What are some stuff that you wish somebody told you when you started learning Vim?

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Context: I'm forced to use an insanely underpowered laptop for light webdev work (dont ask why). VSCode with a handful of extensions makes the machine cry in pain. I'm considering Vim + Chromium as a test browser (are there any lighter alternatives?), but ya know, I only know the magical :q command.

I'm eager to learn though. Any tips?

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:q!. That's the first thing I wish I had known.

Really, I have a passable understanding of vim. But it is a tough one to get started in.

 

Do you think it is a profitable time investment?

 

Under the constraints you mentioned, it could be worthwhile. However, it seems to me the main problem is being forced to use weak hardware for computationally intensive work. Do what you gotta do, but I would probably try to solve that problem first. Then if you still want to use vim for dev work, go for it!

For me, tools like vim or emacs are non-starters. I like to use tools as lightly as possible. I don't do a lot of customization, so that I don't have to worry about the repeatability of my setup. I will perform minor customizations if they make a significant difference. Otherwise, I will look for a tool that does most of what I need out of the box rather than one I have to build up its functionality around my needs.

Ironically, this is the polar opposite stance I take with the code itself. If given the choice between a framework which ties together 80% of the pieces I need, or libraries where I need to compose together the pieces myself, I will choose the library approach. But with the tools I use to write that code, I had rather not expend the effort to compose the settings I need. I had rather just find a different tool so I can concentrate my mental effort on the code.

 

I'm forced to use an insanely underpowered laptop for light webdev work (dont ask why).

You know, there are companies which provide their developers with adequate working equipment, many of them are even hiring ;) SCNR

I have a printed out vim cheat sheet attached to one of my monitors. Several of them exist - a short Google image search will lead you to them, pick your poison.

 

... You know, there are companies which provide their developers with adequate working equipment, many of them are even hiring ;) SCNR

Oh, it's not a work related thing. My company is taking care of me well :D Just a weird, random circumstance that I have to work around.

Anyway, I found this wallpaper that works well with my almost see-through ZShell setup!

 

Try and think of Vim as a language and the commands have some grammatical structure to them. I can't explain this and do this justice, but here's where I first heard this. Source: thoughtbot

 

If you need a lighter test browser there's always lynx...

vim-adventures is a good starting point for learning how to use vim. Once you've got a feel for it, look for extensions -- there are many that do everything from showing git hints in the gutter (added & modified lines) to integrating fuzzy finders. Other people's vimrcs can be good learning resources too.

 

vimtutor, a series of lessons to help you learn the vim commands.

The philosophy behind vim. "You spend more time editing text than writing new text"

A lot of the keys in command mode take the first letter of each word if you say what you want to do.

Example: delete a word: daw

 

Read practical vim and mastering vim books. It will be worth your time. You will save a lot of time later on as well.

 

Go with sublime text. That's the advice I got when I said my friend i wanted to learn vim.

Vim is not for beginners. Get over it and learn it later.

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