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Discussion on: Do I need bachelor and master degree to get a web developer job?

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sanfra1407 profile image
Giuseppe Sanfrancesco

Hi,
in many companies is not mandatory to have a bachelor degree to be hired as web developer. I think the most important requirements are essentially two: experience and soft skills which you can get only with a regular job.

I'm not pushing you to skip the university (if I were in you I'd take at least the BD). Keep in mind that probably you won't study anything related to web development, but you'll study things like C/C++, Assembly and Java which are greats to understand what is a software and how it works.
I did not complete my studies (I left the university after two years because I was not interested in what I was studying) but I remember that I studied Assembly, Java, Common LISP, Prolog and a bit of C. The closest thing to the web was SQL and nothing else; no HTML, no JavaScript, no CSS and no PHP.

The best developers I have worked with are graduated in other things, others are not even graduated.

TL;DR
Is not mandatory to have a bachelor degree to work as web developer.

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talentlessguy profile image
v 1 r t l Author

thanks for answer! I've found a uni with web development direction in CS, but it is in ASP.NET... (super ancient framework). Well, I need to search better

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wvandam profile image
Wouter van Dam

It's certainly a good idea to get a bachelor. However, you should consider a few things.

Firstly, being a (web) developer means you have to be able to learn continuously. I guess this applies to a lot of fields these days, but it's certainly true of web development. In essence this means you need to have the motivation and ability to learn after and outside of school. Fortunately there is a boat load of material to learn from. More than anyone can handle really.

Secondly, while the industry moves fast, there are constants. Aside from the ability to learn continuously, these are patterns and principles. If your studies focus on those then you got a good education. Learning the latest new framework is neat, but tomorrow there will be a new one anyhow, if not two. These core elements are much more important and you can learn them with .NET just fine. Look them up and ask about those instead of React, Flutter, etc.

To put it differently, when you want to become a professional baker, you need to learn about the how and why of the process of baking bread. The recipe of today's special sandwich is much less important. Once you know about the process of baking bread, those specials which change every day are much easier to learn and master.

Thirdly, like Giuseppe suggests, you may want to consider taking a bachelor that is not directly related to programming. You'll learn a lot about programming on the job - it's a requirement to keep working in this field. You won't easily learn a lot about anything else on the job, yet there is a lot of value to be gained by being able to look at a problem from different perspectives - not just computer science perspectives. This is not easy, but getting an education in a different field that interests you can get you that advantage.

The primary thing however remains that you learn the core elements of programming. You can perhaps learn about them in a minor by handpicking relevant courses, so long as you can convince the teachers that you meet the required basic programming skills to participate. Your milage may vary, but I personally only started programming while I got bored for a bit with my master and got admitted to a CS class pretty easily after showing some work. Alternatively, or in addition, you can ask an experienced developer you get to know (in person) through your freelance work to be a mentor.

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talentlessguy profile image
v 1 r t l Author

Thanks for your huge reply!

I'm currently comfortable with React, Node.js (Koa and micro mostly), GraphQL and Golang.

I don't think getting a BSc in a field I'm not going to work in is useful bcoz that knowledge won't be needed anywhere. So I think CS Bsc is important.

And yeah, core things, like data structures and algorithms, are important, in frontend too.

And IMO C#.NET sucks, Golang is much more beatiful and simpler.

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wvandam profile image
Wouter van Dam

A CS bachelor is a fine choice, but don’t underestimate colleagues with a different background. Among other things I got an education in innovation processes, infrastructure and mobility and I can tell you it helps me understand, anticipate and improve specs on related projects I work on right now.

Essentially writing code is a method of describing - codifying - a process. To get the best result, being able to understand the process you want to describe is just as important as your ability to write code.