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Cover image for A compilation of misconceptions non-tech people have about devs (part 1 of 2) ๐Ÿ˜ž

A compilation of misconceptions non-tech people have about devs (part 1 of 2) ๐Ÿ˜ž

technoglot profile image Amelia Vieira Rosado ใƒปUpdated on ใƒป4 min read

Photo by Ali Saadat on Unsplash

Oh boy, this is gonna be a fun one! ๐Ÿ˜‚ Don't you just HATE it when people throw stereotypes your way or simply assume you have certain "traits" because you work in tech? I know you do, so read on! ๐Ÿ‘€

An unnecessary intro...

Need some background? If not, skip to the next section. If yes; you're in the right place!

So, what inspired this blog? Well, I vaguely remember the time we had a blockchain crash course at the university. Despite that being part of our curriculum (Information and Communication Technology curriculum), a student from the Faculty of Socio-economic Sciences joined us. The first half of the "crash course" was pure theory, so she could follow along. The second part however, was about programming so-called smart contracts (not as fancy as it sounds).

Long story short, at some point she got comfortable around me and a good friend and classmate of mine and said the following: "Wow, you guys sure are a fun bunch! I never thought ICT students were this sociable and friendly!". Mind you, she was being honest. Not an ounce of sarcasm there. Now, I couldn't help but get a bit annoyed. After all, why assume tech students are social misfits based on whatever dumb stereotype?

And so, this marvelous yet disastrous piece was born! Behold, for your eyes have never been blessed in this way before! ๐Ÿคฉ (What the code was that... ๐Ÿ˜‚). Let us dissect some misconceptions! ๐Ÿ”

Author's note: I shall refer to web devs, software engineers and the like as "devs" henceforth. Please bare with me! ๐Ÿ™‡๐Ÿปโ€โ™€๏ธ

Misconception #1: Devs are anti-social beings ๐Ÿ˜’

Well, I already somewhat busted this myth above. Sure, I HAVE met people who have very poor social skills. That does not mean they are anti-social per se, just much less "extroverted and bubbly" than the average. And guess what? That's FINE!

P.S.: I happen to be an introvert myself, but I do my best to flex my social muscles ๐Ÿ’ช๐Ÿป.

Misconception #2: All devs are gamers ๐ŸŽฎ

Bruh button
This one is wrong on so many levels. There's a ton of things we do on computers other than programming. Playing games is one of them, but this is certainly NOT true for everyone in tech. I for once don't feel much for PC games. Heck, wish I had that much time on my hands to even play games. ๐Ÿ™„ I happen to prefer mobile games and usually don't stick to them for too long. So, nope; not all techies are gamers by definition. (Non-gamers, where you at?)

Misconception #3: Devs can solve ANY tech issue ๐Ÿ”จ

Nah
Look, some of us are jacks of all trades, but one thing is for sure; we ain't gods!

Please don't ask me to check your PC for you if it looks like this:
-WRECKED PC PIC-

Know that I have little interest in hardware, and therefore am incompetent when it comes to fixing it! ๐Ÿ˜‚ In all seriousness. Non-techies need to understand our jobs a bit better. Don't ask a data analyst to remove malware from your PC. It ain't up their alley. Long story short: working in tech does not equate to being an omnipotent god that can fix everything. We have our specialized jobs for a reason, so please look into our responsibilities and don't assume we can fix everything tech-related. (We will at least try to turn it off and on again though).

Misconception #4: Devs are all nerds and geeks ๐Ÿค“

Sorry to disappoint but there's the odd ones too. Those that are not geeky, not nerdy and not fond of anime (like I am, for instance ๐Ÿ˜ฌ). Don't assume people's entertainment preferences from their line-of-work. Thanks.

Misconception #5: Devs never dress up ๐Ÿ‘ฉ๐Ÿปโ€๐Ÿ’ผ๐Ÿ‘จ๐Ÿปโ€๐Ÿ’ผ

Have you seen a dev at a wedding? I have not (-never gone to a wedding in her life-). Chances are that, if you did, they weren't wearing hoodies, shorts and some slippers. Some people seem to think that we, devs and engineers and the like, are the least professional-looking and fashionable fellas out there. WRONG. Some of us do enjoy looking sharp at all times. Others prefer to rock more casual outfits.

Bottom-line: we don't need the suit and tie. Bonus bottom-line: yes, presence matters but outfits do not per se denote level of professionalism ๐Ÿ˜‰ (even though we judge people by their appearances. Topic for another time...).

