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Web devs assemble! Why did you choose a career in web dev? πŸ‘€

Amelia Vieira Rosado
INTJ & knowledge hoarder 🧠 junior techie 🐣 blogging my πŸ’– out @ dev.to & technoglot.com πŸ’» lifelong learner πŸ€“ experimenter πŸ§ͺ anime-lover 😍
・Updated on ・2 min read

Photo by Anas Alshanti on Unsplash

Calling all web devs on here! This is quite urgent...(sort of)

First of all, I hope this post finds you in good health. πŸ‘‹πŸ» Second of all, care to share why you chose a career in web dev? Pretty please! πŸ™‡πŸ»β€β™€οΈ

The reason why I ask this of you on this wonderful day is because I see more web devs out there than any other kind of devs. So I was wondering what, in your personal experience, you find appealing about this career path. If you are not yet working as a web dev, why did you choose to learn about web dev?

Let us have a discussion below. Here are some questions to help you shape your comment:

  • Why did you choose web dev as a career path?
  • What do you find appealing about web dev as opposed to other areas in the tech space?
  • Have you considered moving away from web dev? If yes, why. If no, why not.

Mind you, there are no right or wrong answers here. Just answers.

πŸ‘‡πŸ» Share your thoughts in the comments below! I'll read 'em all! πŸ‘€




Still here? Catch me on Twitter or find me elsewhere! If you like my blogs and are feeling generous, kindly consider to πŸ‘‡πŸ»




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Discussion (21)

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matthewbdaly profile image
Matthew Daly

Web dev is a second career for me. I didn't know what to do after leaving school and began working for a big insurance company. After five years or so I was getting fed up with it.

I had a voucher for a Dummies book cheap, so I got the one on Linux and read that, then tried Ubuntu, which sparked a long-dormant interest in programming. I did a correspondence course on web development and learned Python, Perl and JavaScript, before finally leaving to take up my first role in web dev. Start of September this year will mark ten years in the industry for me and I've never looked back.

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technoglot profile image
Amelia Vieira Rosado Author

Thanks for your input @matthewbdaly 😊 Glad to see things have worked out well for you in this field! By the way, have you considered moving to something outside of web dev? πŸ€” Why or why not?

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matthewbdaly profile image
Matthew Daly

I actually did some mobile development work at my second and third web dev roles, albeit using Phonegap, so using the same technologies I would to build a website. So my experience is a bit wider than average.

I don't really see myself moving out of web dev because I'm not really interested in doing so. I like working with these technologies, and solving these sorts of problems. Working with Phone gap was an interesting diversion but it wasn't that different, and I'm not sure I'd be interested in doing native app development.

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technoglot profile image
Amelia Vieira Rosado Author

I don't really see myself moving out of web dev because I'm not really interested in doing so.

Fair enough. Once again, thanks for taking the time to join the conversation, I appreciate it! 😊

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vonheikemen profile image
Heiker

It felt more accesible. I started learn to code in college (C and C++). At first it was all cool, I just needed to learn algorithms and make CLI tools... but then after a year the assignments require me to build whole apps (sometimes games), you know, things with a GUI and a database. There was no way I could have done anything like that with the knowledge I had at the time. The way I manage to get anything done was learning PHP. With my crappy laptop (that had windows installed), xamp, a text editor and a book (no internet access at the time) I build my first "app."

I stayed in web dev because it was easier to get a job if you knew PHP. I was able to get everything done get the little resources I had at time.

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technoglot profile image
Amelia Vieira Rosado Author

Thanks for joining the conversation @vonheikemen 😁 I believe most people start in web dev because of how accessible (or "easy" to learn) it is, as you mentioned. Now, given that you have more resources, would you still choose to work in web dev? Why or why not? Would love to hear your thoughts on this one 😬

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vonheikemen profile image
Heiker

Good question. I think I like web dev way too much. I really have no interest in other areas of software development. I like the fact that I could build something meaningful to me with just a browser and the free tier of a platform like heroku or netlify.

