DEV Community

loading...

Is it okay if I publish the post I write here, to the medium.com too?

3sanket3 profile image Sanket Patel ・1 min read

Obviously with back-link to dev.to.

I would also love to know, what you prefer to reach out to more people as developers are spread-ed across many platforms.

Thanks!

Discussion

pic
Editor guide
Collapse
sublimegeek profile image
Jonathan Irvin

In my experience, the group at dev.to has been much more welcoming than Medium.

Collapse
joehobot profile image
Joe Hobot

Because Medium is not same?

Medium = Everything about Anything from Anywhone
Dev = Dev/Ops = "a.k.a Geeks"

Collapse
sublimegeek profile image
Jonathan Irvin

Medium isn't the same as DEV. It's more of a general audience. DEV is more niche.

Thread Thread
pojntfx profile image
Felix Pojtinger

DEV is FLOSS as well, whereas Medium is proprietary!

Collapse
3sanket3 profile image
Sanket Patel Author

Yes it is. That's why want to keep this as a original source. And feeling really fortunate to have such an awesome community. But I was just thinking to give a try there as well to know thoughts from the people who are not here.

Thanks

Collapse
itsdarrylnorris profile image
Darryl Norris

Re-posting articles should be ok. As long you use the Canonical URL.

Dev.to and Medium both support Canonical URL.

Collapse
ferricoxide profile image
Thomas H Jones II

A few years back (2011?), there used to be great multi-poster service. With it, you'd select a "cardinal" blog-site and duplicate-to blog-sites. You'd write your articles on the "cardinal" site, then the service would see the new post and replicate it out to your duplicate-to sites. At the time, I had Blogger as my cardinal site with Tumblr, WordPress and three or four others as duplicate-tos.

I wasn't so much doing it to ensure visibility to other developers (I assume that few people find my stuff relevant since it often seems I'm writing about corner-cases) but as a way to help myself cope with our corporate content-filters at the time. See, I mostly blog for my own needs — they act as a repository of "lessons learned" that I can re-reference as needed (avoiding the whole "dead links" and "different results to the same query" problem that comes with using Google over time). Problem was, dealing with our corporate web-filter was kinda like whack-a-mole: any given week, a different blogging platform would be black-listed. Having content-dupes meant I could usually find a least one copy that was reachable from work.

Sadly, that formerly free product became a for-fee service. Don't even remember its name, any more, or whether it's still around.