DEV Community

Cover image for Calculate cache time with ease in PHP
Ajimoti Ibukun
Ajimoti Ibukun

Posted on • Updated on

Calculate cache time with ease in PHP

Introduction

A cache is a collection of duplicate data, where the original data is expensive to fetch or compute (usually in terms of access time) relative to the cache. In PHP, caching is used to minimize page generation time. (credit)

Caching is an important part of programming as it helps reduce the frequency of CPU intensive tasks you have to run on your server, thereby improving performance.

Most PHP frameworks have their individual ways of caching, however, developers still find it difficult to calculate the duration for a cache as it is usually in seconds.

For example, say we want to store a user data for 24 hours:

<?php
$duration = 24 * 60 * 60; // 24 hours

Redis::cache($userData, $duration);
Enter fullscreen mode Exit fullscreen mode

From the snippet above, you would notice that for better readability, we had to set the $duration variable to a break down of the number of hours in seconds. Additionally, we included a comment that explains what the value is.

Seems too tacky for something as basic as calculating time in seconds. What if there was a better way, what if we could replace the above snippet with something like this:

<?php
use Ajimoti\CacheDuration\Duration;

Redis::cache($userData, Duration::twentyFourHours());
Enter fullscreen mode Exit fullscreen mode

This is more readable compared to the previous snippet. We have changed the complex $duration variable value, and replaced it with a better readable method. Additionally, another developer going through the code does not have to worry about calculating the cache duration as the method name is self explanatory.

In this article, I will be talking about a package that provides a readable and fluent way to generate cache durations for your PHP applications.

Installation

The first step is to install the package. You can install the package from composer using the script below:

composer require ajimoti/cache-duration --with-all-dependencies
Enter fullscreen mode Exit fullscreen mode

After installation, import the Duration trait inside your class, then you are set.

<?php
require 'vendor/autoload.php';

use Ajimoti\CacheDuration\Duration;

var_dump(Duration::fourtyMinutes()); // returns 2400;
var_dump(Duration::tenHours()); // returns 36000;
var_dump(Duration::fiftyFourDays()); // returns 4665600;
Enter fullscreen mode Exit fullscreen mode

The Duration trait provides a fluent way to generate cache durations. In order to achieve this, make a static call of a number in words (must be in camelCase), followed by the time unit (either Seconds, Minutes, Hours or Days).

How it works

The Duration trait uses PHP __callStatic() magic method to allow you make dynamic calls.

For example, you want to get the number of seconds in 37 days, you can achieve this by calling a camel case text of the number in words (thirtySeven in this case), followed by the unit in title case (Days in this case).

That should leave us with something like this:

<?php

Duration::thirtySevenDays(); // returns the number of seconds in 37 days
Enter fullscreen mode Exit fullscreen mode

Note: The number in words MUST be in camel case. Any other case will throw an InvalidArgumentException. Additionally, it must be followed by the unit in title-case. The available units are Seconds, Minutes, Hours, and Days.

Other Available Methods

In addition to this, the following methods are made available for use:

seconds($value)

Get duration in seconds. It basically returns the same value passed into it.

<?php
use Ajimoti\CacheDuration\Duration;

$cacheDuration = Duration::seconds(30); // returns 30

// or dynamically
$cacheDuration = Duration::thirtySeconds(); // returns 30
Enter fullscreen mode Exit fullscreen mode

minutes($value)

Converts time in minutes into seconds.

<?php
use Ajimoti\CacheDuration\Duration;

$cacheDuration = Duration::minutes(55); // returns 55 minutes in seconds (55 * 60)

// or dynamically
$cacheDuration = Duration::fiftyFiveMinutes(); // returns 55 minutes in seconds (55 * 60)
Enter fullscreen mode Exit fullscreen mode

hours($value)

Converts time in hours into seconds.

<?php
use Ajimoti\CacheDuration\Duration;

$cacheDuration = Duration::hours(7); // returns 7 hours in seconds (7 * 60 * 60)

// or dynamically
$cacheDuration = Duration::sevenHours(); // returns 7 hours in seconds (7 * 60 * 60)
Enter fullscreen mode Exit fullscreen mode

days($value)

Converts time in days into seconds.

<?php
use Ajimoti\CacheDuration\Duration;

$cacheDuration = Duration::days(22); // returns 22 days in seconds (22 * 24 * 60 * 60)

// or dynamically
$cacheDuration = Duration::twentyTwoDays(); // returns 22 days in seconds (22 * 24 * 60 * 60)
Enter fullscreen mode Exit fullscreen mode

at($value)

This method allows you to convert a Carbon\Carbon instance, DateTime instance or string of date into seconds.

It returns the difference in seconds between the argument passed and the current timestamp.

The date passed into this method MUST be a date in the future. Similarly, when a string is passed, the text MUST be compatible with Carbon::parse() method, else an exception will be thrown

Examples

<?php
use Date;
use Carbon\Carbon;
use Ajimoti\CacheDuration\Duration;

// Carbon instance
$cacheDuration = Duration::at(Carbon::now()->addMonths(3)); // returns time in seconds between the present timestamp and three months time

// Datetime instance
$cacheDuration = Duration::at(new DateTime('2039-09-30')); // returns time in seconds between the present timestamp and the date passed (2039-09-30).

// String
$cacheDuration = Duration::at('first day of January 2023'); // returns time in seconds between the present timestamp and the first of January 2023.
Enter fullscreen mode Exit fullscreen mode

And that's it

If you find this useful, feel free to star ⭐️ or fork the repository .

Thanks for reading.

Discussion (0)