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re: Do you ever get frustrated with your Junior Developer(s)? VIEW POST

FULL DISCUSSION
 

No. I find Juniors a clean slate and wonderful to work with. Most good directors and CTOs will tell you the same. If you accept that you are paying a lot less for the junior, and that they come with certain obvious additional needs, I have never met a CTO or director that otherwise doesn't like juniors.

Statistically, the hardest developers to work with are usually mid-level. They may think they are senior, but that is part of the problem isn't it? ;)

Also, if a Junior developer is fortunate enough to be taught by an actual senior developer instead of another mid-level developer, or, even better, if the Junior can be taught by an actual architect or director, then the Junior never really gets into the "mountain of stupidity" that plagues normal mid-level developers.

How can you train or work with someone who thinks they know better?

Statistically, the dumbest developers are mid-level

Psychologically, humans are easier to get along with both when they first start something, and after they have finished climbing the 1-4 year "mountain of stupidity"; the mountain that makes them think they know things they do not. This is always the most difficult time to deal with someone.

This issue is in fact so common that it's known as the Dunning-Kruger Effect. A lot of science has been done on this, and it plagues all fields equally, not just development.

So, all personality quirks and other issues with normal human behavior that has nothing to do with knowledge aside, this human tendency to act within the Dunning-Kruger effect regarding knowledge is certainly the real issue we're all actually discussing.

In 2020, if you aren't getting paid over $150,000 a year as a developer, and you think you know a lot, you are either very, very wrong and are still climbing "Mt. Stupid", or you're severely underpaid. If you read this paragraph and think you're the latter, failing miserably will take you into the "valley of despair", i.e. place you where you belong: on the way to true wisdom.

Or, you know, it will get you paid over $150,000, which is great.

Either way, you will be sure to get over that mountain!

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