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Discussion on: 🙏 Please Add .gitattributes To Your Git Repository

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tiguchi profile image
Thomas Iguchi

There's also an option that makes everyone happy: Let the git installation on a user's machine decide which line ending to use when a repository is checked out:

* text=auto
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That way it really doesn't matter and Windows users can still open their files using Notepad if they wish (I'm not judging 😄).

AFAIK line endings are committed to the repository "normalized" as LF, but the checked out version depends on the OS default for line endings.

The setting can be also fine tuned with additional overrides in case there are specific file types that need their line endings preserved (e.g. shell scripts or Windows batch files)

See also: help.github.com/en/github/using-gi... and git-scm.com/docs/gitattributes

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doctorderek profile image
Dr. Derek Austin 🥳

This doesn't work because if you have ESLint set to error then (like to error on Prettier) than Windows developers will get CRLF endings with errors on every line. They'll have to "eslint . --fix" and make a fake commit to fix the problem.

  • text=auto can't be the solution, since it's the default...
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tiguchi profile image
Thomas Iguchi

I think your remark misses the point I was originally trying to make, which is to give developers the freedom to use whatever line ending they want to use on their development platform.

Enforcing \n via ESlint rule defies that purpose, so why did you set up your project with that .gitattributes rule?

Also why don't you just disable that line ending ESlint rule since it's safe to assume that the line endings are always correct on the platform where you check out and build your project. There is no point in checking for \n line endings using that .gitattributes setting.

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doctorderek profile image
Dr. Derek Austin 🥳

Hey Thomas! Thanks for your thoughtful reply.

I agree 100% that the ESLint line ending rule is pointless and dumb. But I find that a ton of open source projects enforce it, while few have .gitattributes files.

So instead of convincing a library to change their ESLint settings, the .gitattributes file (* text eol=lf) absolutely fixes the issue for Windows developers without other changes. For everyone else, it's just pointless.

A common ESLint configuration file errors on prettier/prettier, ala Tailwind: github.com/tailwindlabs/tailwindcs...

{
  "extends": ["prettier"],
  "plugins": ["prettier"],
  "rules": {
    "prettier/prettier": [
      "error",
      {
        "semi": false,
      }
    ]
  }
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If you are using ESLint to enforce Prettier settings, it makes sense. But it will also cause the error. You could fix it by changing the ESLint rule, because it's pointless, but it's easier to add .gitattributes instead, I think.

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doctorderek profile image
Dr. Derek Austin 🥳

To put it another way, you'd never accept a contribution from a Windows contributor using Notepad in the first place, because they can't use Prettier. (OK, they could run Prettier and ESLint manually, but it's just not a realistic development environment.) So since you're already enforcing Prettier to the point of erroring on it, then you might as well force them to download the correct line endings when checking out.

ESLint even recommends .gitattributes over changing the ESLint setting from its default eslint.org/docs/rules/linebreak-st...

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deadlybyte profile image
Carl Saunders Author

Thanks for this additional information. Please NO, not Notepad!!! 😀

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rtpharry profile image
Matthew Harris

Haha I moved to macOS at the start of the year and I miss notepad. :P

TextEdit can be configured close but it's not the same.

I also never realised how much I used WIN+R as a quick scratchpad when I found myself distracted by another task but still had something live in my clipboard.

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pclundaahl profile image
Patrick Charles-Lundaahl

Try sublime text!

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ytjohn profile image
YourTech John

Check out Quiver for macOS. Create notes within notebooks, and each note can have cells of markdown, code blocks, or sequence diagrams.

happenapps.com/#quiver

For other platforms, check out Joplin. It's not as nice as quiver, but shares some of the same ideas.

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tiguchi profile image
Thomas Iguchi

I miss that app so much... I switched to Linux from Mac OS a while ago, and that one was one of my most favorite productivity apps.

My crude workaround at the moment is Typora. It's not bad, but not nearly as polished as Quiver.

I will check out Joplin soon. Thanks for the tip!

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xevion profile image
Xevion

Currently using Joplin. It is amazing, and a quick look at Quiver yields a very similar look. I don't know of any implementation that allows "sharing" notebooks like I saw in a screenshot of Quiver, but otherwise, Notebooks with sub-notebook organization, Markdown is possible. Also, there seem to be a lot more methods for accessing Joplin on different platforms, with Windows/MacOS/Linux/Android/iOS/Terminal implementations with DropBox and other file storage services. Highly recommended.
Also, Joplin is FREE. Major bonus.

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aleksandrhovhannisyan profile image
Aleksandr Hovhannisyan • Edited

I admit to still typing notepad into Run/cmd/PS on occasion, but I swear it's only for notes I plan to throw away quickly lol

Literally me, lol!

Windows + R, type notepad, and then dump my thoughts in there from time to time (usually my TODOs for the day). It's good to have such a minimal editor on hand, without all those UI distractions.

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armw4 profile image
Antwan R. Wimberly

Str♎️ Facts!!

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ashu12318 profile image
Ashutosh Singh Parmar

True... notepad is best for temporary things..

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doctorderek profile image
Dr. Derek Austin 🥳

Haha I take meeting notes in Notepad all the time, though I'm often terrified the power will go out lol.

FWIW I changed a file to LF line endings in VS Code and edited it in Notepad without problems...

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Charles Roper

Install Notepad2-mod, choose to replace Notepad when you install it, and you'll get all the lightweight joy of old Notepad with just enough extra sprinkles (like lf support and syntax highlighting) to make it practical.

xhmikosr.github.io/notepad2-mod/

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armw4 profile image
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Hải

I'm a heavy Windows desktop user. But live primarily in wsl terminal nowadays.

Btw, that Regex would match Unux😝

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moopet profile image
Ben Sinclair

Ah, the glory days of Unux and Linix.

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mistval profile image
Randall

As a (mainly) Windows user I always disable autocrlf and standardize on LF because:

  1. If I'm building Docker images (and I often am), I don't want to be copying CR LF files into the Docker images. Some Linux utilities will choke on them.

  2. If my program reads, say, XML files, I don't want the (multiline) strings going through my code to differ depending on my OS, this has bit me before too.

  3. If I calculate a hash on a file I want it to be the same on any OS.

  4. While I have had problems with CR LF files on Linux, I have never had problems with LF files on Windows (I don't use Notepad).

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