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rahoulb profile image
Rahoul Baruah

I was a developer using proprietary tech for desktop software but all my investment and knowledge vanished very quickly when the owning company changed focus.

So I switched to open source tools on an open platform.

And even though I look at mobile development every now and then I can’t bring myself to work on a platform with such powerful gatekeepers

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technoglot profile image
Amelia Vieira Rosado Author

Hey @rahoulb , thanks for sharing your thoughts on this one! 😁

So I switched to open source tools on an open platform.

How has this choice affected your career, if at all? πŸ€”

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rahoulb profile image
Rahoul Baruah

Well I’ve built my career around it. Freelance, agency owner, startup founder - all based on that same principle.

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hassan_schroeder profile image
Hassan Schroeder

I got into tech fixing IBM keypunches in 1973 and worked up to mainframes and networking. I discovered the WWW in 1993 while working at Sun Microsystems and realized it was an incredible tool for making information widely available (without shipping CDs around!).

Since then I've worked on pretty much every aspect of web development at some point, and I can definitely say that there's always something new to learn. (I want to play with IoT devices next, but there will always be a web component I'm sure.)

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Amelia Vieira Rosado Author

Thanks for sharing your side of the story @hassan_schroeder ! 😁

I want to play with IoT devices next,

That's a very interesting next step πŸ€”

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dzetah profile image
Stanyslas Bres

I always loved computers/maths/electronics so it was a pretty obvious choice for me to go for a CS path.

At first I was learning about general computer sciences, my first two years were about automation, embedded systems, networking, etc. But we had lessons about web development and I immediately knew that was something I would love more than programming some machines in a factory.

Then I moved to a bachelor about web and mobile development where I truly loved every bit of knowledge I learned (teachers were awesome). I felt I could create awesome and useful apps for a lot of different people and help them simplify everyday tasks.

Then I heard about UI and UX, which was exactly what I loved the most with webdev, making simple, useful and pleasant to use apps. So I followed a master's degree in web development and psychology (basically UX courses).

I never thought about leaving the industry, but hey I just graduated two years ago!

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Amelia Vieira Rosado Author

Hey @dzetah πŸ‘‹πŸ» Thanks for joining the conversation! It seems this is what you are most passionate about and I'd dare say it is your calling! Best of luck in your career moving forward! 😁

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Lucca Prado

When I was a Kid I always saw my Dad working a lot on computer, sometimes I saw overnight, then one day he explained that he was developing an software for an Fuel company. So I always thought "humm, I want to be like him" and finally started to learn and love it.

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juanfrank77 profile image
Juan F Gonzalez

This is one of the cases in which it'd be proper to say "I didn't choose this path, the path chose me."

Long story short, I studied Comp Sci in college, got what's called an "specialization" in software engineering and ultimately left college thinking that networks, databases, and backends are very boring.

Later on, I found about the front side of things and building good-looking and functional UI's became my favorite thing to do in development. Besides, I was the kind of guy to use ASCII for "sprucing up" the terminals when building C programs either as term projects or for homework.

So yeah, web dev and especially UI development, is my thing and I would not change that for any other trending tech (there's enough shiny new syndrome with JS frameworks already 😜)

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technoglot profile image
Amelia Vieira Rosado Author

Thanks for joining the conversation @juanfrank77 ! 😁

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simbiosis profile image
SIMBIOSIS

*Why did you choose web dev as a career path?
That's maybe a tricky question for a tricky answer. I didn't chose it. It chose me. I wanted to build mobile apps but I was really reluctant to start learning a new programming language (Java or Swift or Dart or whatever) if I had no time. Then I discovered hybrid apps and that's all. I am a web dev mainly because I use web technologies to build but mainly apps not web sites.

What do you find appealing about web dev as opposed to other areas in the tech space?

It takes me to the answer to your second question. Maybe web technologies can be used to solve so many problems out of the web itself that many people choose it as a career. Another thing is to consider the wide web growth all over the years and mainly during the two pandemic years of 2020 and 2021.

