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Discussion on: It's Time to Say Goodbye to Docker

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benwinding profile image
Ben Winding

Docker is very similar to npm, as it's basically a package-manager, and package-hosting-platform.

Monolithic systems seem complex and annoying, but they usually win out as they have an integrated and smooth workflow for developers...

I think npm and Docker are great tools and aren't going away any time soon...

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aghost7 profile image
Jonathan Boudreau

Containerd is probably not going anywhere, but if docker isn't able to find a way to turn a profit I don't think they'll be staying around...

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mendoza profile image
David Mendoza (He/Him)

how does npm profit?

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aghost7 profile image
Jonathan Boudreau

They don't afaik. They got acquired by microsoft, before that they were using investor money to keep the lights up.

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benwinding profile image
Ben Winding

Npm have enterprise plans (private registries and other tools), but I'm not sure if they actually make a profit

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kshcode profile image
SeongHoon Kim

NPM has not only enterprise plan also personal plans.
npmjs.com/products

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aghost7 profile image
Jonathan Boudreau

The fact they have paid plans does not mean they're making a profit. I've never worked at a company which pays for their products - the offering is not worthwhile since you can just use ssh packages.

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kshcode profile image
SeongHoon Kim

company, i had worked at, has been subscribing private plan. they don't want sharing their technique and skills.

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vbjelak profile image
Vladi Beeblebrox

I have so many questions about first two paragraphs... 😕

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benwinding profile image
Ben Winding

Happy to answer any questions, was it unclear?

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xac0 profile image
Xacobe

A package manager or package-management system is a collection of software tools that automates the process of installing, upgrading, configuring, and removing computer programs for a computer's operating system in a consistent manner.[1]

A package manager deals with packages, distributions of software and data in archive files. Packages contain metadata, such as the software's name, description of its purpose, version number, vendor, checksum (preferably a cryptographic hash function), and a list of dependencies necessary for the software to run properly.

Dependencies... install in OS... hmmmm