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Cover image for Wired networks are dead. Long live wired networks

Wired networks are dead. Long live wired networks

_garybell profile image Gary Bell ・2 min read

We are always on the move. Mobile working and, especially with COVID-19 keeping us all locked in, probably working at anything resembling a table in our homes so we can have a change of scenery. With that comes an obvious problem, connectivity. Fortunately, there's data roaming and wireless networking for that. But how good are our wireless access points?

I've just changed broadband providers, and have a ridiculous fast connection, but was seeing absolute garbage speeds (for the actual connection uplink) via wireless. I was connected to a 300Mbps wireless access point, but barely getting 70Mbps. After some digging around I found it's because the access point ethernet interface is only 100Mbps, and it wasn't in a great signal area for repeating the signal.

I've also got a device (Sky Q box) which keeps disconnecting from the main router, despite being only 5m from it. It wasn't a problem with my previous router (which was a Sky device). Absolute nightmare.

My solution, lots of Cat6 cable. If I'm going to want gigabit speeds, or even > 100Mbps, then I need it cabling.

I've now got a 30m cable connecting my desktop gigabit switch to the router. I've just made the cables to cable up the TV, Sky Q box, and the Playstation. Hopefully I can then benefit from great speeds on all of my devices.

Adding the cables to the Sky Q box will then mean I can change the wireless network in the house to use the 5GHz spectrum, rather than the 2.4GHz it's stuck at, because Sky Q won't receive signal at 5GHz, it will only emit at that to other boxes.

Technology is great, and wireless may be (generally) tidier. But when you need performance, you can't (yet) beat cabled networks.


Photo credit: Jordan Harrison on Unsplash

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