Have you considered moving away from web dev? If yes, why. If no, why not.

No. I don't think about moving away mainly because I am to old and busy to start with a new language right now.

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Alex Finnarn

A roommate...oddly enough I was looking through my email the other day and found a message to a friend where I lamented trying to get a web dev job for several years but not being able to land one. I worked in non-profit tech roles and had a roommate who ended up jumping from non-profits to a much better web dev job and salary. That was all I needed at the time to quit my job, move in with my parents, and after many months land my first web job...it was a horrible and stressful job living in a hotel 100% of the time, but I needed my first break. This was 2013.

Would I try to get a web dev job now? Probably not for a few reasons...and I suppose I'm disgruntled so take that into account vs. some perfect web dev career path.

  • Bootcamps make it really, really, really hard to get noticed these days. 2013 was before most (if any?) code schools had formed so getting interviews without knowing much was possible. I don't think that's true now....hell, it's not that easy for "senior devs" however you rate that level...
  • Shit changes too often. This really pisses me off...I'm looking at you node/JS...it seems like multiple times a day, I have to update projects with only a few dependencies. Why? Why? Why? Does a carpenter have to buy a new hammer every week? NO, THEY DON'T. GRRRRRR!!!
  • Changing trends causes people to say "Well, it's your fault for sticking with X thing too long, and now I will throw out your resume cause it says PHP on it." Gaining experience in the "wrong tech stack" and doing well can lead you to a dead-end...for doing a good job...how does that make sense? Be careful if you are considered an "expert" in anything because five years later it could somehow look bad.
  • Bigotry. People care about some kinds of diversity but not others. Since I've worked with PHP, people have laughed at me at meetups more than once. It is harder for me to get a job because of these unfounded opinions. Code school instructors perpetuate them, e.g. "PHP is a flaming pile of garbage." says the code school instructor to his class.
  • Ageism. At 35, I'm already too old somehow...I'm met older people and feel bad for them. They are good devs but the industry and hiring is broken.
  • Arbitrary interview tests. The more experienced you get, it's not the case you will do well in interviews. You will need to spend years on LeetCode if you want to pass half the tech interviews...then, if you get hired, you won't need to use the algo/DS knowledge 99% of the time since using an open-source library is usually a better idea. My value-added to the business comes at a way higher abstraction level.

So what should you do?

I wish I was a plumber or some tradesperson. They have unions, seniority, and peace of mind knowing plumbing won't change out from under them. I also hear there are buttload of open jobs. They don't have to answer questions about "brown pipes" :P

jasonbock.net/jb/News/Item/7c33403...

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Amelia Vieira Rosado Author

Oh boy, what a thorough comment! I love it!

Would I try to get a web dev job now? Probably not for a few reasons

Not gonna lie, your reasons are very solid. Most of them are the reason I'm wondering how people end up in web dev and stay there.

Does a carpenter have to buy a new hammer every week? NO, THEY DON'T. GRRRRRR!!!

This one is too real πŸ˜‚

Since I've worked with PHP, people have laughed at me at meetups more than once. It is harder for me to get a job because of these unfounded opinions. Code school instructors perpetuate them, e.g. "PHP is a flaming pile of garbage."

This I find totally unacceptable. What is so funny about a PHP developer? If anything, I'd praise you for that. I can't code in PHP for shit! I just hate how some devs think they are superior to others just because they use a different tech stack. I just can't wrap my head around it. But hey, welcome to the most opinionated industry ever.

They are good devs but the industry and hiring is broken.

Don't get me started on that darn hiring process.

"wrong tech stack"

Whatever that is... Oh, I know: everything that is not JS is the WRONG stack πŸ™„

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akrck02

I started studying web development because I'ts easy to start with and build real products even with basic knowledge.

Once you spent some years there, you learn programming, server, database, UI and UX related concepts so It's a good starting point.

Every development learning is valid, so, what you learn here, it's somehow useful in other development branches.

The most important part is understanding and loving the solving problems, no matter what!

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