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Feels like I am slow at programming. What do you suggested to improve that?

9syncopation profile image 9Syncopation ・1 min read

After career transition from engineering to webdev(bootcamp a year ego) , I feel that I am the slowest developer ever! I volunteer at an open source and working on personal projects and Everything takes me alot of time, adding a widget or a small feature can consume me 5-7hours, its very frustrating.
How can i improve it?
How to evaluate myself for timelines?
what do you suggest for me?

Discussion (7)

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cmuralisree profile image
Chittoji Murali Sree Krishna • Edited

First thing don't think you are slow

just try practicing it more often try new ways, everyone can't be einstien or sundar pichai,
just it takes time at the begining, no one striaght up become a professional,

at the start i use take a day for creating a simple web project, but my batchmates they might be doing it hours bcz it depends on there learning curve and grip on the language,

but i kept practicing by creating a new projects day by day, now i can definately outrate my batchmates in web-dev,

if you think you are slow then you are in a wrong learning curve, or you might be new to that language

try improving a better learning curve, learn the shortcuts in it, don't just keep stick with basics

for example:

basic way of writing function in html

<body>
<p onclick="myFunction()">Click me</p>
<script>
myFunction(){
document.body.style.backgroundColor = "red";
}
</script>
</body>

Enter fullscreen mode Exit fullscreen mode

the other way is arrow function

<body>
<p id="demo">Click me.</p>

<script>
document.getElementById("demo").addEventListener("click",  ()=>{
document.body.style.backgroundColor = "red";
});
</script>
</body>
Enter fullscreen mode Exit fullscreen mode

both the methods have there own pros and cons, but one is faster than other it depends on your way of learning

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igorfil profile image
Igor Fil

Slow but steady wins the race ;)

In the long run, it is much more beneficial if you take it slow now, learn all the things and understand profoundly how they work, rather than just racing through tasks. In the long run, that accumulated knowledge and skills will pay off big time. I wish I personally realized that 5-7 years ago :)

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epsi profile image
E.R. Nurwijayadi

My background is mechanical engineering.

It is a good start for data science. I learn about 18 programming languages since last december. It also take hours for each language.

the thing is the more I invest my time, the more I get understanding about each differences. SO I guess time does not matter. The deep understanding does matter.

After a while the scary thing such as generics concept, and concurreny become something fun. Now I cannot stop learning.,

I should spent my time on the concept, instead of coding. And I really have fun with this learning journey.

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kr428 profile image
Kristian R.

Any idea what exactly slows you down in that? Personal advice, dumb as it might sound, would be to do some sort of time-tracking to figure out what you spend your hours on exactly: Improper tooling? Loads of reading due to lack of knowledge? Understanding the problem to fix (like diving through the architecture of a certain system and understanding where to get started)? Trial-and-error hacking until the code looks and works right?
Depending on what you see, you should decide where to optimize - be that by learning, by getting better tools, ... .

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a3n3d3i profile image
Andi

It may also be the case you are actually not a slow programmer?!
Sometimes it may feel like that because you were used to have certain rhythm or speed at your previews position were you were working at comfortable speed, but once you changed position it may feel like "slow".
A really good way to actually check your speed is to try to do some peer programming with someone either in your same position or your experience.
In the end you may be amassed how similar programmers are :)

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jmccabe profile image
John McCabe

Practice, and recognising that 'speed' needs to take into account 'thoroughness'. If you consider yourself 'slow' but, when you add features, they are complete, fully thought through, tested and reliable, that's better than fast and slap-dash since the latter will, ultimately, take time to fix.

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hassan_k_a profile image
.

practice, practice and practice even more. being slow is natural don't worry every thing will improve with time. the most important thing is never give up and continue the hard work.

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