re: Why do you use your language/stack? VIEW POST

FULL DISCUSSION
 

I use Python because it has been my go to language for long and it still makes sense after all these years.

I started using Ruby because of Rails, I can say honestly that I don't think I would have picked it up without Rails. Now I like it and can't wait for Ruby 3x3.

I picked up Go because it made sense at the time due to its selling points (easy readable language, relatively easy concurrency model, single file deploy). I like it but I'm not 100% in love with it.

I use JavaScript only on the frontend (unless you count "yarn run this tool" as using JS on the server :D). Always liked JS, even when it was spaghetti prone.

I'm more in flux on what constitutes my favorite stack though. Learning new things and then bringing them back to "boring technologies" is probably my favorite stack :D

I think it's a wonderful time. More languages and frameworks are popping up than I can count, WebAssembly is truly a game changer allowing people to write hybrid apps on the frontend (especially those ones that don't like JS :D), people are starting to backtrack a little bit from creating SPAs for everything, static websites are back, tools like Phoenix LiveView will allow people to write fast server side web apps.

It's an exciting time to be a web developer, whatever language you use :D

 

Heh. I guess we're a little bit opposite. For me, the number of languages out there and trends that come and go are a little overwhelming. Of course, I also don't get to do true web development as often as I'd like.

Also, as much as I like the idea of SPAs (being one who likes JS), it really is true that there are client-side issues with the idea of everything being an SPA.

Since you went from Python to Ruby on Rails, I'm curious about what you think of Django. I haven't attempted plain Python or Ruby, or their web frameworks.

 

Heh. I guess we're a little bit opposite. For me, the number of languages out there and trends that come and go are a little overwhelming. Of course, I also don't get to do true web development as often as I'd like.

I agree, the amount is overwhelming, but experimentation leads to innovation sometimes :D One thing that has truly changed is the death of the Moore's Law and the migration to cloud computing. There's no going back there.

Also, as much as I like the idea of SPAs (being one who likes JS), it really is true that there are client-side issues with the idea of everything being an SPA.

As with everything, they have their uses, it's just that because lots of JS framework are SPA-first, many don't stop to think if they actually need a SPA or not.

Since you went from Python to Ruby on Rails, I'm curious about what you think of Django. I haven't attempted plain Python or Ruby, or their web frameworks.

I'm going to be crucified for saying this but there's not much difference between Rails and Django in terms of cognitive load. Ultimately they are both "batteries included" MVC based frameworks with a huge ecosystem. The biggest advantage is that Django has authentication and admin builtin, Rails doesn't. But you'll be fine with both, it's very easy to add auth and an admin panel to Rails.

My favorite Python framework is Flask, which is a pluggable microframework which starts from little beyond the handling of request and response and can be augmented with different libraries. The opposite direction of Django and Rails, whose default libraries can mostly be replaced by other options but it usually less common.

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