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Discussion on: Is ESLint Worth Your time?

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Tirtha Guha

For small projects you can avoid linting. But for large ecosystems, like 50+ devs working with 1.5 million lines of code, we need some consistency to ease development, debugging and review. I'm absolutely for linting.

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Kaleb M Author

I'd love to hear more on your reasoning for this?

I find that smaller teams have to handle larger responsibilities, meaning more of the code base (percentage wise), even though less of them are actually writing it.

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s3pt1c4n profile image
Richard Pap

I don't think it would be about just the size on the team. When you lead a team of junior devs for example, it's also a really useful thing to teach them.

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Tirtha Guha

Consistency is the keyword here. Random coding styles makes difficult to support code. Every class or file would start to have different styles, and that would make debugging a nightmare. Instead, enforce a consistent coding style and make everyone's life easy.

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Kaleb M Author

Yes I would agree - wouldn't a linter help with that consistent style for small and large teams?

I was trying to understand the difference between the two from your perspective, as I've only worked on smaller web applications compared to enterprise level imho.

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Kaleb M Author

Agreed! Especially if you use a config like Airbnb's which is strict :D