Wrapping up

In order to not kill you of boredom, I will keep it at this. However, do expect a second part on this topic. There's still a lot to unpack!

What are some assumptions non-tech people have made of you? I'm curious to know!

May the source be with you! ๐Ÿ‘ฉ๐Ÿปโ€๐Ÿ’ป๐Ÿ‘จ๐Ÿปโ€๐Ÿ’ป See you next time!




Still here? Catch me on Twitter or find me elsewhere! If you like my blogs and are feeling generous, kindly consider to ๐Ÿ‘‡๐Ÿป




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Discussion (19)

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devlorenzo profile image
DevLorenzo

Another very nice article!
The biggest misconception all my classmates do is, you know how to program, so you're kind of a wizard who can speak to computers using a boring, repetitive, and incompressible kind of language. ๐Ÿ˜’
A lot think that programming it's like 50 years ago, with the computer completely black in the command prompt, a white vertical line that turns on and off, and the computer repeats "command not found". And I must say that the computer science (I mean before a specialized university) and math professors don't help in that.
They don't know what the world of programming really is...

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technoglot profile image
Amelia Vieira Rosado Author

Another very nice article!

Thanks for the kind words @devlorenzo ! Glad you enjoyed this one! ๐Ÿ˜

A lot think that programming it's like 50 years ago, with the computer completely black in the command prompt, a white vertical line that turns on and off, and the computer repeats "command not found".

Thank goodness it is not like that anymore ๐Ÿ˜‚ Maybe it is time that we shine a light on these misconceptions so that others can better understand us and our line of work? ๐Ÿค” What do you think?

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devlorenzo profile image
DevLorenzo

First I think that you know how to turn a comment into a conversation, and it is something I absolutely have to learn for my articles. ๐Ÿ˜‚
In my opinion, to clear these misconceptions we can let time pass, he'll do a big part of things. Those of our age are increasingly realizing the importance of programming. Above all, I see how here in Europe we teach more and more programming. Even if it's not done perfectly (because they basically work on mathematical algorithms, not on actual programming), is already a step forward! ๐Ÿ˜
Then in my opinion there is an accessibility problem, a young person who wants to have fun with programming cannot find himself stuck between basic courses with scratch and a freecodecamp certification. We need an interactive, simple, engaging, and fun way for young people to learn programming. Teaching real programming while always staying interesting and straight to the point.
It's something I wanted to do for my last hackathon, a website to learn programming in a scroll, so on only one page. But I don't know if I ever will.

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technoglot profile image
Amelia Vieira Rosado Author

First I think that you know how to turn a comment into a conversation, and it is something I absolutely have to learn for my articles. ๐Ÿ˜‚

Hehehe, take notes! ๐Ÿ˜‰ The key is to ask questions and pick the commenter's brain.

In my opinion, to clear these misconceptions we can let time pass, he'll do a big part of things.

I believe so too. In my case I just tend to call people out on their BS instead. ๐Ÿ™Š (more like explain that their way of thinking about us makes no sense and that we are all part of the same species. ๐Ÿ˜…)

Above all, I see how here in Europe we teach more and more programming.

Where I live, we are still several lightyears away from such developments. I'm still thinking of ways to make programming more accessible to the young ones (and others, of course). The issue here tends to be that the people are very static and love to live in their comfort zone (even if it means living on a minimum wage).

It's something I wanted to do for my last hackathon, a website to learn programming in a scroll, so on only one page. But I don't know if I ever will.

I'd say don't discard the idea just yet. By the way, I don't know if you have heard of Scrimba before, but I think it is a good example of a site that makes learning quite interactive. They have this feature where you basically pause the video lesson and play with the code directly. Imagine watching a tutorial on YouTube, pausing it and playing with the instructor's code on the spot. That's pretty neat! ๐Ÿ˜œ

Thanks again for sharing your thoughts! Makes for an awesome little conversation ๐Ÿ˜

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darkphantom7750 profile image
Rushan S J

1: I'm am introvert but I still socialize. Definitely not anti-social.
2: I'm a hardcore fortnite and codm gamer. (I started coding after gaming).
3: Not a NERD from any angle.
4: I wear nice dresses. (I like being handsome...)

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technoglot profile image
Amelia Vieira Rosado Author

1: I'm am introvert but I still socialize. Definitely not anti-social.

