re: If I don't use React, am I still a developer? VIEW POST

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I feel that this is old article is also related: blog.codinghorror.com/the-magpie-d...

However over the course of my professional carreer (almost 14 years now) I do feel that the industry is sort of... settling. Slowly. Oh, it's still pretty much in turmoil and new ideas and frameworks still appear on a regular basis, but at the same time... some concepts, principles and ideas seem to have coalesced. They've been mulled around, variations have been tried, best practices have been found and are now accepted as the Right Way by almost everyone. And they've stopped changing. There's an implementation or five in most popular languages that vary mainly by method names and no others are being created, because there's just no point.

In backed this would be, for example, the areas of ORMs and Loggers. Take a bunch of active libraries and compare them. The differences are mainly in small details and naming, but the core concepts and patterns are the same. There's no big innovation left there because we've already reached a state where they're good enough for all practical purposes. In a similar way, GIT has won the source-control wars.

And I wonder if the same is happening in the front-end world? That's not an area I'm deeply familiar with, but from the sidelines it also seems like there is a sort of settling. We have React and Vue which are based on the same ideas and everyone seems to be happy with them. There hasn't been a major paradigm upheaval for years now.

Nobody can predict the future, of course, but I think that if you wish to go along the front-end route, then picking up React/Vue would probably be a good investment of time, likely serving you for years to come - if not the rest of your life.

In other words - even if you have fallen a bit behind the times, I think that catching up is easier than it seems. :)

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