re: What Makes You a Great Programmer on The Team? VIEW POST

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Majority of software developers are aspired to be not only a competent professional but also a great one.

I'd definitely argue thus. Most of the people don't want to be great. Most of the developers don't want to be great professionals. They just want to live a decent and safe life without taking too much risk - being great requires taking big risks.

Then even the majority of those who claim they want to be great, they just daydream because they are not willing to put in all the necessary discipline and efforts.


The combination of good time management and being a good team player is an interesting topic. I'm pretty sure that many think it's a sign of greatness if devs who got stuck can always ask for your help. Well, they can always ask, but you should not always be available to them.

If you are, you might foster an environment where everyone can interrupt anyone at any moment.

On the one hand, it's selfish. When you are stuck, it's very important to you. But I bet that most often it's not so important for the one who you are just about to interrupt, even or especially if team goals are most important ones.

On the other hand, it's even counter-productive because an interruption driven way of work can be up to 50% less productive. (I should look for the study later on)

My point with this is to emphasize the importance of time management.

That skill has the utmost importance. You have to be able to block enough time for yourself to work on tasks that are important in the long run and give and communicate to the others how and when they should reach out for help that will not be immediate most of the time. And it's just fine. Most often, we just need another rubber duck. So frequently by the time, my colleague would be available, I solved the problem. Maybe because I wrote it down in the chat or maybe because I took 5 more minutes to think about it.

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