I can't stand how people somehow come to associate introversion with being anti-social. That never made sense to me ๐Ÿ˜’

Thanks for sharing your thoughts by the way! ๐Ÿ˜

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aarone4 profile image
Aaron Reese

The best explanation if have seen is that extroverts get energy from being in a group setting but introverts lose energy. It has a loose correlation with wanting to be the centre of attention.

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jmdejager profile image
๐Ÿค๐Ÿฅ‡ Jasper de Jager • Edited

So true and so recognizable!

1: I'm an introvert myself, more of a deep conversation type than just talk about anything. Not anti-social!
2: Ok, I do game, but casual
3: Anyone who ever told someone they "work with computers" can relate to this one I think ๐Ÿ˜‚
4: definitely no nerd!
5: love to dress up! although mostly smart casual

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technoglot profile image
Amelia Vieira Rosado Author

1: I'm an introvert myself, more of a deep conversation type than just talk about anything. Not anti-social!

This one hits home for sure! I'm perpetually allergic to small talk...๐Ÿ˜’

5: love to dress up! although mostly smart casual

Same here, but thanks to the lockdown it's usually PJs lately! ๐Ÿ˜‚

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mellen profile image
Matt Ellen

Re #3: My office manager came up to me today and said "This USB stick I found is password protected, can you open it?" She'd already tried herself, so saying "don't plug random USB sticks into company computers" was not going to help. I just said "I can't do that", because I don't know how. I just hope there was nothing nasty on it.

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technoglot profile image
Amelia Vieira Rosado Author

I just said "I can't do that", because I don't know how.

Best thing one can do at times is to be completely honest ๐Ÿคท๐Ÿปโ€โ™€๏ธ

I just hope there was nothing nasty on it.

Hehe, me too ๐Ÿ˜…

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leicorre profile image
LeiCorre
  1. Iโ€™m more of an ambivert, being just slightly more extroverted than introverted.

  2. A very light gamer at best ๐Ÿ˜„.

  3. I am not duct tape.

  4. Not sure if I fit in any actual category??

  5. I like things that look really good and I enjoy dressing up, but sometimes leggings and a hoodie are perfect.

Itโ€™s not so much a misconception about me as noticing that others seem to doubt their own ability to use technology. And not necessarily in regard to coding. People seem to beeline for โ€˜techiesโ€™ and believe their own efforts inferior. But thatโ€™s just my observation. Fun article! ๐Ÿ˜

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technoglot profile image
Amelia Vieira Rosado Author

I am not duct tape.

Hahahaha, that's a good one! ๐Ÿ˜‚ But seriously, some people just think we can fix it all...

Thanks for joining the conversation and I'm glad you enjoyed the article! ๐Ÿ˜

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rahoulb profile image
Rahoul Baruah

Haha - very true

1) Introvert but also love to be the centre of attention
2) Not a gamer
3) Nope - the best thing for a printer is a hammer
4) I like talking to nerds and I like a few geeky things but mainly I like cars, football, music and dogs
5) I just bought two pairs of flares - big trousers are back

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technoglot profile image
Amelia Vieira Rosado Author

Thanks for the hilarious comment @rahoulb ๐Ÿ˜‚! Happy to see that many of us don't fit the stereotype ๐Ÿ˜Ž

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ahferroin7 profile image
Austin S. Hemmelgarn

The fifth one especially is, honestly, a silly stereotype perpetuated mostly by movies and televsion shows. I know a lot of developers who strongly prefer to not wear formal attire in most cases, often more so than most people, but I also know plenty for whom the โ€˜default attireโ€™ is at least semi-formal.

Iโ€™m arguably in both groups myself, itโ€™s rare for me to be wearing anything either more or less formal than a polo shirt and slacks.

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technoglot profile image
Amelia Vieira Rosado Author

I agree! Mainstream media portrays devs like sloppy people that put zero effort in their appearance. Among my colleagues I see those that wear button up shirts and the like, but coincidentally, they are the ones that visit clients often, so it lowkey makes sense! ๐Ÿ˜‚ I personally like to sport a business casual/smart casual (whatever that means) look whenever possible, but on Fridays I go full casual.

Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Austin! ๐Ÿ˜

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naseki profile image
Naseki

Haha, this was a fun and lighthearted article!

Also, I don't think anyone can fix that pc, other than buying you a new one. ๐Ÿ˜‚

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technoglot profile image
Amelia Vieira Rosado Author

Glad you enjoyed it @naseki ๐Ÿ˜

Also, I don't think anyone can fix that pc, other than buying you a new one. ๐Ÿ˜‚

Seriously, there's no better fix than a purchase ๐Ÿ˜‚