f0f794a1f9c451e4-1024x1024.jpg",
        artist: "Aiguille",
        audio: "https://mp3.chillhop.com/serve.php/?mp3=9272",
        color: ["#EF8EA9", "#ab417f"],
        id: uuidv4(),
        active: false,
    },
];
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Insert this song array into the module.exports section of the file. We will also need to import the uuid package to
assign ids to our songs. Finally, the function should end with the context.res section. Inside that section, we must
pass the songData as a part of the request.

context.res = {
    body: songData
};
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This makes the body of the request include the songData array we provided.

Consuming the API call

Finally, we must put these parts together to get the songs within our application.

To do this, we must create a function to fetch from our endpoint. This function will check to see whether the data has
already been loaded, if it has not, then we will use the fetch method to return a Promise from the endpoint with the
song data we provided earlier. We then add the songs to the state.

let loaded = false;
const getSongData = async (): Promise<void | SongModel[]> => {
    if (loaded) return;
    return await fetch("url")
        .then(res => {
            return res.json() as Promise<SongModel[]>;
        })
        .then(res => {
            setSongs(res);
            loaded = true;
        });
};
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However, we will still need to call this function as the page loads. To do this, we can use the useEffect react hook.
The useEffect hook takes in a callback function, and an array of dependencies that the hook watches for. When the
dependencies update, the hook will fire. In the callback function, we need to get the data, and then we need to set the
currentSong.

useEffect(() => {
    if (!loaded) {
        getSongData();
        setCurrentSong(songs[0]);
    }
}, [loaded]);
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My hope with this project is that if it gets deployed, it can help develop a love for smaller artists who are not big
enough to get their music on large streaming platforms. To further improve the user experience for this application, I
would like to add a way for a user to add music to the application without hardcoding it into the function. I would also
like to color more components to give the player a unique look for each album that is played.

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