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Anita Olsen*°•.☆
Anita Olsen*°•.☆

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Are Certificates From Code-Learning Websites Worth Anything?

I have received some certificates from code-learning sites like Sololearn, Codecademy and may eventually get some from W3Schools as well, but is there anything to them?

The code-learning sites tell us that we can upload them to our LinkedIn, but do such certificates hold any type of esteem in a professional setting in your experience? Are they worth uploading to LinkedIn?

Would you say certificates from code-learning websites are worth anything?

Top comments (13)

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ben profile image
Ben Halpern

They can be part of the story you tell about yourself, but depending on the reputation of the source, they could be a negative signal (which is silly because you're not learning in just one place).

Try to put yourself in the shoes of an evaluator who is going to put a lot of kneejerk bias into the process. MIT is worth more than Codecademy, but by how much and should you put both?

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anitaolsen profile image
Anita Olsen*°•.☆

Thank you SO much for your comment, I highly appreciate it! 🙂

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darkterminal profile image
Imam Ali Mustofa

I like this take!

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darkwiiplayer profile image
𒎏Wii 🏳️‍⚧️

I don't think these certificates tell a potential employer a whole lot; they don't say much about how you work, how quickly you can get things done, how easily you can adapt, etc.

What they can offer though, is quickly show that you pass at least a minimum standard and aren't just pretending to know things when you can't even open a code editor without a manual.

As a purely personal note, I'd be more interested in reading what someone thinks of a certificate: Did they just absorb everything like a sponge, or are they already skilled enough to have opinions and disagreements with things being asked? Can they formulate specific criticism if they disliked something about the certification process? Are they seeing the bigger picture, or just focusing on getting ceretified and that's it? And so on..

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ben profile image
Ben Halpern

Yeah, good answer.

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phalkmin profile image
Paulo Henrique

If I had a penny every time a coworker gloated about a certification just to ask for help on trivial things later, I would have an unsafe amount of pennies right now.

I believe that at some point they had a true value (like, CERTIFICATE in a global, standard way that the person knows the subject) but over time it turned into a) a pay-to-win way to have your resume shine over your lack of experience or b) turn into trophies like the badges we get on DEV (at least the badges are cool).

Does this mean that I'm against people getting certifications? Obviously not, do what you want. But in the end, if I'm on the hiring side, I will try to find out if you really know what you say you do in a practical way. And, if I'm on the "being hired" side, it will be a huge red flag for the company if you only look at the certifications and where did you get them.

But I may be wrong, usually I am on these matters :P

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anitaolsen profile image
Anita Olsen*°•.☆ • Edited

Thank you for sharing with us. I love the badges so much! 😁

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bbkr profile image
Paweł bbkr Pabian

General rule is that certificates should be appropriate to your current skill level and position you are applying to.

For example imagine someone applies for senior developer and has certificate "OOP programming basics in JS" granted 1 month ago, this is red flag that he may be underskilled. But the same certificate for junior dev is perfectly fine and proves that he actually had contat with specific topic.

The only exception that you should always include are ISO certificates. For example if you want to write car software and did ISO 24089 course - brag about it at any skill level :)

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Randall

I review resumes and do interviews. For entry-level hires, I wouldn't pay any attention to certificates like that. For experienced hires, I might see it as a minor red flag since they should be able to fill the available space with more meaningful material.

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Jenna

Hi,

In my opinion, it depends on several factors, like industry recognition and the job market. I find certificates valuable for learning new topics, but just presenting a certificate doesn't fully showcase your potential. Demonstrating practical examples of what you've learned through projects, sharing your thought process through discussions, and your experiences have a bigger impact on potential employers.

As Ben mentioned, "It can be part of your story about yourself."

It is all about how you use and present it.

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jairclayr profile image
Jairclay Rama BAYITOUKOU

The good point with all the kind of certifications presented, is to already show how commited we are to learn. And for anybody you interact with I think it is a first good point to highlight. So first your commitment is highlighted.

Then comes the point of expertise you get through your training and this is related to the consistency of your training content. All these plateforms do not give you the same credit on a team for some of them just scratch the surface and other goes very deep on it.

And the last one for me will be the practice time you engage to be proficient any field. Whatever the kind of certification you get, working on the topic, striking the keyboard about it will be the better way to really be expert on it.

I myself publish Sololearn certificats on my profile and assume to be a good proof of my commitment on learning

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Zaira

Which code-learning sites recommend?

Thank you in advance.

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anitaolsen profile image
Anita Olsen*°•.☆ • Edited

I recommend W3Schools and Codecademy :)

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